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Full text of "Coast Seamen's Journal (Sept.28,1904-Sept.20,1905)"

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INDEX-VOLUME EIGHTEEN. 

SEPTEMBER 28, 1904-SEPTEMBER 20, 1905. 



Title 



si 



Accidents, One Day 's 4 

Advance, Illegal 44 

Africa, South, Census of 4 

Aged In Prance, The 40 

Agriculture, Department of, Report 12 

Alaska, Population of 20 

Alcoholic Liquors, Money Spent for 21 

"Alden Besse" Sold to Japs. 46-5; 47-7 ; 

Allotments, Illegal 4 

' ' Amazing and Dramatic " 8 

American Federation of Labor — 

Convention Call 1 

Welcome A. F. of L 7 

Convention of A. P. of L 

Executive Council on Seamen-Longshore- 
men 26 

A. P. of L. Membership and Finances. .26-14; 

Americans, Exodus of to Canada ■ 13 

Andersen, Mrs., Death of 29 

Antediluvian Law, An 22 

Anti-Boycott Bill (Cal.) 20 

Anti-Boycott Bill (Cal.) Defeated 26 

Anti-Boycott Bill, Colorado 32 

Anti-Trust Law (Arkansas) Declared Valid. 44 

Anti-Scalping, Against 5 

' ' Antiope ' ' Captured By Japs 50 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc 

3-11 ; 14-3 ; 20-3 ; 30-3 ; 

Arctic Sea, The 16 

Arctic Ship ' ' Discovery " 16 

Aristocracy, Our Landed 37 

Armies, Small 37 

Army Transport Service 14 

Army, Our Standing 51 

Arthur, Port, Japanese Losses 3 

Assassination In Russia 23 

' ' Athos ' ' Yarn, The 52 

Australian Notes 

4-2; 7-2; 9-9; 13-7; 15-7; 18-7; 22-7; 

27-2; 31-2; 34-2; 38-2; 40-2; 43-2; 47-2; 49-2; 

' ' Australia ' ' Captured By Japs 50-5 ; 

Australian Commonwealth, Revenue of 49 

Australia and Australians 48 

Australia, Eight Hours In 43 

Australia, Lake Contract For 33 

Australian Labor Politics 21 

Australian Labor Methods 4 



No. Page 



8 
3 

13 
5 
4 
4 

12 

51-5 

3 

6 



7 

6 

;9-l 



1 

41-14 

4 

7 

6 

6 

14 

14 

4 

6 

5 

52-14 

7 



3 

2 

9 

3 

13 

13 

10 

25-2; 

51-2 

52-5 

13 

2 

7 
8 
1 
1 



B 



Bakers (N. Y.) Win 49 3 

Balloon Expedition to North Pole 48 11 

Baltic to Black Sea 3 9 

Bank, State Workingmen 's 22 13 

Banks, National in United States 24 4 

Barber Shops Exempt from Sunday-Closing 

Law 43 

Barge Evil, To Curb 22 

Barge Tows, Transatlantic 44 

Barkentines, Five-Masted 35 

Baseball Players, To Organize 43 

Battle of Japan Sea 37 

Births in London 24 

Belgium, Labor Laws of 52 

Bells, Submarine 41 

' ' Bennington, ' ' Explosion On 

44-5; 45-5; 45-6; 47-5; 48-5; 50-14; 50-15 

Bill, A Dangerous 24 3 

Birth-Rate, Decrease of 50 

Bishops and Labor 11 

Black Diamonds, Digging 22 

Blue Laws a 1 Labor Laws 32 

Boiler-Scale Destroyer 17 

Bon Voyage ! 32 

Boycott, Legality of the 14 

Bravery (Seamen), Rewards for 

....25-15; 33-15; 37-15; 42-11; 44-15; 45-11; 50-15 

British Columbia, Wages in 3 10 

British Trade-Union Congress 6 2 

Brooklyn Dock Fire 6 15 



Title No. Page 

Buckley Appeal, The 3 6 

Buenos Ayres, Population of 2 13 

Buffalo, Sagacity of the 9 9 

Bullfighters, Union of 26 12 

Buryeson, F. H. ("A Christmas Outing").. 13 3 

Buoys on the Coast 15 8 

C 

Cable, Atlantic 7 9 

Cable Rates, Alaskan 10 6 

Cable Rates in Canada 34 2 

Camels in Arabia 42 2 

Canada 's Gold 5 2 

Canada, Exodus of Americans to 13 4 

Canadian Shipping 6-2 ; 41-8 

Canadian Craft, Inspection of 43 2 

Canadian Wireless Station 52 5 

Canals of Mars 7 8 

Canals in China 23 8 

Canal Coolies, Not Wanted 31 6 

Canal Lifts 37 2 

Canal, Proposed New 39 8 

Canal (Soo) Traffic 52 9 

Canal Record, St. Mary 's 44 S 

Canal (St. Mary's), Semi-Centenary of 42 8 

Candidates, These Say ' ' Yes " 6 6 

Cape to Cairo 24 8 

Carpenters and Joiners, Membership of.... 34 14 

Cataract, Hugest 14 8 

Censorship, The Press 49 6 

Character, Education in 32 3 

Charity for "Poor Jack' ' 12 3 

Chicago, Population of 41 4 

Child Labor, Etc.— 

Child Labor, Figures of 5 14 

Child Labor 16 3 

Child Labor, More 23 3 

Child Labor Law (Cal.) Signed by 

Governor 23 14 

Child Labor, More Bills 26 3 

Child Labor Law (Cal.) 39 1 

Child Labor Law (Pa.) 45 11 

China, Population of 46 4 

China Coast Shipping 47 5 

Chinese, Japanese, Exclusion Of, Etc. — 

Anti- Japanese Movement, The 27 1 

Anti-Japanese League in San Francisco. . . 32 14 

Chinese in South Africa 24 2 

Chinese in German Samoa 25 12 

Chinese Emigration 37 9 

Chinese Exclusion Act 40 1 

Chinese Coolies Wanted 42 3 

' ' Chinese ' ' Wing 42 8 

Coolie Servants 43 10 

Chinese Labor for Mexico 44 2 

Chinese Exclusion 46 1 

' ' Chinese ' ' Wing Defeated 46 S 

Chinese in New York 47 4 

Chinese Exclusion 48 3 

Chinese Admitted to United States 49 4 

Chinese in the East 50 5 

Chinese Assault Women 51 12 

Exclusion Movement, The 44 2 

"Executive Order" 41 14 

Eureka Excludes Chinese 36 7 

German View of the Jap 17 7 

Hawaii, Chinese Slavery in 17 6 

History of Exclusion 38 5 

Japanese Exclusion, For 5-1 ; 6-6 

Japanese Immigration, The 13 6 

Japan, Population of 17 13 

Japanese Invasion, The 23 1 

Japanese Question, The 24 7 

Japanese on Western Rai ids 24 14 

Japanese Gang-Labor 27 3 

Jap Versus Australian 33 1 

Japanese Exclusion League 34 1 

Japanese Employed in Packing Plant 34 12 

Japanese Strike in Hawaii 35 14 

Japs, Apt Pupils, The 36 7 

Japanese Immigration 39 7 



Title >s No. Page 

Japanese Labor Situation in Hawaii 42 11 

Jap Barbers in San Francisco 49 14 

Keep Up the Bars ! 14 6. 

Let the Chinese Come 41 3 

Mexico, Chinese Labor for 44 2 

' ' Modification ' ' Order, The 40 6 

Mongolians on the Coast 48 2 

' ' No Discrimination " 50 3 

President on Exclusion 43 6 

Struggle for Exclusion 42 2 

Times (N. Y.) Admits Defeat 52 3 

Transmississippi Straddle, The 48 6. 

. Wages of Chinese Labor 45 5 

Christmas Outing, A (F. H. Buryeson) 13 3 

Chronometers on Ice 2 8 

Cigar, The Scab 52 2 

Citizenship, Seamen and 5 3 

Citizens' Alliance — 

Alliance and Engineers 25 7 

Alliance Politics Condemned 31 7 

Parry 's Ideal Union 18 6 

Polities, Citizens ' Alliance 31 1 

Post's "Proclamation" 34 8 

Printers Defeat Alliance 44 1 

' ' Proclamation of Freedom " 34 3 

City, Best Governed 1 8 

Civil War Flags, Return of to States 24 4 

Clerks, Lady, in London 15 H 

Clocks, Extraordinary 4 8 

' ' Clock, Watching The " 43 3 

Coal Supply, The 36 9 

' ' Coals to Newcastle " 40 7 

Coal Beds of Ireland 41 5 

Coast, Buoys on the 15 8 

Coast Seamen's Journal (Friendly Com- 
ment) 8 7 

Collins, Mayor, Death of 52 4 

Colorado, Election in 16 4 

Convict Labor in New York State 21 14 

' ' Companionship ' ' of France, The 45-1 ; 46-2 

Compass, Variations of the 8 8 

Consumption, Treatment of 2 10 

Convict Labor on Government Works Pro- 
hibited 36 14 

Cooks ' Anniversary, The 33-2 ; 33-7 

Cooks and Stewards, To 14 7 

Co-Operative Mining 27 9 

Corrupt Practices Bill 28 3 

Corruption, National 50 3 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Courts and Contracts 42 3 

Criminal Sent to Sea 26 6 

Dallemagne vs. Moisan 48 7 

Damages, Seaman Awarded 9 2 

Eight Hours Knocked Out 12 3 

Fellow-Servants 24 6 

' ' La Bourgogne ' ' Case 43 15 

' ' Mutiny ' ' Case Dismissed 29 8 

Questionable Decision, A 31 3 

' ' Rio de Janeiro, ' ' Case of 21-5 ; 2U-5 

Seaman Recovers Damages for Injuries. . . 16 5 
Seaman Imprisoned for Refusing to Go to 

Sea 40 l'J 

Seaman Imprisoned for Refusing to Pro- 
ceed to Sea . . *. 41 12 

Seamen (British), Articles Cancelled 43 12 

Slave, One, and Two Republics 32 6 

Supreme Court and Seamen 32 1 

Supreme Court, Wisdom of 48 3 

Unjudicial Decision, An 16 6 

Wiberg, Elias, Verdict for Damages Re- 
versed 23 5 

Cremation in Great Britain 40 2 

Crews, Efficiency of 19 6 

Crew, Steamer Drills 46 3 

Crimping in Portland 46 6 

Crimps, Longshoremen and 26 '"8 

Cruelty on Oystermen 2 1 " 

Cunarder "Caronia" 36 9 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME EIGHTEEN 



Title • No. Page 

Cunnington, Al., Death of 20 5 

Custer 's Last Stand 2 8 

< yclone, Tornado and 36 2 

D 

Danger, A Threatened 8 6 

Danish- Jap Company 37 10 

Deep-Sea Exploration 15 9 

Department Stores, German 36 2 

Depositors in United States Savings Banks. ..22 4 

Desertions, Naval 46 10 

Desertions and "Enlistments " 30 7 

Desertions, Navy 23 7 

Desertions from the Navy 20 7 

Diamond, Largest ". 20-15 ; 21-13 

Diamonds, Digging Black 22 9 

Dilke, Lady, Death of . . 6 13 

Dilke, Lady, Memorial to 52 12 

Direct Legislation, Need of 5 3 

Direct Legislation 10 3 

Direct Legislation 46 3 

' ' Discovery, ' ' Arctic Ship 16 8 

' ' Doctor ' ' Reels 'Em Off 35 7 

"Doctor," Troubles of the 31 7 

Dogfish, Opalized 4 9 

Domestic Help in Italy 16 2 

Drills, Steamer Crew 46 3 

Drunks, Island for 37 9 

Dues, Light and Anchor 11 8 

£ 

Early-Closing, Scotch 37 2 

Earthquakes in Italy 52 13 

Economic Bond, Labor 's 49 2 

Education, Need of 29 3 

Education in Character 32 3 

Eight-Hour Law (New York) Declared Un- 
constitutional 11 14 

Eight-Hour Bill (Colo.) Passed 21 14 

Eight-Hour Bill in British Columbia 24 14 

Eight-Hour Bill (Colo.) 26 12 

Eight-Hour Law Applied to Panama Canal.. 36 14 

Eight-Hour Law on Panama Canal Zone.... 41 14 

Eight Hours in Australia 43 7 

Electoral Vote, Republican 9 4 

Electricity, To Steer by 34 8 

Elevators in Manitoba 18 8 

Eliot Increases His Output 15 3 

Emigration, Swedish 6 9 

Emigration, Irish 42 2 

Employers, Shortsighted 39 3 

" Enlistments, " Desertions and 30 7 

Engineers, Alliance and 25 7 

Europe, Salvage Service in 17 9 

Excursion Steamers ' Licenses Revoked 50 IS 

"Exposition, Floating'' 46 15 

F 

Factory Ventilation 44 2 

Failures, Commercial 14 4 

Fall River Strike 19 7 

Families, Large 14 9 

Farewell to Taf t 42 1 

Feathered Friend, Sailor 's 6 9 

Federation of Labor, Oregon 51 1 

Female Labor, German 51 8 

Financial Transactions of United States 

Cities 49 11 

Fire, Brooklyn Dock 6 15 

Fire Losses in United States 16 4 

Fisheries — 

Fecundity of Fish 3 2 

Fishes, Some Giant 15 8 

Fishing by Telephone 49 5 

Cloucester Fishermen, Loss of 10 15 

Herring Fisheries, The 43 2 

Japan 's Fisheries 8 9 

Ovster Industry on Puget Sound 21 15 

Packing Plants, Sale of 21 5 

Salmon Pack, 1904 20 15 

Salmon Pack, 1905 40 5 

Salmon, Atlantic on the Coast 47 g 

Salmon Pack on ( oast 50 5 

Sound Fisheries, The 29-1 ; 45 2 

Fishermen's Protective Union — 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Amundsen, Win 21 5 

Anderson, Chas 20 5 

Butler, .7 5 5 

Erasmo, Husso 2 5 

Einigan, John 48 5 

Hill. Martin 14 5 

Hnrly, Patrick Win 21 5 

Jensen, J. II 13 5 

Johnson, Theodore 22 5 

Johnson, J. C 48 5 

McFerran, Robert 15 5 

Nass, Otto 4 5 

Petersen, Anton 32 5 

Smith, Herman 21 5 

Taprell, Martin 4 5 

Williams, Richard 13 5 

Fraser River Wages 43 5 

Strike of Halibut Fishermen 3 5 

Washington Fish Commissioners' Report.. 11 5 

Five-Cent Restaurant 42 4 

Fleet, The Steel Trust 27 8 

' ' Floating Exposition " 46 15 

Fog Signal, A New 19 8 

' ' Fool Killer No. 3 " 11 15 

Formosan Ports, Open 16 8 

"Fourth," Deaths Resulting from Celebra- 
tion 42 4 

Fowls Bred at Sea 37 7 

France, Population of 19 7 

' Fraternal ' ' Foolishness 32 6 

'ree-Ship Question 27 3 

nch Capital in Russia 1 1 

'■ ■ .h Mercantile Marine 51 5 



Title No. Page 

Friend 's Unfounded Fears, A 3 1 

Furuseth 's Report on Labor Bills 28-1 ; 28-7 

Furuseth 's Labor Day Address 52 1 



Gallinger's, Senator, Report 18 3 

Galley, A Word From the 17 2 

Gardens, Workingmen 's 16 8 

Garment Workers, Help the! 15-7; 30-7; 47-6 

German Line, Great 39 2 

German Merchant Marine 7 8 

German Seamen 's Union,. Convention of .... 38 11 

' ' Germany, As They Do In " 2 6 

Gift, The Rockefeller 30 6 

Glass Industry, Belgian 9 8 

' ' Glen Island ' ' Disaster, The 15 3 

Gold, Canada 's 5 2 

Gomez, General Maximo, Death of 39 11 

Government by Experts 26 2 

' ' Governments, Ideal " 22 3 

Greenland, Expedition to 19 2 

Grosvenor 's (Mr.) Speech 23 7 

Gubernatorial Contest in Colorado 26 4 

Gulf Stream Problems 17 7 

Gulls Cross Pacific 1 8 

Gunnery (Naval) Records Broken 40 15 

H 

Half-Holiday Bill (Cal.) Signed by Governor 26 14 

Hamburg-American Line 18-12; 21-15 

Hay, Secretary of State, Death of 41 4 

Hawaii. School Children in 48 4 

"Hesper" Converted into Barkentine 2 5 

High Noon at Sea 7 7 

Hoar, Unite. 1 States Senator, Death of 2 4 

"Homes,'' Sailors' 17 3 

Horses, Origin of 43 5 

Hotel, High-Priced 8 8 

Hotels, Steamers Like 16 : 

Hotels in United States 21 4 

Houses, Live in Circular 22 8 

Eouseworking People 37 7 

Hundred-Year Rules 6 8 



Ice, Chronometers On 2 8 

"Ideal Governments" 22 3 

"Industrial Workers of the World" 27-6; 42-6; 44-14 

Industries of Iceland 26 2 

Illiteracy in Portugal 9 12 

Immigration in Panama 1 10 

Immigration to United States, Figures of. . . 11 12 

Immigration from Russia 21 4 

Immigration to Canada 27 9 

Immigration Tests 46 3 

I ndia, Deaths from Plague in 36 13 

India Rubber, Imports of 13 12 

Initiative and Referendum 6 3 



Injunctions — 

Furuseth on the Injunction 

( tenesis of the Injunction 

Injunction to be Tested 

Injunctions in Labor Disputes 

Interest in Injunction Test 

I we Injunction, The 

Insult to the City, An 

Insurance by Trade-Unions 

1 DBurance Losses 

International Seamen's Union of America- 

Com cut ion, I 'all for 

I .invention, To the 

Convention, Proceedings of 

11-1; 12-1; 12-6; L3-1; 13-2; 13 

' ' Home ' ' Question, The 

International Affiliation 

Seamen Will Entertain 

Standard of Efficiency, A 

Irish Emigration 

Iron Deposits, The World 's 

Irrigation in California, Oregon and the 

Dakotas 

Isthmus, < 'omlitions on the 

J-K 

Jack Tar 'a Wages 

Japan Secures Monopoly of Tobacco 

Jap Exodus, Is There A 

Japanese Losses at 203-Meter Hill 

Japanese Losses at Mukden and Tie Pass. . . . 

John Paul Jones, Body of 

"Jurisdiction" Issue, The 

Kitchen, Liner 's Huge 

' ' Knowledge Is Power " 

Krueger, President, Burial of 

Kuropatkin. Defeat of 



44 

3 

5 

13 

28 

33 

7 

5 

28 

14 

4 



1 
6 
6 
1 
8 
1 
7 
14 



6 

3 

14-1 
2 
6 
6 
1 
2 



5 
13 

7 
L3 

12 

13 

1 

9 

3 

13 

13 



' ' Labby ' ' on Togo 'a Victory 

Labor History, A Bit of 

Labor, Divisions of 

Labor Methods, Australian 

Labor Press and Politics 

Labor Movement, Law of the 

Labor, Cheap Afloat 

Labor, Bishops and 

Labor Laws, New York 's 

Labor Politics, Australian 

Labor Temple, Magnificent 

Labor Legislation, California .... 
Labor Bills, Furuseth 's Report on 

Labor Union, Praise for 

Labor Laws, Blue Laws and 

Labor Statistics, New York 



42 

1 

1 

. 4 

5 



6 


1 


8 


3 


11 


9 


19 


3 


21 


1 


22 


2 


27 


6 


-l; 


28-7 


31 


3 


32 


3 


33 


3 



Lake Seamen's Union — 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Hartley. ( harles F 38 

Flynn, George F 38 

Morgan, (has 25 

Noble, Sam 38 



Title No. Page 

Powell, John 52 5 

Shine, Edward 25 9 



Agreements for 1905 85-8 ; 

Lake Seamen 's Convention 19-8 ; 

In Memoriam (Deceased Members) 20 

Pere Marquette Agreement 30 

Season, Outlook for the 28 

Landed Aristocracy, Our 37 

Labor Asserts Its Rights 37 

Labor Council (S. F.) Cited for Contempt of 

Injunction 41 

Labor Laws, British Columbia 43 

Labor Statistics, New York 45 

' ' Labor Lobby, ' ' The 47 

Labor Day Outlook, The 49 

Labor 'a Economic Bond 49 

Labor Day Programme 49 

Labor Day Review 50 

Labor in New Zealand 50 

' ' Labor, ' ' New York Times on 51 

Labor, German Female 51 

Labor Laws of Belgium 52 

Labor Temple, A 52 

Lake Boats, Large 17 

Lake Region Tilting 87 

Lake Craft, Largest 30 

Lake Shipping, Important to 31 

Lake Appointments 31 

Lake Steamers, Growth of 40 

Lake Leviathan, New 43 

Lake Disaster, Old 44 

Lake Improvements 46 

Lake Cargo Records 47 

Lakes, Is Level of, Falling? 50 

Language, A Flow of 5 

Law, An Antediluvian 22 

Law 'a Delays, The 41 

Lawyers in Prison 46 

Lead Poisoning, Essays on 47 

Legal Aid Society 11 

Legislation, Direct 46 

Legislation, Some Needed 7 

Legislation, Direct, Need of 5 

"Leicester Castle," Trial of Mutineer 32 

Lesson Learned, A — Or Lost ? 21 

' ' Lest We Forget " 8 

Lewis and Clark Exposition, Opening of ... . 38 

Liao Yang, Russian Losses 2 

Licenses of Excursion Steamers Revoked.... 50 
Life-Preservers, Kapoc and Ground Cork... 7 

Life-Saving Service, Annual Report of 12 

Lifeboat, Unsinkable 16 

Lifeboats, Launching 5 

Life-Savers, Work of 16 

Life Afloat, Safety of 52 

Light and Anchor Dues 11 

Livernash and Wynn 3 

Lincoln 's Birthplace Purchased 50 

uiner 's Huge Kitchen 5 

Liners, Population of 39 

Lloyds, Meaning of 16 

Lloyds' Register, Shipbuilding in Great 

Britain 22 

Lockout (N. Y. Building Trades). Cost of . . 1 

Lockout, Printers,' 41-6; 44-1; 44-7; 

Locomotive Speed, Record of 38 

Log-Raft to be Towed Across the Pacific. .40-5 ; 

Log-Raft Arrived in San Francisco 50 

London, Alone In 37 

Longshoremen and Seamen — 

A. F. of L. Supports the Seamen 

A. F. of L. and Longshoremen 

Another Richmond Afield 

City Front Federation Acts 

Contemporary 's Opinion, A 

I >ual Union Dies 

"Federation of Longshoremen" 

Friends Once More 

Long Name and Long Bow 

Longshore Lumbermen Act 

Longshoremen and Crimps 

Longshoremen 's Lies 

Longshoremen Urged to Act 

Longshoremen and Sailors 

More "Long-Name'' Withdrawals 

MuMlteo Longshoremen Withdraw 

New Name for Longshoremen 

•'Nothing to Arbitrate" 

Oregon Longshoremen ' ' Bolt " 

Portland (Or.), Situation In 

Riggers "222" Withdraw 

Sailors Act in Self-Defense 

Seamen and Longshoremen 

Talks With Longshoremen 

Victory for Seamen 

' ' What 's In a Name ? " 

Loyalty, Reward of 

Lundhcrg's Second Trial ("Slocum" Case). 

Lumber Shipments 



16 
45 
36 
35 
35 
29 
36 
46 
44 
38 
26 
29 
35 
47 
45 
51 
26 
38 
51 
30 
39 
18 
10 
25 
10 
31 
42 
28 
41 



M 



Machine Fitters in Russia 

Magnetism, Terrestrial 

Mail (Ocean), Subsidies 

Man, The Tallest 

Man, Petrified 

"Man Behind the Gun,'* The 

Manning Problem, The 

Manuscript, Stories About .... 
Marine, (ierman Merchant .... 

Mariners, Women As 

Marksmanship Records Broken 

Mars, Canals of 

Martyrs, Legal 

Masts, Famous 

Mates Arc Stevedores! 

Mathias, T. II., Death of 

Memory 



6 

25 

21 

29 

15 

47 

22 

15 

7 

2 

47 

7 

5 

3 

48 

21 

9 



26-8 
21-8 
9 
8 
8 
3 
7 

14 
5 

10 
1 
1 
3 
6 
1 
2 
7 
8 
2 

3 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
6 
3 
11 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 
6 
2 
12 
13 
15 
15 
15 
2 
3 
8 
6 
8 
6 
4 
9 
o 

9 

15 

14 

46-6 

4 

40-6 

5 

7 



10 
2 
3 
2 

8 
3 
6 

a 

8 
9 
4 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME EIGHTEEN 



Title No. Page 

Men or Seamen ? 19 6 

Mercantile Marine, French 51 5 

Merchant Marine, Norwegian 23 15 

Mexican Navy, The 16 7 

' ' Mikasa, ' ' Explosion On 52 13 

Military Law (French), Term of Service 

Reduced 26 13 

Miners in Peru 44 2 

Mining, Co-Operative 27 9 

Missouri Went Republican 9 4 

' ' Mister ' ' and Its Meaning 32 2 

Mitchell, U. S. Senator 42-4 ; 46-4 

Money Orders, Amount Issued 6 4 

' ' Montara ' ' Captured by Japs 49 5 

Moscow, Census of * 36 2 

Mother-in-Law, The 6 8 

Mourning, Sailors In 46 5 

Mukden, Battle of 25-13 ; 34-13 

' ' Murderers, Worse Than " 36 3 

Mutinies at Sea 44 3 

Mutiny on ' ' Potemkine " 

41-13; 42-6; 42-13; 46-13; 49-11 

Mutineers (Russian), Sentence Upon 22 13 

Mutineers (' ' Pruth ' ') Sentenced 48 11 

Mystery, A Great 34 6 

Myth, A Stereotyped 35 3 

N 

National Banks in United States 24 4 

National Guard, I. T. U. Defeats Resolution 

Against 50 14 

Naturalization Papers, Fraudulent 

43-5; 44-5; 46-5; 47-5; 48-5 

Nature, Socialism and 52 3 

National Corruption 50 3 

Naval and Military Budget, Germany's 12 13 

Naval Appropriation Bill 24 4 

Naval Ration Money 47 3 

Naval Desertions 46 10 

Navigation, Aid to 5 8 

Navigation and Shipping, Great Britain.... 47 11 

Naval Powers, World 's 39 5 

Navy Department Estimates 10 15 

Navy, The Mexican 16 7 

Navy, Desertions From the 20 7 

Navy Yards, Shipbuilding In 4 6 

Navy Yard (Mare Island, Cal.), Appropria- 
tion for 22 5 

Navy Desertions 23 7 

Navy (British) Estimates 25 12 

■ ' ' Navy, The Sailor Is the " 29 3 

Negro Origin, Are We Of? 16 2 

New York, To Organize 10 3 

New York City, Population of 39 4 

Newspapers, British 37 2 

"New" Trade-Unionism 19 6 

New Zealand Labor 50 2 

Nicknames for Warships 36 2 

Nome, Stay Away From •• 40 6 

' ' No-Money ' ' Clause, The 1 3 

' ' North, ' ' Confiscation of 43 5 

North Pole Expedition Sails 43 15 

North Pole Expedition 46 15 

North Pole Expedition (Zeigler) Relieved. . . 47 11 

North Pole Expedition, Balloon 4S 11 

North Sea and Baltic Canal 24 15 

North Sea Incident 5-13 ; 25-13 ; 25-15 

Norway Declares Independence.. 38-13; 47-13; 49-11 

Norwegian Merchant Marine 23 15 

Norwegian Shipping 35 ) 



Ocean Waves, Power of 18 

Ocean Shallows, Discovers 22 

Ocean, Planning a New 24 

Ocean Yacht Race 33 

Old-Age Pensions Bill, British 39 

Old-Age Pensions (New Zealand) 13-12, 52- 



-Age 

Old Story, The Same 9 

Opalized Dogfish 4 

"Open" and "Closed" Shop — 

' r Closed " vs. " Open ' ' Shop 38 

' ' Open Shop, ' ' What Means 5 

' ' Open Shop, ' ' Ethics of the 15 

' ' Open Shop, ' ' Prize Paper on 15 

' ' Closed Shop, ' ' The Law of the 20 

' ' Open Shop, ' ' Meaning of 48 

Organ-Grinding Pays 4 

Organization, The Power of 8 

' ' Oregon, ' ' Fire On 24 

Oregon State Federation of Labor 51 

Ostend-Dover Line 24 

Oystermen, Cruelty On 21 

P-Q 

Pacific, Gulls Cross 1 

Paddling to America 11 

Pain Killed by Light 16 

Palestine, Germans In 31 

Panama, Immigration In 1 

Panama Canal, Plans of 23 

Panama Canal Commission 29 

' ' Paramount Issue, ' ' The 29 

Parcels Post Treaty, United States-Great 

Britain 24 

Parcels Post Service, Australia-United States 41 

Passenger List, Largest 1 

Patents, Commissioner, Report of 20 

Paternalism, Step-fatherly 38 

Peace, Terms of '47 

Peace Terms Agreed Upon 50 

Pendleton ' ' Talks Shop " 5 

Pennsylvania Railroads' Relief Fund 

16-14; 30-14; 38-14; 45 

Pension System, Michigan Central Railroad . . 16 

Pensions, United States 52 

Peonage in the South 32 

People, The Swedish 3 

' ' Peril of the Sea, ' ' Another 12 

Personal Liberty, To Curtail 20 

Petrified Man 15 



Title No. Page 

Pigeons, Speed of 24 13 

Pigs in War Strategy 15 2 

Pilotage, Against Compulsory 20 5 

Pilot Bill, Littlefield 's 22 3 

Plague in India, Deaths From 25 13 

Plague in India, Deaths From 36 13 

Plants, How See 37 9 

Plasterers, German 15 2 

Poisoning, Essays on Lead 47 2 

Police (London) Statistics 23 9 

' ' Political Action " 11 3 

' ' Political-Action ' ' Theory, The 41 6 

Polities, Labor Press and 5 7 

Politics, In London Unions 7 6 

Politics, Australian Labor 21 1 

' ' Poor Jack, ' ' Charity for 12 3 

Port Arthur, Surrender of 15 13 

Port, Scottish Atlantic 18 2 

Portland, Or., Population of 41 4 

Port, To Improve the 4 6 

Postoffice Money Orders, Amount Issued. ... 6 4 

Postoffice Deficit 9 12 

Postoffice Employes, Dismissal of 20 14 

' ' Potemkine, ' ' Mutiny on 

41-13; 42-6; 42-13; 46-13; 49-11 

Power, Restitution of 52 3 

Prices, Wages and 2 7 

President 's Salary, Proposition to Increase 

Defeated 26 12 

President, The, on Temperance 50 6 

Press Censorship, The 49 6 

Printers ' Lockout 41-6 ; 44-1 ; 44-7 ; 46-6 

Prize-Fight, Naval Seaman Killed In 49 15 

Professors at Loggerheads 14 3 

Profit-Sharing 49 5 

Programme, A Good 25 10 

Promotion Committee, The 9 6 

Propeller, A New 5 9 

Property of New York State, Value of 51 4 

' ' Protection of Sailors " 14 6 

' ' Pruth ' ' Mutineers Sentenced 48 11 

Public Utilities in Hull 21 2 

Public Demands Efficiency 32 7 

"Public," What Is the? 51 8 

Purchasing Power of Wage3 2 3 

' ' Puritan, ' ' Cup Yacht, Sold 41 15 

Questions, Some Pointed 20 9 

' ' Quick Lunch ' ' Tragedy 3 8 

R 

"Race Murder" 32 3 

Raft, Unsinkable 35 2 

Railway Accidents 2 9 

Railways, Public Service of 3 

Railroad, Northern Pacific, Earnings of ... . 3 

Railroads, Loss of Life on 4 

Railroad Employes 6 

Railways, German 18 

Railroads (U. S.), Accidents on • ■ • ■ 19 

Railroads (German), Employes on 22 

Railroad Employes' (British) Wages 25 

Railroads, Deaths and Accidents on 30 

Railway Rates for Workmen 51 

Rapid Transit, Saving by 14 

Ration-Money, Naval 47 

Realistic Sea, The (Poem, by T. H. Mathias) 13 

Rear-Admiral, A Wise 34 

Reasoning, Queer 25 

Record, A Remarkable 44 

Record-Breaking, Cost of 48 

Record Passages — 

Blackstone Island-Susquehanna River .... 43 

Cape Henry-Cape Cod . 34 

Eureka-Topolobampo 41 

Hamburg-Honolulu 24 

Kaighn 's Point-Cardenas 5 

New York-Lizards 42 

Philadelphia-Fernandina 6-15 ; 8 

Puget Sound-San Francisco 21 

Sand Key-Philadelphia 34 

Sandy Hook-The Needles 36-15 ; 37- 

San Francisco-Honolulu 49 

Windsor-Chester 48 

Reindeer in Alaska 3 

Religious Freedom Proclaimed by Czar 32 

Restaurants, Parisian 7 

Restitution of Power 52 

Republican Electoral Vote 9 

' ' Rise of the Tailors, The " 15 

River Current, Change in 30 

Rockefeller Gift, The 30 

' ' Rockefellerism " 33 

Rojestvensky 's Reasons for Defeat 44 

Roman Urns 14 

Roof Dwellers 11 

Russia, French Capital In 1 

Russia, Immigration From 21 

Russian Losses in War .25 

Russia 's Government 30 

Russia's Financial Loss in Battle of Japan 

Sea 39 

' ' Ruth, ' ' Converted into Coal Hulk 1 

S 

Safety of Life Afloat 52 

Saghalien Invaded 42 

Sailing Fleet Declining 48 

Sailor 's Feathered Friend 6 

' ' Sailors, Protection of " 14 

Sailors ' Chapel Burned 16 

Sailors ' ' ' Homes " 17 

' ' Sailor Is the Navy, The " 29 

Sailors' Home (S. F.) Changes Hands 41 

Sailors Burned to Death 41 

Sailors in Mourning 46 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Abrahamsen, Otto 5 

Amundsen, Wm 21 



7 
13 
8 
9 
6 
3 
3 
3 
5 



Title No. Page 

Andersson, Otto 39 5 

Anderson, Charles 44 5 

Appelqvist, Johan 10 5 

Arthur, Percival 51 5 

Berg, Gustaf 52 5 

Burg, Victor 5 5 

Cambazzo, Antonio '.'.... 33 5 

Carlson, Gustaf N 32 5 

Carlson, Chris 36 5 

Daley, Arthur 17 5 

Dame, Alfred 3 5 

Down, Charles 26 5 

Eckman, Carl 39 5 

Edwall, Axel 1 5 

Eliasson, C 22 5 

Eliasson, Carl Antonius 23 5 

Erlandson, George 43 5 

Gillespie, Lorenzo R 2 5 

Gronnestad, H jalmar 42 5 

Gronros, Hjalmar 33 5 

Gunn, Alfred 3 5 

Gunther, Otto 10 5 

Hansen, Alfred Sophus 33 5 

Heikkela, Alek 6 5 

Hesselberg, Christian 11 5 

Hesselberg, Chas 34 5 

Hogland, Chas 36 5 

Holla, Charles 12 5 

Jensen, Fred 11 5 

Johansen, J. R 18 5 

Johansson, Johan 44 5 

Johnson, John 23 5 

Johnson, John 25 5 

Johnson, Emil 47 5 

Johnsson, Frank Sam 52 5 

Karsten, August 14 5 

Kastein, Frank 22 5 

Killstrom, Andrew 51 5 

Kleven, Alfred Sigurd 30 5 

Knudson, Hans 16 5 

Lind, John 16 5 

Linde, Magnus 33 5 

Malm, Johan 26 5 

Moore, Ben 6 5 

Moran, James 2 5 

Nabbe, Erick 4 5 

Nielsen, Bernt 52 5 

Nygaard, Ole M. 49 5 

Olsen, Nils 13 5 

Olsen, Christian 45 5 

Olsson, Frederic 22 5 

Olufsen, John 22 5 

O 'Neill, Joseph 10 5 

Peterson, Charles 49 5 

Petterson, Carl Axel 13 5 

Pruhs, Peter 10 5 

Randes, Henry 9 5 

Soderland, August 37 5 

Sommers, Henry 52 5 

Soutt, Theodore 51 5 

Spidzen, Philip 51 5 

Strauss, Conrad Herman 25 5 

Sweeney, Jas. E 41 5 

Swerderus, Carl 26 5 

Thoresen, John 46 5 

Thorsen, John 37 5 

Westergren, A., 42 5 

Wiklund, Andrew Petersen 28 5 

Williams, Carl 35 5 

Agreements Renewed 44 6 

Labor Day Cup Won by Union. . . . 50-1; 50-6; 51-7 

' ' Old Guard, " To the 25 7 

Sixth, The Glorious 24 1 

Sixth on the Coast, The 25 6 

Sixth in Honolulu 26 7 

Steamship Agreement 33-6 ; 36-6 

Shipowners and Seamen 28 6 

Transport Workers, Join the 36 7 

Twenty Years of Progress 23 6 

Salvage Service in Europe 17 9 

San Francisco, Population of 35 4 

Savages, Ships Built by 16 9 

Savings Banks (U. S.), Depositors In 22 4 

Scab Cigar, The 52 2 

Scalping, Anti, Against 5 6 

Scandinavian Unions, The 5 2 

Schools, Public, In Porto Rico 3 4 

Schools, Attendance at Public 7 4 

Schools, Southern 14 8 

School Children in Hawaii 48 4 

School Teachers, Proportion of to Children.. 50 4 

Screws, Value of Triple 3 8 

Sea, High Noon at ~ 7 

Sea Level, Changes In 9 8 

Sea of Japan, Battle of 37 13 

Sea, The Realistic (Poem, by T. II. Mathias) L3 7 

Sealskins in London 10 13 

Seaman (Naval) Killed in Prize-Fight 49 15 

' ' Seamanship, Inherited " 45 3 

Seamen vs. Landsmen 37 

Seamen 's Friends, The 1 

Seamen 's Union, German 2 2 

Seamen and Citizenship ■> 

Seamen 's Union in Europe 1 1 

Seamen 's Needs Ignored I! > 

Seamen, Libel on Refuted 20 8 

Seamen 's Union, German 26 7 

Seamen, British, Fatal Accidents to 36 11 

Seamen 's Union, British 37 I 

Seamen (British), Fatal Accidents to 42 12 

Sebastopol, When Fell 7 

Shadow on the Sea, A :!!l jj 

Shipbuilding in Navy Yards 4 <> 

Shipbuilding, American 20 3 

Shipbuilding, Revival of 39 

Shipbuilding Contracts 49 8 

Ship Lines to Africa 3 8 

Ships, World 's Greatest 5 7 

Ship, A Town Like a ' 9 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME EIGHTEEN 



Title No. Page 

Ship Canal, Marseilles 19 8 

Shipping, Canadian ... 6 2 

Shipping, British 11 9 

Shipping Bills. Two 17 3 

Shipping in Para 17 7 

Shipping, Norwegian 35 9 

Shipping, Canadian 41 

Shipping and Navigation, Great Britain .... 47 

Shipowners, Fussing 17 

Shipowners, Unions of 23 

Shipowners, Concessions to 24 

Shipowners ' Liability 43 

Ship 's Treasure Chambers 18 

Ships, Wireless To 35 

Ship 's Speed, Greater 37 

Shipwrecked (.'rows. For • ■ • • 51 

Single Taxer 's Views, A 1 

Single- Taxers, To 4 

'•Sir Semper Tvrannis " 9 

Simplon Tunnel' 24-13; 28-13; 44-13 

Skyscrapers 11 8 

"Slocum" Case 2-2; 2-3 

-7;4-15; 5-6; 16-3; 21-3; 24-7; 40-10; 43-11; 44-3 

Smith, Sam, Re-elected to Arbitration (Hurt 34 11 

Smoke Consumer, German 47 2 

Social-Democratic National Vote 10 

Socialism and Nature 52 

Soo Canal Traffic 52 

South Africa, < 'ensus of 4 

Speed Record, New Ocean 18 

Spigot, Saving At the 2 

• ' Square Deal, " The 46 

st. Bernard Pass, Over the 21 

St. Mary 's Canal Record 44 

St. Louis Exposition, Admissions to 15 

Standard Oil Company, Indictment Against . 26 

Standing Army, Our 51 

State Labor Convention (Cal.) 16 

Steamboat inspection 15 

Steamboat Hearings, The 19 

Steamboat Inspection Bill 23 

Steamers Like Hotels 16 

St. -a mors, Contracts for 28 

Steamer Crew Drills 46 

Steel Trust Fleet, The 2< 

Steel Corporal inn. Earnings of 3-4; 46-13 

Steer by Electricity, To 34 

Step-fatherly Paternalism 38 

Stevedoring, Record-Breaking 4 

->res. Mutes Are 48 

Stockyards (Chicago), Pauperism In 2.) 

stoessel. General, Placed Under Arrest .... 44 

Stone, Pake, in Stettin 24 

Storm on Lake Superior 52 

Strassburg Canal, Proposed 39 

Strike Losses and Grains 3 

strikes in France 1" 

strikes iii Marseilles 18 

Strike-Breakers, Students As 26 

Strikes, Benefit of 29 

Strikes and Strike- Breakers 34 

strikes in Italy 45 

Stripes, Origin of 8 

Students in German Universities 48 

Submarine Bells 41 

Subsidies, ship 14 

Subsidies, Ocean Mail 21 

Subsidies, Ship, to Boom 30 

Subventions, Seamen and 17 

Subway, New York 6-4; 

Subway Strike in New York 24 

Success, Secret of Yankee 22 

' ' Success " 24 

s„e Z Canal 21-15; 34-7; 38-12; 46-5 

Sunday Law, German 37 7 

Sweatshops, New fork 40 3 

Swedish People, The 3 2 

Swedish Emigration 6 9 

Swedish Labor Organizations Declare Against 

War 39 12 

■ • System, A Beneficial " 36 3 



5 
8 

12 
5 
3 
3 
3 
1 
10-9 

14 



"Tacoma" Captured by Japs 26 5 

Tacoma, Wash., Population of 39 4 

Taft, Secretary of War, Reply to 40 

Parewell to 42 1 

"Tailors. Rise of the" 15 6 



Title No. Page 

' ' Tainted Laws " 40 3 

' ' Tainted Money ' ' Question, The 33-6; 52-4 

Talk Is Cheap, Where 10 9 

Tallest Man, The 29 2 

Teamsters' Strike, Chicago 29-14; 33-8; 44-14 

Telephone, Fishing By 49 5 

Terms of Peace 47 13 

Terrestrial Magnetism 25 2 

Textile Workers' Strike, Decision of Governor 

Douglas 35 14 

Thatcher's Island 17 2 

' ' Timely ' ' Distinction, A 42 3 

Times (N. Y.) on "Labor" 51 7 

Temperance, The President On 50 6 

Tobacco, Japan Secures Monopoly of 3 13 

Tobacco Trust, Finances of 25 4 

Togo 's Victory, ' ' Labby "On 42 2 

Tonnage Records at Chicago 52 15 

Torpedo Boat, A New 3-10; 6-8 

Tornado and ( lyclone 36 

Tow, Longest on Record 23 5 

Town, Like A Ship 7 9 

Tows, New Y'ork Harbor 34 3 

Trade Depression, German 22 Hi 

Trade Councils, British 23 8 

Trade-Unions, German 2 1 

Trade-Union Congress (British) 6 2 

Trade-Unions in Great Britain, Membership 

and Funds 27 11 

Union, London, Membership and Funds 33 11 

Trade-Unions a Necessity 35 3 

Trail- Unions Criticised 38 3 

Trade-Unionists, Numbers of in New York 

and Foreign Countries 33 14 

Trafalgar Day, Celebration of 6 13 

Transport Workers. The 4 7 

Transvaal Constitution 33 13 

Triple Screws, Value of 3 8 

Tuberculosis, Trade-Unions to Fight 15 14 

Turbine Engines, Adverse Report on 48 15 

Typew fit ing Record 42 11 

U— V 

Underwriters' Losses in Russo-Jap War.... 21 L2 

Unemployed, Joke on the 2n 7 

Unemployed in New York City 21-14; 22-14 

Union Membership in Canada 22 14 

Unions. The Scandinavian 5 2 

Unions, 1'olitics in London 7 6 

Unions, What Exist for 9 6 

Unions, British, in 1903 19 

Union Finances. British 21 2 

Unions ( British), Funds of 22 2 

Unions of Shipowners 23 6 

Unionism, Retrogressive 39 3 

Union Label, Booming the 1 6 

Union Label, Demand This 2 7 

Union Label Bill in Canadian Parliament... 25 14 

Union Label Adopted in Australia 40 12 

United Mine Workers. Funds of 19 14 

I'nited Mine Workers. Membership of 34 14 

Universities, Students in German 48 12 

Unsinkable Lifeboat 16 2 

Urns, Roman 14 8 

Valentine, Joseph F. (Arrest of) 10-14; 16-6 

Variations of the ( 'ompass 8 8 

Ventilation, Factory 44 2 

Voice of the People, The 26 3 

W 

Wages in Germany 1 

Wages, Purchasing Lower of 2 3 

and Prices 2 7 

in British Columbia 3 10 

Wages in Germany 15 9 

Wages in Egypt 23 2 

Wages in Northern Italy 26 11 

in Germany 30 2 

Wages, Jack Tar 's 44 5 

War Department, Estimates of 8 12 

War Strategy, Pigs in 15 2 

War Her,,, A 49 3 

War. Facts of the 51 9 

Warships, Nicknames for 36 2 

Washington, D. C, Population of 37 4 

Watch Below, In the 21 10 

' ' Watching the Clock " 43 3 

Weaving in Hungary 21 2 



Title 



Whales, Are, Coining Back? 19 

Wireless Telegraph, Land Record 13 

Wireless at Sea 29 

Wireless to Ships 35 

Wireless in England 37 

Wireless in ( anada 38 

Wireless Record (Navy) 47 

Wireless Station, Canadian 52 

Women as Mariners 2 

Women and Children Last ! 25 

Women, To Organize 2S 

Women as Wage-Earners 50 

Wood-Seasoning Process '.)* 

Work, A Commendable 7 

Workingmen 's ( iardens 16 

Workingmen's Bank, State 22 

Workmen, Railway Rates for 51 

World 's Greatest Ships 5 

Wrecks — 

''Addends " 12 

"Afghanistan" 37 

" Agnes" 37-5; 

" Alcinous" 37 

' ' Aldergrove " 30-5; 

' ' Anjou " 42 

' ' Argyle " 46 



No. Page 



' ' Barbara Boscowitz ' 
' Bertha " ... 
'Bidston Hill' 



9 

4 
7 
7 
2 
2 

15 
5 
9 
1 
3 
3 

10 
3 
8 

13 
5 
7 

5 
5 
41-5 
5 
31-13 
5 

15 
5 
IS 



3 
35 

49 5 

' • Brier Holme " 16 5 

"C. A. Hose" 27 5 

"Cascade" 26 5 

' ' < lallam " 4 5 

' ' Corunna " 1-5 ; 4-5 

• • ( ioryphene " 48 5 

"Del Norte" 32 

" Diana" 41 5 

■ ' I Irumelzier ' ' 15 15 

■ ■ P. ( !. Sieben " 50 15 

"Georg stag" 41 13 

"George W. Elder". .19-5; 21-5; 24-5; 34-5 

"Glenburn" 36-5; 37-5; 41-5 

" llenrv B. Ilvde" 1-5 

' ' Honolulu " 43-5 ; 45-5 

"J. B. Leeds" 31 5 

" Khyber" 26 13 

"Kiowa" J 15 

' ' Lafayette " 51 5 

' ' Lamorna " 3 5 

"Loyalist" 3 15. 

' ' Mainlnnder ' ' 6 5 

"Marlborough Hill" 49 15 

"Martha Davis" 37 5 

"Mary E. Russ" 31 5 

"Mavfield" 25 5 

" Mineola" 3 5 

"Mov" 41 5 

"Onward" 23 5 

" Pearl" 2d 5 

"Peconic" 50 15 

"Pionier" 8 13 

"Poiiape" 41 5 

"Quickstep" 10 5 

"Roanoke" 48 15 

"Robert Rickmers" 23 12 

"Robert Sudden" 39 5 

' ' Salamis " 4U 5 

"Spartan " 26 15 

"Stanley Dollar" 51 5 

"Tidal Wave" Il' 16 

' ' Tricolor " 45-5 J 16-5; 47-5 ; 48-5 

' ' Tropic " 41 5 

" Victor" 42 5 

"Volant" 49 5 

"Volunteer" 19 15 

• Western Home " 8 5 

"Wyetield" Captured by Japs 20-5; 21-5 

Wynn. Livernash and 3 6 

Y— Z 

Yacht Race, Ocean 33-3; 35-15; 36-15; 37-15 

?achts (American) Win Races 40 15 

Vale University, Gifts to 41 11 

• • Yankee Doodle, ' ' Origin of 3S 2 

Yankee Success, Secret of 22 8 

Yarn, The ' ' Athos " 52 10 

Zeigler Polar Expedition Relieved 47 11 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XVIII. No. 1. 



SAN FKANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBEE 28, 1904. 



Whole No. 885. 



A BIT OF LABOR HISTORY. 



The Record of tHe Anti-Injunction Bill. 

Refutation of Political Charges Against Labor Men. 



TRADE-UNIONISTS and the public generally of 
California will recall the discussion that at- 
tended the passage of the Anti-Injunction bill 
by the State Legislature of 1903. It will be remem- 
bered, too, that the discussion in the case was two- 
fold in nature; that is, it related partly to the bill 
itself and the proposed amendments thereto, and 
partly to the personal character and motives of the 
men who were intrusted by organized labor with the 
duty of securing the passage of the bill. As is well 
known, the Anti-Injunction bill was enacted into law 
and is now before the State Supreme Court, having 
been declared unconstitutional in the first case tried 
under it. Discussion upon the merits of that measure 
may therefore be deferred until the Court has ren- 
dered final judgment, when, should the result be 
unfavorable to organized labor, further steps will 
undoubtedly be taken to insure legal protection 
against infringement by the Judiciary upon the rights 
of citizens when acting in an organized capacity. 

The personal feature of the discussion upon the 
subject is another matter, and one that requires im- 
mediate attention. The charges made against the 
) epresentatives of the San Francisco Labor Council 
two years ago, in connection with their work on 
behalf of the Anti-Injunction bill, have recently been 
resuscitated, amplified and enlarged upon by after- 
thought, and circulated extensively and, of course, 
anonymously. All the circumstances suggest a pur- 
pose in this procedure, and one that bodes no good to 
the labor movement. That purpose ought to be made 
known by proof, if that be possible, or at least by 
inescapable inference. 

At this point it should be noted that the personal 
characters or feelings of the men against whom these 
charges are made need not be considered at present. 
These men have been attacked not in a personal, but 
in a representative capacity; in reality, it is the 
institution represented, not the persons representing 
it, that is attacked. It is therefore of the highest 
importance, not to any individual, but to the labor 
movement, that the motives inspiring these attacks 
should be fully considered and clearly exposed. 

Fortunately, this line of investigation obviates the 
need of considering the more offensive, in the per- 
sonal sense, of the charges made against the repre- 
sentatives of the San Francisco Labor Council. The 
statement that the latter were implicated in certain 
alleged "grafting" measures before the Legislature, 
as well as other reflections and inuendoes of a purely 
personal character, may safely be left to the judg- 
ment of the public, based upon the well-established 
records of the men in question. As already stated, 
whatever that judgment may be matters little, as 



compared with the importance of the vital issue in- 
volved. That issue, stated in a word, rests upon the 
question, whether a labor organization has a right 
to carry on its legislative work in its own way, or 
whether it must surrender its prerogative in this 
regard to any political party which may choose to 
assume the title of Labor. The attacks made upon 
the representatives of the San Francisco Labor 
Council two years ago were designed, first, to secure 
a repudiation by the Labor Council of its repre- 
sentatives at Sacramento, and, secondly, to secure, 
by the necessary inference thus conveyed, a renounce- 
ment by the Labor Council of its own rights in the 
premises. The renewal of these attacks at the present 
time is designed to create the impression that such 
repudiation and renouncement were really secured. 
The actual results are a matter oi record. To quote 
the record is to at once disprove the charges and 
expose the motive that inspired them. 

Before referring to the record, it may be well to 
briefly explain the earlier incidents of the movement 
to secure a State Anti-Injunction law. At the in- 
stance of the San Francisco Labor Council, an Anti- 
Injunction bill was introduced in the Legislature of 
1901, and referred to the Judiciary Committees of 
the Senate and Assembly, respectively. Representa- 
tives of organized labor appeared before these com- 
mittees and explained the purpose of the bill, but 
without success. Notwithstanding the defeat of the 
bill at that time, the Law and Legislative Committee 
of the San Francisco Labor Council continued its 
work during the subsequent two years, with the 
view, if possible, of securing favorable action by the 
next Legislature. In December, 1902, that Committee 
reported upon a number of measures, most important 
of which was the Anti-Injunction bill. The Labor 
Council approved these measures and instructed the 
Committee to use every possible and honorable means 
to secure their passage. In carrying out these in- 
structions, the Committee was primarily concerned 
to arrange for the introduction of the bills in such 
manner as to secure for them whatever benefit might 
accrue from favorable sponsorship, and, in any event, 
to minimize hostility by guarding against their in- 
troduction under unfavorable auspices. 

With these objects in view the representatives of 
the Labor Council conferred with Assemblyman 
Grove L. Johnson and requested that gentleman to 
introduce and work for the passage of the Anti- 
Injunction bill. This Mr. Johnson agreed to do, 
although it was stipulated by him and conceded by 
the representatives of the Labor Council that he re- 
served the right to offer an amendment to the bill if 
in his own judgment such action should become neces- 



sary. In this latter regard the representatives of the 
Labor Council simply conceded that which they could 
not withhold, except, of course, at the risk of Mr. 
Johnson's refusal to introduce the bill, in which event 
he would still have been free to amend or oppose the 
bill, as he felt disposed. In soliciting the assistance 
of Mr. Johnson, that gentleman's personal and party 
standing in the Legislature was the determining con- 
sideration. Mr. Johnson had served as chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee of the previous Legisla- 
ture, and there was every likelihood that he would 
be appointed to the same office in the Legislature then 
about to convene. From every material point of view 
it appeared that Mr. Johnson was the member whose 
sponsorship of the Anti-Injunction bill promised to 
attract and hold the largest possible support to that 
measure. Concerning the reflections cast upon the 
public record of Mr. Johnson, the representatives of 
ihe Labor Council, while fully cognizant of these, 
did not consider them as outweighing the advantages 
of that gentleman's position in the circumstances 
then existing. The Anti- Injunction bill was an honest 
measure; its only chance of passage lay in securing 
the support of the most powerful influences in the 
Legislature; consequently, it became the object of 
those intrusted with the duty of furthering the in- 
terests of the bill to enlist these influences if possi- 
ble. Had the imputations made against Mr. John- 
son been a matter of record, instead of being largely 
a matter of talk, that fact would not have militated 
against his usefulness in the circumstances under 
consideration, hence it would not have influenced the 
representatives of the Labor Council in their selection 
of the most available sponsor for the Anti-Injunction 
bill. 

The bill was introduced by Mr. Johnson, and re- 
ferred to the Committee on Judiciary, of which, as 
had been anticipated, that gentleman was chairman. 
The bill was reported to the Assembly, with the 
recommendation that it "do pass," but also with an 
amendment, providing that "nothing in this Act shall 
be construed to authorize the use of force, violence 
or intimidation." This amendment, while objectiona- 
ble for a number of reasons, did not materially affect 
the measure, since the things it was designed to 
prohibit were things which the friends of the bill did 
not desire to legalize, things which, on the contrary, 
had been distinctly disclaimed as among the purposes 
of the bill. The question, then, became one of accept- 
ing the amendment or of losing the bill. After due 
consultation, the representatives of the Labor Council 
decided upon the latter course, and so advised the 
members of the Legislature. This decision consti- 
tutes the ostensible basis of the charges made against 
the men authorized by the Labor Council to repre- 
.■ii t, it at Sacramento. 

When the bill came up for action a member of the 
Union Labor party moved to strike from the amend- 
ment the words, "or intimidation." During the debate 
another member of the same party denounced Wisler 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



and Macarthur. the two men who had throughout 
acted "ii behalf of the Labor Council, as "traitors to 
organized labor." In this course the member in 
question was supported, either positively or nega- 
tively, by the entire membership of his party in the 
Legislature. While these events were transpiring in 
the Legislature, the Union Labor members were en- 
deavoring to secure from the Labor Council a vote of 
censure on the two nun here named, at the same time 
soliciting from that body exclusive authority in the 
ease of all legislative measures emanating from its 
hands. As an illustration of these attempts and the 
results thereof, we quote from the minutes of the 
Labor Council of January 9, 1903, as follows: 

Messrs. Murphy, Mahany and Copus, Union Labor 
party Assemblymen, were given the floor. They asked 
that the; be given full opportunity to advance labor 
legislation. Motion to suspend the rules for the dis- 
cussion of this matter was lost. 

Motion made that Secretary request Council's legis- 
lative representative at Sacramento to co-operate as 
far as possible with members of the Union Labor 
party, in the interest of labor bills. Amended that 
lie co-operate with all Senators and Assemblymen 
favoring labor legislation. Motion to lay this mat- 
ter on the table was carried. 

The action of the Labor Council, as shown by the 
foregoing, was practically a vote of confidence in the 
men whose characters and methods bad been publicly 
assailed. However, the appearance of the Union 
Labor Assemblymen at the meeting of the Labor 
Council took place in the absence of the two men in 
question, a fact which undoubtedly influenced that 
body in refusing to concede the requests of the Union 
Labor men, when to have granted these requests 
would have been to condemn its own representatives 
without a hearing. In order, therefore, that the 
Labor Council might have a full and fair opportunity 
to pass upon the matter in all its aspects, a concise 
report of the situation up to that time was presented 
to the Labor Council at its meeting on February ti, 
1903. That report, which contains practically the 
entire authoritative record of the case, is as follows: 

In accordance with the instructions of the San 
Francisco Labor Council to its Law and Legislative 
Committee, to secure the introduction in the Legis- 
lature of the bills previously indorsed, Delegates R. 
1. W'isler and W. Macarthur, of the Law and Legis- 
lative Committee, went to Sacramento on January _', 
LAOS, and submitted the Anti-Injunction bill to As- 
semblyman-elect Grove L. Johnson, with the request 
that he introduce it. This Mr, Johnson agreed to do, 
expressly reserving to himself the right to offer any 
amendment which his later judgment might dictate. 
In submitting the bill to Mr. Johnson your repre- 
sentatives were guided by the knowledge of that 
gentleman's personal and political standing in the 
Legislature, a factor which promised to be an aid in 
securing the passage of the measure. Further, the 
fact that Mr. Johnson would in all probability be the 
Chairman of the Judiciary Committee of the Assem- 
bly, to which the bill was almost certain to be re- 
ferred, made it appear particularly desirable that we 
should secure for it the sponsorship of that gentle- 
man, rather than that of a possibly more friendly 
but less influential member of the Assembly. 

The bill was introduced in the Assembly by Mr. 
Johnson on January 13, 1903, and became Assembly 
Bill No. 72 (in the Senate by Senator Lukens — Sen- 
ate Bill Xo. 941. The lull was referred to the Judici- 
ary Committee, of which Mr. Johnson is Chairman. 
Delegates Wisler and .Macarthur appeared before that 
Committee on January 22, 1903, and were given an 
extended hearing. On January 28, 1903, the Com- 
mittee reported favorably upon the bill, with the fol- 
lowing amendment: 

"Provided, That nothing in this Act shall be con- 
strued to authorize force, violence or intimidation." 

Upon presentation of the Committee's report, Dele- 
gate Macarthur, being then in San Francisco, imme- 
diately consulted with Delegate Jones, the only other 
member of the Law and Legislative Committee whose 
advice could be obtained at the time, and these two 
called into consultation such members of the Labor 
Council as could then be reached. After a thorough 
consideration of the Judiciary Committee's amend- 
ment it was deemed wise to secure legal advice there- 
on, which was done. The advice thus obtained was 
uniformly to the effect that the amendment was im- 
material to the substance of the bill; that the amend- 
ment was a superfluity which in no way vitiated or 
modified the terms of the bill itself; that the amend- 
ment could not possibly be construed to work an 
aggravation of the evil sought to be remedied, and 
that it would be well to accept the bill, even with the 
amendment. 

Upon further consultation, and by and with the 
advice and instructions of the Executive Committee 
of the Labor Council, it was determined that Delegate 
Macarthur should again appear before the Judiciary 
Committee of the Assembly and endeavor to have the 
amendment stricken out. Accordingly, Delegate Mac- 
arthur appeared before that Committee on January 
29, 1903, and informed it of the Labor Council's objec- 
tion to the amendment and its desire that the same 
be stricken out by the Committee or voted down in 
the Assembly. 

The Judiciary Committee took no further action on 
the bill. The bill was made a special order in the 

(Continued on page 9.) 



The Seamen's Friends. 



In your excellent paper, the Coast Sea- 
mkx's Journal, which I always read, I was 
glad to note that it had a place in the reading 
rooms of the stations of the Society. The 
tone of the Coast Seamen's Journal is good 
and decidedly ethical; its literary style is 
sniK'rior to that of many religious papers and 
more pretentious journals. The Society finds 
it instructive and entertaining. Speaking as 
ihe Editor of the Society's publications, I 
wish to place it on record that the Coast Ska- 
mi \'s Journal is in my estimation a first- 
class paper, and should be on the reading- 
room table of every Bee nen's church or mis- 
sion reading-room. 

Not that I indorse all its views or the 
things that it advocates so strenuously. Sea- 
men's unions are like the Seamen's Friend 
Society, leagues below the plane of perfection, 
but following after the gleam. "My heart 
is upright before God," said a great preacher, 
and the hearts of the seamen's unions and 
Seamen's Friend Society, in spite of seeming 
divergence and apparent contrasts, "are up- 
right before God." 

That dear old baptized pagan countryman 
of mine, Thomas Carlyle, in comparing the 
work of Scott and Shakespeare, said they 
were both great artists, but Scott made his 
characters from the skin inward and Shakes- 
peare made his from the heart outward. The 
illustration, I think, conveys in a meastire the 
difference between our methods. Our aims 
are similar, but our methods differ widely. 
The seamen's unions are working from the 
outside and the American Seamen's Friend 
Society from the inside, and if I were a 
betting man instead of a sky-pilot, I would 
lay long odds on my side to win first. It is 
possible to put a man in a good, comfortable 
forecastle, clothe and feed him well, provide 
him with good wages and better hours, and 
the man he carnal, cruel and unkind, cringing 
td his superiors, unmanly to his equals, fall- 
ing tar short, in spite of bettered conditions 
and bettered outlook, of heing a true, help- 
ful, useful man to his family, shipmates and 
union. Every union officer knows this state- 
ment to be true. 

You work to get the sailor the power which 
he is getting more and more — power to com- 
mand better wages, accommodations, treat- 
ment and food — and we work to train the 
sailor by mental and moral culture to use 
that' power wisely and well, recognizing the 
grave danger there is in active ignorance. 
The seamen's chaplain and missionary were 
the friends of the sailor's betterment long be- 
fore seamen's unions were born ; they were the 
pioneers of the reforms now being carried 
out, the friend of the sailor before the sailor 
learned to befriend and help himself. Those 
old pioneers, such as Father Taylor, of Bos 
ton ; Rowell, of San Francisco, and Nicker- 
son, of Boston, blazed the way for unionism, 
not consciously but unconsciously. They 
built better than they knew when these men 
labored and prayed, asking God to make the 
sailor and his conditions better. The meth- 
ods God would use in bringing about their 
salvation were hid from their eyes, but union- 
ism undoubtedly is one of the methods. God 
always gives more than we ask. 

I am busy, but let me close with a story. 



In Scotland, where the men are as hale and 
as flinty as the rocks in the hills, there lived 
two hrothers in one house. And, as brothers 
often do, they quarreled. Each went out and 
in, silently passing and repassing, with never 
a nod nor look for each other. live and bye 
there arose the necessity for the roof to be 
re-thatched. The hrothers started from oppo- 
site sides at the bottom of the sloping roof 
and worked silently until they came to the 
to]), when their hands met and eyes looked 
into eyes. They met at the end of the work 
and the end of the day. Why should we 
quarrel 1 We are brothers; we are working 
on l>oth sides of the roof. We will meet at 
the end of the work and the end of the day, 
when the sailorman shall be patterned and 
finished after the pattern of the perfect man. 
George McPherson Hunteb, 
Secretary, Ladies' Seamen's Friend So- 
ciety, Xew York City. 



Divisions of Labor. 



In less than a generation there have been 

some phenomena] shift- and changes in the 
activities of this country, and we presume in 
the civilized world generally, although no- 
where else are they so marked as here. The 
old basic occupations have shown a .shrink- 
age, at least with reaped to the number of 
persons engaged in them. 

This is true to a larger extent of agricul- 
ture than of almost anything else, although 
the increased use of machinery probably more 
than offsets in the n suits the reduced per- 
sonality. A comparison of the figures of 
1880 and 1900 shows very interesting and 
significant changes for the double decade. 
Domestic and personal Bervice has fallen off, 
indicating a tendency toward contraction of 
the home life. The professions have increas- 
ed normally, although the proportion of law- 
yers is considerably larger than that of doc- 
tors, which may account for the fact that the 
average individual rewards in the latter pro- 
fession are larger than in the former. 

Women have taken a more prominent place 
in the ranks of the world's workers than ever 
before. The number engaged in various occu- 
pations has increased from 2,647. 1 "> 7 in 1SS0 
to 5,319,397 in 1900, or over 100 per cent, 
while the increase in the number of men has 
been only about 61 per cent. The demand 
for entertainment and amusement is reflected 
in the fact that the number of actors and 
showmen has increased in twenty years 
367.30 per cent, and literary pursuits 507.87 
per cent, although in the dramatic profession 
and the literary world there are no such 
shining lights as studded the more contracted 
firmament of the previous generation. 

Artists have swollen their ranks by 173.21 
per cent, and architects, designers and 
draughters by 360.43. The dentists show a 
growth in numbers of 140.90 per cent, and 
journalists of 144.05. But the profes-i<n 
that leads them all is that of electrical ami 
civil engineering, which has attained the 
phenomenal growth of 1,037.34 per cent. — 
Boston Transcript. 






The stroke of a lion's paw is the third 
strongest force in the animal world. The 
first is the blow of a whale's tail, the second 
the kick of a giraffe. 



-^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







O n the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 




The "No-Money Clause." 

The "Seamen's Federation," composed of 
a number of shipping-offices along the Coast 
supported by funds from the treasury of the 
Atlantic Carriers' Association, was originally 
formed for the avowed purpose of crushing 
the "pernicious Seamen's Union," not for 
the purpose of fighting the principles for 
Avhich the said "pernicious" organization 
stands. The Carriers' Association, through 
its press committee, went to considerable 
trouble and expense to inform the public that 
it was as heartily in favor of fair wages and 
liberal treatment to seamen as any body of 
business men could be. 

The Association took particular pains to 
emphasize the point that the scale of wages 
for seamen established by the Seamen's Union 
was perfectly satisfactory to every one of 
its members. Also, it went without saying 
that a body of such highly respectable citi- 
zens as the Atlantic Carriers' Association 
would cheerfully comply with every require- 
ment of the law regulating the shipment, dis- 
charge, etc., of seamen. The "Seamen's Fed- 
eration" was simply a device to counteract 
the high-handed methods of the Seamen's 
Union and to expose the fallacy of the lat- 
ter's assumption that union seamen are the 
best and should, therefore, be given the pref- 
erence in the shipment of crews. The mem- 
bers of the Carriers' Association were firm 
believers in the freedom and sacredness of 
contract and of the inalienable right of every 
man to sell his labor to whoever and for 
whatever wage he sees fit. On this subject 
in particular they waxed eloquent, and the 
reporters for the daily papers were invariably 
impressed with the obvious fact that here 
was a body of patriotic citizens whose lib- 
erty-loving sentiments unmistakably pro- 
claimed them Hamiltonian Jeffersonians, 
imbued with purest wooden-nutmeg ideals. 

x\nd so the "Seamen's Federation" was 
launched on its mission of destruction. Mas- 
ters of vessels were informed that at any 
of the Federation's shipping-offices they could 
secure crews warranted non-union in person, 
character, deportment, ability and clothing. 
No "shipping-fees" were to be levied, of 
course — only teaming and traveling ex- 
penses, etc. Things went along reasonably 
well for a while, until the masters of non- 
Association vessels began to kick about pay- 
ing union wages to non-union seamen. If 
they had to pay union wages, they argued, 
they might as well have the benefit of the 
services of good, experienced union seamen. 
The President of the "Seamen's Federation," 
after looking up pertinent precedents, ruled 
that the point was extremely well taken. A 
horizontal cut in seamen's wages, amounting 
to $5 per month, was accordingly made to 
meet the issue raised by the shipmasters. 

It was thought that in this way two birds 
could be slain with one stone. First, the 
shipmasters would be mollified; and, sec- 
ondly, the Seamen's Union would lose all its 
shipping. The scheme, however, did not 
pan out as well as had been anticipated. 



The greater number of shipmasters on the 
Coast, after one or two trials with the non- 
union brand of seamen, reluctantly came to 
the conclusion that it was both cheaper and 
safer in the long run to employ union sea- 
men, even though these came a trifle higher. 
Again, men willing to sail for the reduced 
rate of wages were found to be far from 
plentiful. Delays in the sailing of their ves- 
sels were frequent, and it was no uncommon 
thing for shipmasters thus inconvenienced 
to send direct to the Seamen's Union for 
their crews, at the same time declaring that 
they were "through with the Federation." 
Things began to look gloomy for the "Federa- 
tion," and, to add to its embarrassment, the 
hateful Seamen's Union went around with 
a chip on its shoulder, daring the scab pro- 
moters to knock it off. It became more and 
more evident that something besides reducing 
wages would have to be done, or they might 
as well close up shop and go home. In this 
dilemma some member of the Carriers' Asso- 
ciation bethought himself of Section 4530 of 
the Revised Statutes, which reads in part : 

Every seaman on a vessel of the United States 
shall be entitled to receive from the master of the 
vessel to which he belongs one-half part of the wages 
which shall be due him at every port where such 
vessel, after the voyage has commenced, shall load 
or deliver cargo before the voyage is ended, unless 
the contrary be expressly stipulated in the contract. 

For years after the enactment of this law 
masters of vessels used to take advantage of 
the last-mentioned proviso, "unless the con- 
trary be expressly stipulated in the contract," 
and caused the following clause to be in- 
serted in the shipping agreement : 

No money in port except at master's option. 

This was known among seamen as the "No- 
Money Clause," which, of course, completely 
defeated the intention of the law by convert- 
ing a right of one party to the agreement into 
an option of the other party. The Seamen's 
Union at last took up the matter and, after 
a referendum vote, decided that its members 
would no longer sign agreements containing 
the "No-Money Clause." When the"Seamen's 
Federation" first went into the business 
of shipping crews it stole all the thunder of 
the Seamen's Union wage scale, "No-Money 
Clause" and all. Then, as shown above, it 
was forced to reduce wages, and now the 
word is being passed around among masters 
of vessels that agreements will be made out 
in the shipping-offices of the "Federation" 
containing the "No-Money Clause." This 
move, it is calculated, will bring quite a lot of 
shipping to the "Federation" from shipmas- 
ters who for various reasons want the "No- 
Money Clause" inserted in the agreements 
with their crews. 

And so the matter stands, at present, the 
Seamen's Union insisting upon the "No- 
Money Clause," and the "Federation" con- 
ceding it. It will thus be seen that the 
"American Seamen's Federation" instead of 
looking after the interests of its "members" 
has actually aligned itself with the shipmas- 
ters and vesselowners. But then, no seaman 
in these parts expected anything else, so there 



is no disappointment coming to anyone. The 
"Seamen's Federation" is not by any means 
the first organization of its kind which has 
tried to do crooked business on a straight 
basis. As for the "No-Money Clause," ship- 
masters should remember that insistence upon 
it on their part will, rightly or wrongly, be 
interpreted as meaning that they are not 
above making profits out of the necessities 
of the seamen under them. 



Shipping Notes. 

The vesselowners on the Atlantic Coast are 
still too busy devising ways and means to 
down the Seamen's Union to pool their issues 
in an effort to maintain decent living freights. 
As they have not enough sense to do this, it 
becomes more than ever incumbent upon the 
organized seamen to continue their efforts to 
maintain decent living wages for themselves. 

William H. Frazier, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the International Seamen's Union, has at- 
tended a meeting of the Executive Council of 
the American Federation of Labor, held for 
the purpose of discussing the present rela- 
tions between the Seamen and Longshoremen 
with regard to the question of jurisdiction 
over certain organizations. Results are not 
yet officially known. 

The building of ocean tow-barges has fallen 
off, as compared with that of schooners. The 
reason is that it has begn found that over 
short coastwise routes large five and six- 
masted schooners can carry cargoes profitably 
at a freight rate which can not be touched 
by anything afloat. This seems to prove the 
truth of the old adage that every evil evolves 
its own remedy, and the barge evil may yet 
be superseded by the lesser evil of giant ships 
disguised as schooners. 



Shipping in sail tonnage on the Atlantic 
Coast has seemingly touched the low-water 
mark and is now slowly improving. The 
prospects for the fall and winter trade are 
still uncertain, however, and will remain in 
that condition until after the election. 
Freight rates are rather better than might 
be expected after the business depression of 
the last four months, and late pharters of 
vessels indicate that the improvement of trade 
noted is general rather than sporadic. Alto- 
gether the outlook may be said to be hopeful, 
if not positively reassuring. 

Comrade Nath, organizer for the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union, was assaulted in New 
Orleans and nearly drowned by members of 
the local organization of marine firemen. 
Fred Wassersleben was arrested on a charge 
of inciting to riot, preferred by George Haw- 
thorne, brother of Secretary Hawthorne, of 
the New Orleans Sailors' and Firemen's 
Union. The trouble originated in the ill- 
feeling that has been created by the pending 
controversy between the International Sea- 
men's Union and the International Long- 
shoremen's Union on the subject of jurisdic- 
tion. 

(Continued on page 10.) 



4 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Home News. 



Great strikes of valuable ores are said 
to have been made in Colorado recently. 

Indians threaten to boycott the new 
Grovernmenl schools in Indian Territory 
if negro children are permitted to attend. 

The independent telephone companies 
of Philadelphia, l'a., arc preparing to 
form an association for mutual protec- 
t ion. 

The public schools of Philadelphia, 
l'a., are greatly overcrowded and thou- 
Bands of pupils have been put on half 

t illlc. 

six members of a family recently per- 
ished in a New York tenement lire which 
is believed to have been of incendiary 

'■1 iiMU. 

Seven persons were killed and over 
thirty injured by a wreck on the Wa- 
bash Railroad near Pendleton, Mo., on 
September 6. 

A Canadian Pacific express train was 
recently held up in Manitoba by four 
men, who dynamited the express car and 
secured $6000. 

The real estate taxes collected in Phil- 
adelphia, Pa., in August aggregated $6,- 
952,000, the largest amount ever paid 
in that city in one month. 

The State of Tennessee has begun suit 
againsl the Standard Oil Company on the 
charge of violating the Anti-Trust law. 
The specific charge is bribery. 

Fifty-four persons were killed, and 
many others injured, in a head-on col- 
lision on the Southern Railway near 
HodgeB, Tenn., on September 24. 

John Ware, a negro, was lynched in 
Franklin county, Ga., on September 18, 
for fatally shooting C. Y. Daniel, a son 
of George Daniel, of Danielsville. 

Robert M. McWade, United States 
Consul-General at Canton, China, has 
been removed from office by President 
Roosevelt on charges of malfeasance. 

The largest fire since 1899 occurred 
at Dawson City, N. W. T., on September 
23. The loss is estimated at a quarter 
of a million dollars, with no insurance. 

Nine schoolgirls were smothered to 
death by falling into a cesspool on the 
grounds of the Pleasant Ridge school- 
house, near Cincinnati, O., on Septem- 
ber 23. 

Henry G. Davis, Democratic candidate 
for Vice President, 81 years old, and 
ex-Governor William Pinckney Whyte, 
of Maryland, 80 years old, will stump 
West Virginia together. 

On the farm of C. L. McKay, of Moor- 
land township. Mich., was unearthed re- 
cently the skeleton of an extinct mam- 
moth of enormous proportions which 
probably inhabited this continent in pre- 
historic times. 

It is reported that the American 
Bridge Company and the Pennsylvania 
Steel Company are figuring on a con- 
tract to construct a bridge to cost $4,- 
000,000 across the river Ganges for the 
Indian Government. 

It has been recommended that the 
force of American troops in the Philip- 
pine Islands be reduced from its present 
standing of four regiments of cavalry 
and nine of infantry to three regiments 
of cavalry and seven of infantry. 

In the Superior Court at Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., on September 17, Judge 
Xewham sentenced James McCool and 
J. Clark Slocum, who pleaded guilty to 
bribery, in the Lake Michigan water 
deal, at the last term of court, fining 
them $500 each. This is the amount of 
the bribe they were charged with having 
taken. 

Stockholders of the Continental, Con- 
solidated and American Tobacco com- 
panies have been notified that a meet- 
ing will be held in New York on Sep- 
tember 30, at which a complete merger 
of the three companies will be voted 
upon. The proposed new company will 
control the entire tobacco business of 
the country. 



SAN PEDRO, CAI. 



BRILLIANT'S 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods .Manufactured for 

Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION I.IIIEI, ON OUK GOODS ALSO 



lippmain bros. 

New Clothing Store 

Goods Direct from the Factory. 
UINIOIN STORE U^JIOIN GOODS 

Wieldwald Block, Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAIN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

Wholesale Dealer in the Choicest of Old Wines 

and Liquors 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at the lowest Sun Francisco prices. 
We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beneon Street, near Fourth. S A > PEDRO, CAI* 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
a little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spending 
all you earn, but save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 
splendid opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San 
Francisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that. We offer you lots on 
graded streets with cement sidewalks and nubs, trees planted and water laid 
in, from $350 to $450, at the exceptionally easy terms of $25 cash and $10 
per month until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for 
your lot it will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity 
slip by, but see John Anderson, next door to the new postofik-e. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



JOHN HELANDER 

— Dealer in — 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CIGARS 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon StM., San Pedro, t'al. 

— Dealers in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Herald and all San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

BRAND A LAWYER 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausage of all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by TJ. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Headquarter)* for Pore Drim-s. Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT STREET, OPP. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAX PEDRO, CAL. 



Q. W. HARVEY 

The old Time Expressman 

Solicits Your Patronage. 

Give iiim a Call. 

Stand at Front St., San Pedro, Cnl. 



FRED SYENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 
AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELIAS WEBERG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

s \ \ PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Clears, Tobaccos, Mpes, 

NotlonM, Etc. 



People's Bargain Store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' I in -wishing Goods, BootH and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
I ,ii(.. Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



S. W. Express 

HANS HENRIKSEN, Proprietor. 

Give your old Comrade a call 
when in San Pedro 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

— Dealer in — 

GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN, also GREEN 

FRUITS and COUNTRY PRODUCE 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL 

OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS 

OF N. A. 



When you are buying- a FUR HAT, either soft or 
stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
in it. The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 
four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
using them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President. Orange. N. J. 
MARTIN l. \ w I, mi. Secretary, 11 Waverlj Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS. CAPS, F.te. 

VISION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union -made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, K I C. 

Call at his old Ked Stand on 
WATER ST, PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman ft Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union 
Of3ce. 



Chas. Eisenbeis. 



F. W. Eisenbeis. 



E1SENBEIS & SON 

— Dealers in — 
(JKOCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Crackera. 

Ships - Stores a Specialty. 
:t1tl Water St. Port Townsend, Waxli. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chu. E Coon, Pres 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (inc.) 

Wholei lie b nd Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Tovtuscnd, Wash. 

Warehouse: Ilartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

WHOLESALE AM) III. I' Ml. DEALERS 

l\ GENERAL MERCHANDISE]. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
..nl Outfits, etc., etc. Honest and 
illng Is nur motto. 



MAX GERSON 

— Dealer in — 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
■ 1.1 Water St.. next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Dealers in LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS and 

VEGETABLES. Wholesale and Retail. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 

FORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL,. 



C. L. MUNSON 

— Dealer in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, opposite 8. P. Depot, 

SAX PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A LUCAS 

UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Tom Courtney, of Courtmaesherry, 
County Cork, Ireland, is inquired for by 
the liiitish Consulate at San Francisco, 
Cal. 

\Yilli;nn Hansen, a cook who left the 
schooner Ethel Zane about three months 
ago in Everett, Wash., is inquired for 
by his wife. Any one knowing of his 
whereabouts please address Box 2155, 
San Pedro, Gal. 

The following named seamen are in- 
quired for by the Consulate of Sweden 
and Norway at San Francisco: Harry 
Nilsen, from Askerj Williaw Anderson, 
from Stockholm; Emil Swanson, from 
Gothenburg; E. Q, Persaon, from Goth 
enburg; -Lilian Emil Engebrektson, from 
Gothenburg; George Nordstrom, from 
tiania; Jacob II. Dalhvnd, from 
Siglevik; Olof M. Nelson, from Sweden; 
Frithjof EUingsen, from Drammen; Jo- 
hannes Gudmundsen, from Stayanger; 
K. A. Kolderup Weasel, from Chris- 

tiania; .Lilian Sander Peterson, from 

Brunnefjall; Ed. B. Herwan, from Stock' 
holm; Edwin Bredesen. from Chris 
tiania; Gustav Hansen, from Aakenes; 
Martin Olsen. from Vatteroen; John E. 
W. Johanson, from Kaatlosa; F. M. Lof- 
berg, from Partille. 



^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



" 



jfi Pacific Coast Marine. |j{ 



The French ship Vauban sailed from San Francisco 
last week for Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of scrap steel 
valued at $20,000. 

A recent report from Seattle, Wash., says that 
three Alaska natives have found ambergris weighing 
100 pounds, valued at $64,000. 

The American ship St. Francis, now on the Sound, 
has been chartered by W. R. Grace & Co. to carry 
lumber to Antofagasta, Chile. 

The Great Northern liner Minnesota, intended for 
service between Puget Sound and the Orient, has 
sailed from Norfolk, Va., for San Francisco. 

A boat from the British ship Blytheswood, now at 
Royal Roads, B. C, capsized on September 25, and 
four persons, including the second-mate of the 
Blytheswood, were drowned. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on September 
20 reported the safe arrival (if the barkentine Robert 
Sudden at Santa Rosalia on the 23d. Some anxiety 
had been felt for the vessel. 

The Russian ship Glenard, now in San Francisco, 
has been re-chartered by the firms of Eddy, Falk & 
Co. and the American Trading Company, and will 
carry lumber hence for Melbourne. 

It is reported that $10,000 was the sum paid for 
salving the British ship Ditton, which was recently 
hauled oft' the beach south of San Francisco by the 
tugboats Defiance, Dauntless and Sea Fox. 

Salvage on the British ship Corunna, recently 
ashore at Miramar, on the east coast of South 
America, has been abandoned. About 200 tons of the 
cargo was saved, but the rest, it appears, has been 
losL 

The barkentine Ruth was brought from Oakland 
Creek to San Francisco last week to be converted into 
a coal hulk for the Western Fuel Company. The 
Ruth was built at Sunderland, Eng., in 1800, and was 
first known as the bark Sharpshooter. 

A mysterious warship which was reported on Sep- 
tember 24 as making queer maneuvers off the Golden 
Gate and finally speeding off to the southward is be- 
lieved to have been the British cruiser Flora, which 
left Esquimault on September 20 for Acapulco. 

Pierre Barlow Cornwall, who was the last surviv- 
ing member of the first Legislature of California, a 
pioneer citizen of San Francisco, and for many years 
prominent in shipping and political circles in that 
city, died on September 25, aged eighty-two years. 

The new steam-schooner Northland, from Portland, 
Or., to San Pedro, Cal., via San Francisco, on her 
maiden voyage, went ashore on the Monterey coast 
on September 18, but afterward floated and was 
lowed back to San Francisco in a waterlogged condi- 
tion. 

It is reported that Diver Roach has begun the 
work of salving what remains of the British ship 
Giflord, which went ashore and was wrecked a short 
distance south of San Francisco last year while bound 
to that port from Newcastle, Australia, with a cargo 
of coal. 

The Union Iron Works, of San Francisco, were sold 
in that city on September 26, by order of the courts. 
Charles M. Schwab, acting for the reorganized Ship- 
building Trust, was the only bidder, and the price 
paid was $1,700,000, the minimum figure set by the 
courts. 

The Chilean training ship General Baquedano ar- 
rived at San Francisco on September 26, forty-five 
days from Yokohama. The vessel carries forty-three 
officers and a crew of 337, mostly cadets of the 
Chilean navy, and has been making a leisurely voyage 
to Asiatic countries. 

The Pacific Mail liner Siberia, for several weeks 
in drydock at Hunter's Point, San Francisco, under- 
going repairs to her stern frame, will return to the 
Mail dock this week. She will begin loading a cargo 
soon afterward for the Orient, but the date of her 
departure has not yet been fixed. 

Two hundred carloads of steel rails have arrived 
at Tacoma, Wash., from Pennsylvania, for shipment 
to the Orient, and 200 or 300 carloads are due to 
arrive in a few days. Two tramp steamers will take 
the rails to Yokohama. It is understood that the 
ultimate destination of the steel is Corea. 

As a result of their investigation into the causes 
of the explosion on the oil tank steamer George 
Loomis, at Portsmouth, Or., on September 17, local 
Steamship Inspectors Edwards and Fuller, of Port- 
land, have suspended for thirty days the license of 
Martin Cradrich, chief engineer of the steamer. 

The bark Yosemite, twenty-four days from Bristol 
Bay. Alaska, arrived at San Francisco on September 
24, with a cargo of 1,040 barrels of salmon, consigned 
to the Alaska Peninsular Company. The catch of 
salmon was light at all tne northern canneries this 
season, the Yosemite coming back to port with a 
much lighter cargo than was expected. 

The steamer Hero, for some time employed as a 
collier between Puget Sound and San Francisco has 
been chartered by Puget Sound parties and has sailed 
for Tacoma to load. Much secrecy is observed re- 
garding this charter, and the fact gives rise to the 
belief that the vessel is to carry contraband goods to 
the Orient. The Hero flies the Norwegian flag. 

Captain T. V. Hogan, who ran the coasting steamer 
Maggie on the beach near the Cliff House, San Fran- 
cisco, September 4, during a heavy fog, was last 
week found guilty by Local Steamship Inspectors 
John K. Bulger ang O. F. Bolles of unskillful and 
negligent navigation of his steamer. His license as 
master and pilot was suspended for four months. 

Captain Reid, of the schooner Okanogan, has re- 
ported to the branch Hydrographic Office at San 



Francisco that on June 20 he passed within 500 feet 
of a rock over which the sea was breaking heavily, 
in latitude 32 degrees north, longitude 139 degrees 3 
seconds east. The schooner was bound from Manila 
for Puget Sound, and the rock mentioned was not 
far from the Asiatic coast. 

Repairs to the steamer Shawmut, which went 
ashore in Hongkong harbor some weeks ago, will cost 
more than was originally estimated. A recent tele- 
gram reported that the cost would be $82,500, includ- 
ing dock fees, plus the price of a new stern frame. 
Thirty-five days' time will be required to complete 
the work. The Shawmut has been plying between 
Puget Sound and the Orient. 

The Fish Commission steamer Albatross, Captain 
Swift, will sail from San Francisco on October 1 for 
the South Pacific Ocean, by way of Panama, where 
Professor Agassiz will be taken aboard. After leav- 
ing the Isthmus the Albatross will proceed to the 
Peruvian coast, and thence to numerous islands in 
the South Sea, where a study will be made of coral 
reef formation. It will be several months before the 
Albatross returns to San Francisco. 

The new steamer Helen P. Drew arrived at San 
Francisco on September 26, in tow of the steamer 
Santa Barbara, eighty-eight hours from Gray's Har- 
bor, Wash. The Drew comes to have her machinery 
installed, and will afterward engage in the coasting 
trade. Having cost about $75,000, she is classed as a 
very good steam-schooner, and is the property of the 
L. E. White Lumber Company. The vessel is 144 feet 
long, 32 feet in breadth and 10.5 feet in depth. 

The American ship Henry B. Hyde, which was 
ashore for a long time near the Dam Neck Life-Sav- 
ing Station, and only a few days ago reported to have 
been floated and on the way to Norfolk, broke her 
hawsers during a gale and again went ashore near the 
same place. The crew of eight men were saved. The 
Henry B. Hyde is owned by the California Shipping 
Company, of San Francisco. The dispatches gave no 
indication of her prospects of being finally saved. 

A pilot chart for the North Pacific Ocean, a very 
valuable publication to navigators, has just been 
issued by the United States Hydrographic Office. It 
follows after the pilot chart for the North Atlantic, 
which has become an almost indispensable companion 
to the Western Ocean navigator. Like the latter, the 
Pacific chart contains the forecast of weather at sea 
for October, an exhaustive article on typhoons in East 
Asiatic waters, Equatorial crossings for sailing vessels 
and storm tracks. 

Exceptionally long pasages were made by the 
schooners Albion and Oceania Vance, reaching their 
destinations on September 22 in ballast. The Albion 
was thirty-seven days from San Francisco to Siuslaw 
River, Or., and the Oceania Vance, arriving at San 
Francisco, occupied twenty-four days on the passage 
from San Diego. Periods of calm are principally re- 
sponsible for the long passages, and on the northern 
coast the smoke from forest fires was of no advantage 
to navigators trying to make port. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on September 20: British schooner Ad- 
vance, 54 days from a Mississippi port for Venezuela, 
30 per cent; British ship Bardowie, 167 days from 
Gcclong for Falmouth, 15 per cent; British bark 
Shakespeare, 124 days from the west coast of South 
America for Barbadoes, 8 per cent; British ship 
Crown of Germany, 69 days from Shanghai for Royal 
Roads, 5 per cent; French bark Moliere, 61 days from 
Shanghai for Royal Roads, 5 per cent. 

A new schooner to be known as the St. Michael, 
for French owners, and to be used in the South Sea 
trade, is nearly ready for launching from the Turner 
yards at Benicia, Cal. The new steam-schooner 
Helen P. Drew was launched from a yard at Ho- 
quiam a few days ago for the L. E. White Lumber 
Company. The vessel cost $75,000, and is well 
equipped. A new four-masted schooner to be named 
the Ensign has been launched from an Everett 
(Wash.) yard for C. R. McCormick & Co. 

■Mill— Hill m^— — — I— — ^— ■ 
DIED. 
Axel Edwall, No. 337, a native of Sweden, aged 25, 
drowned at Pyramid Harbor, Alaska, on August 29, 
1904. 



Wilh. Beguhl, a native of Germany, and J. Rob- 
erts, a native of England, are requested to call at 
office of the United States Shipping Commissioner 
for money due them from the ship Shenandoah. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine 
law in this city. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Rooms 8 and 10, 508 California 
street. Telephone Grant 103. 

Geo. E. Nalder, a member of the Sailors' Union, 
No. 555, is inquired for. Anyone knowing anything 
as to his present whereabouts please notify the 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Information is wanted regarding the whereabouts 
of Sam Larkin, at one time sailing from San Fran- 
cisco. Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 



liagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches, and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



MAM 

row 






OFFICIAL 





SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 20, 1904. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., John Pearson presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping dull. A Quarterly Finance Committee was 
elected. A committee of three was elected to pre- 
pare the ballot for delegates to the International 
Seamen's Union convention. 

A. Furusetii, Secretary. 
S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping very dull; pros- 
pects poor. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Red 208. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
Shipping dull ; prospects poor ; many men ashore. 
The Shipwreck Benefit was paid to ten members of 
the crew of the steamer City of Topeka. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; prospects 
poor. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
88 y 2 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. No. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
Shipping rather dull. 

Wm. Goiil, Agent. 
N. E. cor. F and Heron sts. P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

D. W. Paul, Agent. 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood No. 352. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 18, 1904. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

J. W. Ericksen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 327. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor: many men ashore. 

H. Oiilsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 178. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 12, 1904. 
Situation unchanged. 

F. Larsen, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' 
ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 22, 1904. 
The regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
i 8 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull. Shipwreck Benefit was ordered 
to be paid to thirteen members on the steamer City 
of Topeka, which sunk alongside the wharf in Seattle. 
Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 15, 1904. 
Shipping on steamers good; sailing ships poor. 

R. Powers, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 15, 1904. 
Shipping good; prospects fair. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Sept. 19, 1904. 
Shipping dull, with a normal supply of men ashore. 
Voted for delegates to International Seamen's Union 
convention. 

Wm. Penje, Secretary. 

Tona wanda (N. Y.) Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 
Shipping slack; many men ashore. Voted for dele- 
gates to International Seamen's Union convention. 
Thomas Lester, Agent. 
152 Main st. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Providence (R. I.) Agency, Sept. 20, 1904. 
Shipping fair; quite a number of men ashore. 

James Wilson, Agent. 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Agency, Sept. 19, 1904. 

Shipping very dull; prospects uncertain. 

H. Atkinson, Agent. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1904. 
Shipping slow; general situation unchanged 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's 
Journal 



Published Weekly by 
THE SAILORS' UNION Of THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR. . .Editor | P. SCHARRENBERO, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail, - $2.00 | Six months, - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday noon 
of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should address 
all communications of a business nature to the Business 
Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second-class 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, south- 
west corner East and Mission streets, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the Journal provided they are of general interest, 
brief, legible, written on one side only of the paper, and 
accompanied by the writer's name and address. The 
Journal is not responsible for the expressions of cor- 
respondents, nor for the return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



- SEPTEMBER 28, 1904. 



VOLUME XVIII. 



With this issue the Coast Seamen's 
Jotjrnax begins the eighteenth year of its 
publication. In expressing the customary 
word of appreciation of the favors shown us 
in the past by advertisers, readers and con- 
temporaries, we would repeat, for the eight- 
eenth time, our determination to make the 
paper as honest, clean and fair as the cause 
it stands for and as intelligent as care and 
capacity will permit. That's all. 



THOSE FRIENDS OF OURS. 



The JoritNAL is pleased to print in this 
issue a communication from the Rev. Mr. 
Hunter, Secretary of the Ladies' Seamen's 
Friend Society. It will be observed that 
the gentleman takes a pardonable pride in 
claiming for his organization precedence 
over the seamen's unions in the work of res- 
cuing the members of that craft from the 
world, the flesh and the devil, etc. As to 
that claim, it might be pointed out that to 
admit it is to raise the question of the rela- 
tive results achieved by the Society and by 
the unions. But, after all, that question is 
not worth discussing. Neither is the question 
as to which organization works from the out- 
side and which from the inside. The only 
material point is that both organizations are 
working together, not against each other. 
So far as the organized seamen are con- 
cerned, we may say that they entertain no 
prejudices against the spiritual adviser or 
his teachings ; whatever feeling may have 
been expressed in that connection has grown 
out of a suspicion, based upon more or less 
tangible grounds, that the spiritual adviser 
was rather inclined to take sides in the pure- 
ly worldly affairs of the seamen and his em- 
ployer, and to take sides with the latter. Of 
course, the seaman may have been wrong in 
this — it's largely a matter of the point of 
view, you know. Anyway, the olive branch 
extended by the Journal's correspondent is 
gladly received, with the assurance that it 
will be well cared for. 



A SINGLE-TAXER'S VIEWS. 



It is suggested by a Chicago paper that the pack- 
ing-houses, instead of punishing the strikers by 
ignoring their union after the strike fails, punish 
them by restraining the annoyances with which 
unions often irritate employers. The newspaper in 
question evidently fails to grasp the significance of 
the packing house strike. It was forced upon the 
emplo3 - es in the first place by the packers, who in- 
sisted upon reducing a rate of wages already down 
to the life line. Circumstances obliged the packers 
to compromise, but their compromise was only a 
pretense. They purposely forced a renewal of the 
strike by treating the returning men in a manner 
which made its instant renewal inevitable. The true 
meaning of it all is that a well-planned war upon 
labor unions is on foot, of which the forced packing- 
house strike is the first battle. When unionism in 
the packing-houses is broken up, unionism somewhere 
else will be attacked in a similar manner; the ulti- 
mate object being to place workingmen at the mercy 
of the employers' organizations which are being or- 
ganized everywhere. 

Perhaps the destruction of unions, the undoubted 
object of this crusade, will prove in the end to be a 
good thing. Labor unions are a weak force with 
which to fight legalized monopolies. They necessitate 
antiquated and irritating modes of fighting. And if 
it were possible for them to win, their power when 
they won would be. intolerable. Were they broken 
up, however, their membership might perceive that 
there are better ways of protecting the rights of work- 
ingmen than by labor unions and labor strikes. They 
might realize that the industrial war is really not 
between labor and capital, but between rights ami 
privileges. Through this awakening, a successful 
political combination of industrial interests against 
parasitical interests might eventuate. — The Public, 
Chicago, 111. 

"Perhaps the destruction of unions, the 
undoubted object of this crusade, will prove 
in the end to be a good thing!" Good for 
who or what, may we ask ? Does the Public 
mean that the "destruction of unions" would 
prove a good thing for the Single Tax? If 
so, we would suggest that the destruction of 
the Single Tax would prove a still better 
thing for the world at large. 

The view of the Public is an illustration, 
although rather more bluntly expressed than 
usual, of the peculiar affinity that seems to 
exist between the certain "reforms" and the 
avowed enemies of all reform. Here we 
have a paper published in the interest main- 
ly of a reform, to wit, the Single Tax, which 
is represented to be the most beneficent and 
far-reaching of all reforms, practically tak- 
ing the same position toward trade-unionism 
as that held by the most virulent anti-labor 
sheets. At first blush this attack seems in- 
explicable; but upon reflection the thing be- 
comes perfectly clear. Trade-unionism, as 
the most powerful, practical and progressive 
institution in the entire category of social 
reform, is the natural object of envy among 
theorists, idealists, dreamers and poli- 
ticians. By accomplishing material results 
for the great mass of the workers, the trade- 
union stands in the way of the visionary re- 
former. So long as the worker is assured 
the protection of a trade-union he does not 
feel the need of this or that empiric. Even 
those trade-unionists who are now associated 
with the "radical," "fundamental" and 
"progressive" reforms take good care to re- 
tain membership in the trade-unions of their 
crafts, since they know that however much 
other reform organizations may gratify their 
longings for a better world, the trade-union 
alone satisfies their bread-and-butter needs. 

The destruction of the unions is a hopeless 
dream. The "well-planned war upon labor 



unions" will come to nothing. Trade-union- 
ism is just as necessary to the maintenance 
of free society as government itself, and it 
will last just as long. Even if every other 
condition that makes trade-unionism neces- 
sary were removed, that institution would 
still be needed for the protection of the work- 
ers from the Single-Taxers and other reform- 
ers of the same variety. And this, of course, 
is not saying a word against the Single-Tax 
as a measure designed for the redress of cer- 
tain patent evils in the industrial system. 



BOOMING THE LABEL. 

The Labor Clarion, of San Francisco, an- 
nounces the issuance of the "Union Label 
Bulletin," a publication compiled at the in- 
stance of the Labor Council of that city. In 
this connection the Labor Clarion says : 

The LJnion Label Bulletin contains fac- 
similes (in colors) of thirty-four labels, 
stamps, store and shop cards in use by unions 
of this city, together with descriptive matter 
explaining where the labels and stamps are 
to be found on products, and other informa- 
tion of similar import. The Bulletin (which 
is 3 by 5 inches in size, 64 pages), contains 
considerable general information of an in- 
teresting character, including census statis- 
tics, calendars for 1904-05, rates of postage, 
a condensed parliamentary manual, list of 
Presidents of the United States, electoral vote 
of the States, etc., and there are a number 
of blank pages which may be used for mem- 
oranda. Bright and pointed union-label 
paragraphs are scattered throughout the 
booklet, and comprise one of its most inter- 
esting features. On the whole, the Label 
Bulletin may fairly be said to be the best 
publication of the kind ever compiled in the 
country, and it has received the unqualified 
commendation of all who have seen it.- 

Enough of these Label Bulletins will be 
printed to supply each member of the unions 
of San Francisco with a copy. 

The principal object in issuing the Label 
Bulletin was to familiarize union men and 
women with the form of the labels, stamps, 
store and shop cards in use by sister unions, 
thereby enabling them to guard against the 
deception constantly being practiced by un- 
scrupulous dealers and manufacturers who 
make use of counterfeit union labels. In 
this respect the Bulletin will undoubtedly 
prove to be all its promoters anticipate. * * * 

That the labor unionists of San Francisco 
might he given an opportunity to concentrate 
the unorganized and therefore unnecessarily 
expensive and, on the whole, ineffective label 
agitation that has been conducted in the past, 
the Label Committee of the Labor Council 
has planned a union label campaign in which 
the compiling and publication of the Label 
Bulletin is but the beginning. The conven- 
tion which has been called to meet on Tues- 
day, October 4th, will bring together, for 
one common object, representatives of all 
the unions which have adopted the label sys- 
tem — and that object is to formulate meas- 
ures whereby, through the union label, the 
purchasing power of the 75,000 labor union- 
ists of San Francisco will be controlled and 
directed to the advantage of each and all of 
them — to the end that they may be able to 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



secure and maintain conditions affecting 
their employment that will insure to them 
a fair day's wage for a fair day's work. 



The call issued hy the American Federa- 
tion of Labor for the forthcoming convention 
of that body should be acted upon by every 
affiliated body in the West and particularly 
on the Pacific Slope. The meeting of the 
convention in San Francisco presents an op- 
portunity, one that, in the nature of things, 
must be rare, to secure a complete presenta- 
tion of Western labor conditions to the rep- 
resentatives of the entire labor movement. 
It is to be hoped that the fullest possible 
advantage will be taken of the present oppor- 
tunity. 

The trade-union was conceived in the need 
for some power which would, so far as possi- 
ble, equalize the terms upon which the re- 
spective factors in industry stand toward each 
other. After many years of struggle for the 
"right to organize," the trade-union has es- 
tablished itself as a constituent of society 
and as an indispensable instrument in the 
preservation of the worker's rights as a 
worker. 



Bound and indexed copies of Volume 
XVI [ of the Journal will shortly be ready 
for distribution and may be procured upon 
application to the Business Manager. Price 
to unions affiliated with the International 
Seamen's Union of America, or members 
thereof, $2. 



The Citizens' Alliance would "free" the 
worker from the necessity of carrying a bona- 
fide union card by blacklisting every man 
and woman who refuses to carry its bogus 
"union" card. 



By refusing to work with the non-unionist 
the trade-unionist invades no right of the 
former; he simply protests against a wrong 
that threatens the very life of trade-union- 
ism. 



Do your personal share toward enforcing 
the Exclusion laws by excluding all Chinese- 
made products from your home! 



French Capital in Russia. 



According to the Bulletin de Statistique de 
Legislation Comparee (Bulletin of the Statis- 
tics of Comparative Legislation), published in 
Paris, France, Russia has received large sums 
of French capital, viz, $1,175,370,000 in Im- 
perial loans and $152,856,000 in industrial 
enterprises. Of these latter Southern Russia 
obtained $58,479,000; Moscow and environs, 
$42,706,000; Russian Poland, $34,740,00; 
St. Petersburg and vicinity, $4,825,000; 
other parts, $8,685,000. France has $9,457,- 
000 in commercial undertakings, $3,474,000 
in banks, and $3,281,000 in real estate trans- 
actions. Thus the total amount invested is 
$1,344,438,000. When it is remembered that 
a very large part of the capital usually ac- 
credited to Belgium in the books of Russian 
and European writers belongs to France, it 
will be seen that the total investments of the 
Republic in the Empire exceed the figures 
furnished in this estimate. 



Convention Call. 



September 15, 1904. 
American Federation of Labor Headquar- 
ters, 423-425 G Street N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. : 
To all Affiliated Unions, Greeting: Pur- 
suant to the Constitution of the American 
Federation of Labor, you are hereby advised 
that the Twenty-fourth Annual Convention 
of the American Federation of Labor will 
be held at Lyric Hall, Eddy Street, in the 
City of San Francisco, California, begin- 
ning at 10 o'clock Monday morning, Novem- 
ber 14, 1904, and will continue in session 
from day to day until the business of the 
convention has been completed. 

REPRESENTATION. 

Representation in the convention will be 
on the following basis: From National or 
International Unions, for less than four 
thousand members, one delegate; four thous- 
and or more, two delegates; eight thousand 
or more, three delegates; sixteen thousand 
or more, four delegates ; thirty-two thousand 
or more, five delegates; sixty-four thousand 
or more, six delegates ; one hundred and 
twenty-eight thousand or more, seven dele- 
gates, and so on ; and from Central Bodies 
and State Federations, and from local trade- 
unions not having a National or Interna- 
tional Union, and from Federal Labor 
Unions, one delegate. 

Organizations, to be entitled to representa- 
tion, must have obtained a certificate of affili- 
ation (charter) at least one month prior to 
the convention ; and no person will be recog- 
nized as a delegate who is not a member in 
good standing of the organization he is 
elected to represent. 

Only bona fide wage-workers, who are not 
members of, or eligible to membership in, 
other trade-unions, are eligible as delegates 
from Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks previous to the convention, and their 
names forwarded to the Secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor immediately 
after their election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
convention unless the tax of their organiza- 
tion has been paid in full to September 30, 
1904. 

The importance of our organizations and 
our movement, the duty of the hour and for 
the future, demand that every organization 
entitled to representation shall send its full 
quota of delegates to the San Francisco con- 
vention, November 14, 1904. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you 
in selecting your delegates. Be fully repre- 
sented. 

Be ably represented by your best, most 
faithful and experienced members. 

CREDENTIALS. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original creden- 
tials must be given to the delegate-elect and 
the duplicates forwarded to the American 
Federation of Labor office, 423-425 G Street, 
Northwest, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet 
at the headquarters of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor ten days previous to the open- 



ing of the convention, and will report imme- 
diately upon the opening thereof at San 
Francisco; hence, secretaries will observe 
the necessity of mailing the duplicate cre- 
dentials of their respective delegates at the 
earliest possible moment to Washington, 
D. C. 

GRIEVANCES. 

Under the law, organizations having griev- 
ances against other organizations are re- 
quired to meet by representation for the pur- 
pose of adjusting the questions in dispute 
before the same can be considered by the 
convention. A grievance which has already 
been considered by a previous convention can 
not be taken up by the forthcoming conven- 
tion unless three years have elapsed from the 
time of the decision being rendered; pro- 
vided, however, that the organization feeling 
aggrieved has obtained the consent of the 
Executive Council to again bring the sub- 
ject-matter to the attention of the convention. 

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Arrangements for hotel accommodations 
have been made as follows : Grand Hotel, 
European plan, $3 and upwards. Russ 
House, American plan, $2 to $3 ; European 
plan, $1 to $2. Lick House, European plan, 
$1 to $2.50. Auditorium, $3.50 to $10 per 
week, European plan. 

Headquarters for the Executive Commit- 
tee will be at the Grand Hotel. Delegates 
should notify Secretary of the Arrangements 
Committee, John Kean, 44 East Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., stating time of their con- 
templated arrival and over which road they 
will travel. 

The Santa Fe Railroad is not patronized 
by organized labor. 

Fraternally yours, 

Attest: Samuel Gompers, President; 
Frank Morrison, Secretary; James Duncan, 
First Vice-President; John Mitchell, Sec- 
ond Vice-President ; James O'Connell, Third 
Vice-President; Max Morris, Fourth Vice- 
President; Thos. I. Kidd, Fifth Vice-Presi- 
dent; D. A. Hayes, Sixth Vice-President; 
Daniel J. Keefe, Seventh Vice-President; 
William J. Spencer, Eight Vice-President; 
John B. Lennon, Treasurer, Executive Coun- 
cil American Federation of Labor. 



Wages in Germany. 

Under date of July 9, 1904, United States 
Consul-General Guenther, of Frankfort, Ger- 
many, transmits the following tabulated state- 
ment taken from the Frankfurter Zeitung of 
July 7, showing the average annual wages 
earned by workmen over sixteen years of age, 
in the mining and iron and steel industries of 
Upper Silesia, Germany, for the five years, 
1S99-1903: 



Industry. 

Mining : 

Coal 

Iron ore 

Zinc and lead ore 

Steel and iron Industry : 

Furnaces 

Rolling mills 

Iron foundries 

Wire, ropes, nails, etc 

Zinc, lead and silver works.. 

Coke ovens 



1899 



8218.33 
146.43 
178.59 

221. f>7 
219. 52 
2M.62 

206.91 
215.72 
197.14 



1900 



$242.38 
155.48 
193.57 

234.76 
121.43 
205.48 
221.67 
234.26 
216.48 



1901 



1902 



3245.24 $231.41 
173.81 179.05 
207.14 226.19 



251.48 

216.19 
211.29 
217.38 
235.24 
235.21 



235.95 
216.19 
210.00 
223.57 
232.14 
223.09 



1903 



8235.71 



192.86 

244.29 
218.57 
211.67 
220.48 
234.05 
221.45 



In celebration of the centenary of Servia's 
liberation from Turkish rule the Servian 
Government is about to issue a special series 
of postage stamps. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




U„„„„ r , T , r , t , rv ,, vrT ,,t,ft*fff*rTrrT*ryn^TfmT«rTmf>rTT>y«trr>i 



Best Governed City. 



Bishop Graves, Missionary Bishop of the 
Episcopal Church in China, headquarters at 
Shanghai, in a recent interview, said: 

"I live in the English concession of Shang- 
hai, and this settlement is probably the best 
governed jcity in the world. It covers about 
nine square miles of ground, and has a pop- 
ulation of nearly 400,000, of which 8,000 
are foreign, chiefly English; next come the 
Americans and some Germans. The French 
concession at Shanghai is small, as it does 
not count for much commercially or other- 
wise. 

"This English settlement has been for 
sixty years next door to the Chinese city. 
Go into the Chinese city ; everything is about 
as it was sixty years ago, except that water 
has been introduced. This concession is gov- 
erned not by the Chinese Government, but 
by ourselves, through a Municipal Council, 
Ihe members, whom we choose, serving with- 
out pay. This Council fixes the rates and 
taxes of the municipality. Wealthy Chinese 
from all over the Empire have come out there 
to live and invest their money at a low rate of 
interest, knowing it will be perfectly safe. 
They go into trade, knowing that they will 
not be squeezed as they would be by Chi- 
nese authorities. These Chinese are progres- 
sive. They have five daily papers, and these 
papers have great independence in the discus- 
sion of all questions. As long as they keep 
clear of revolutionary and anarchistic senti- 
ments the Chinese Government can not in- 
terfere with them. These papers circulate 
widely and have great influence. 

"The Council has charge of the roadways, 
bridges and policing of this European city. 
There is no municipal corruption. Our rep- 
resentatives serve without pay. Our Shang- 
hai is more like a Western city than any 
place in China. We have gas, electric light- 
ing and all modern conveniences, except 
tramways. The ratepayers have objected 
to tramways, but we are soon to have one. 
The travel of the place is now by carriage 
and jinrikshas. 

"The police look out for everything. The 
force is admirable. The sergeants are Eng- 
lish, then come the Sikhs, big fellows, six- 
footers ; then the Chinese. Most of the mem- 
bers of the Municipal Council are English. 
There are one or two Germans and one or 
two Americans. This is the progressive part 
of Shanghai, and a great influence is going 
out from it. 

"There are really no classes in China, as 
we know classes in Europe. One member of 
a family may hold high Government posi- 
tion, while the remainder of the family may 
be peasants, tilling the lands, or engaged in 
the most menial occupations. 

"There has come into China a great de- 
sire for English education. This desire has 
grown rapidly in the last three years. Every- 
where the Chinese are learning English. 
They are starting schools for instruction in 
that language. Wealthy men are getting 



teachers for the private instruction of their 
sons. Young Chinese who have learned Eng- 
lish are in demand as teachers. This de- 
mand is mostly in the provinces along the 
Yangtse Kiang River. It is a very notable 
movement. The Japanese influence in China 
is increasing. Some Chinese are employing 
Japanese teachers and getting through that 
medium the Western knowledge that they 
now deem so desirable. We who have lived 
in China think the Chinese have a better 
basis of character, commercially and other- 
wise, than the Japanese. The Chinese are 
more like Anglo-Saxons and the Japanese 
more like French. The Chinese are conserv- 
ative. They will go ahead when they get 
well started, not as the Japanese, but more 
solidly, more conservatively. 

"As to honesty, the small Chinese trades- 
man, like the Japanese, will cheat ; but in 
large btisiness dealings the Chinese, differ- 
ently from the Japanese, may he depended on 
to carry out his contract, even though he may 
lose money. Few Chinese from Shanghai 
come to the United States. I do not believe 
there are half a dozen in this country. Here 
they are mostly Cantonese. The Chinese who 
have been abroad are more apt to want 
changes in some of the institutions of China. 
For this reason, perhaps, Canton is the head 
center of revolutionary movements. 

"The educated Chinese are growing in pa- 
triotism. The hope of their country is, they 
believe, Western education. 

"In our college at Shanghai — St. John's — 
we have 250 boys. Two-thirds of these, as 
they go out, will go into teaching work. The 
college started in 1878, with sixty pupils. 
With our new building next year we will 
have 300. We have sent out more than 3,000 
boys, and they are all pure Chinese, no Eu- 
rasians, no Japanese. They have learned to 
speak English well, if anything too well, for 
it is book English. They have a seven years' 
course, four of which is preparatory. Their 
Chinese course runs along with their Eng- 
lish. All the higher instruction — chemistry, 
botany, algebra, geometry, political economy, 
history — is taught in English. We have 
boys from almost every province in China. 
Some are there from Honolulu. The edu- 
cative influence of these young men when 
they return to their homes must necessarily 
be great." — Indianapolis News. 



Gulls Cross Pacific. 



A new Swiss watch contains a tiny hard 
rubber phonograph plate, which calls out the 
hours loud enough to be heard twenty feet 
away. Sentiment can be added by having 
the words recorded on the plate in the tones 
of a dear friend, as those of a man's wife or 
children. 



A scientific authority says the popular im- 
pression that the stings of the tarantula and 
the American centipede are poisonous is er- 
roneus. The bite of the tropical centipede is 
dangerous, but the wound inflicted by the 
tarantula is no worse than a wasp's sting. 



To sailors it does not seem very marvelous 
that birds are able to fly from America to 
Asia and back again. But, if one pause to 
consider it, the feat is really something after 
all. 

Seagulls are especially fond of army trans- 
ports, for these ships carry many men who, 
denied the taste for books which renders an 
ocean journey less tedious, and having limited 
facilities for deck sport, take to feeding the 
gulls as a pastime. When one of the big ves- 
sels leaves the Golden Gate and passes the 
Farallone Islands, a hundred or more brown 
bodies with long sweeping wings leave their 
resting place and start in the wake of the 
1 ransport. 

Then some soldier who has made the trip 
before says: "Here come- the seagulls. We'd 
better feed them if we want a quick passage 
this trip." Many soldiers invade the stew- 
ard's premises and gather up the waste bread 
and victuals. 

The birds seem to know when they are to 
be fed, for they come flying in ever-narrowing 
circles until they are within a short distance 
of the ship. Then the food begins to fall 
mi the waters and the brown -winged forms 
swoop eagerly down up in the waves and seize 
what has been thrown out. This is continued 
until the food is exhausted. 

The gulls never seem to rest. Day after 
day they follow the ship, cleaving the air 
with swift wings, flying easily and without 
apparent effort. 

On a recent trip of the transport Logan 
one of the gulls had its wing muscles in- 
jured and dropped fluttering upon the deck, 
its wide, gooselike bill open and strange 
squawks coming from its throat. A soldier 
spied it and took it to his bunk, where he 
fed it daily until it became strong again. 
Then he allowed it to fly away. 

But the bird had not forgotten his bene- 
factor. Every day it would alight on the 
deck and allow none save this particular man 
to feed it. It followed the boat to Honolulu, 
to Guam, and finally to Manila. 

Where it rested during the two weeks the 
Logan lay in Manila is not known, but when 
the vessel turned on her homeward course, 
bound for Nagasaki, the first day out this 
gull, easily distinguishable by a fleck of white 
on its neck, rested on the stern. 

As its favorite soldier did not appear, the 
gull graciously allowed others to feed it, and 
continued his trip with the ship until the 
Logan passed the Farallone Islands. 

A peculiar incident occurred on the steam- 
er Athenian on a trip from Yokohama to 
Vancouver. Five days out, 1,000 miles from 
land in any direction, a little owlet lighted 
on the deck and was captured by the second 
steward. It was a baby owl, a little bundle 
of brown and white feathers, and it blinked 
its ( yes in the daylight as it rested content- 
edly in the cage which the steward provided. 
— New York Herald. 



Six former slaves of Richard Bullock Sea- 
well served as pallbearers at his funeral at 
Raleigh, N. C. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A Bit of Labor History. 

(Continued from page 2.) 



Assembly for February 4, 1903. Prior to that date it 
appeared to your Committee that an effort to kill the 
amendment would, if successful, seriously endanger 
the passage of the bill itself. As the Committee was 
convinced, upon the most competent advice, that the 
amendment was harmless, and that the bill, either 
with or without the amendment, would prove of value, 
if only as a means of securing a test of the courts 
upon its merits, Delegates Wisler and Macarthur 
decided that if need be, in order to save the bill itself, 
they would announce, on behalf of the Labor Council, 
their willingness to accept the bill as amended by the 
Judiciary Committee. This announcement was later 
made to Assemblyman Grove L. Johnson, and by that 
gentleman stated to the Assembly. In making this 
announcement, Delegates Wisler and Macarthur ex- 
pressed, not their approval of the amendment, but 
merely their acceptance of it as the alternative of 
losing the whole bill. 

When the amendment came to a vote, on February 
4, 1903, Assemblyman Copus, of the Union Labor 
party, moved to strike out the words, "or intimida- 
tion." This motion was carried by a vote of 38 to 25, 
as follows : 

Ayes — Allen, Bangs, Barber, Boisson, Copus, Co- 
vert, Dorsey, Dougherty, Duffey, Dunbar, Dunlap, 
Ells, Finn, Greer, John, Kerrigan, Killingsworth, 
King, Lumley, Mahany, Mattos, McConnell, Mc- 
Mahon, McMartin, Moore, Murphy, Pann, Prescott, 
Rolley, Siskron, Snyder, Stanton, "Susman, Walsh, 
Waste, Weger, Wright, Fisk— 38. 

Noes — Amerige, Barnes, Black, Brown, Burgess, 
Camp, Cromwell, Drew, Foster, Goodrich, Higgins, 
Howard, Houser, Johnson, Kelso, King, Lewis of 
Riverside, McKenncy, McNeil, Mott, Olmsted, Pyle, 
Soward, Traber, Walker— 25. 

The bill is now on third reading file in both houses. 
Your Committee recommends that it be the sense of 
the San Francisco Labor Council that the bill should 
be passed as it now stands on the Assembly file. 
Respectfully, 

W. MACARTHUR, 
JAMES BOWLAN, 
J. K. JONES. 
J. W. MAYDER, 
R. I. WISLER. 

San Francisco, Cal., February 6, 1903. 

This report was fully discussed. Assemblyman 
Murphy, of the Union Labor party, was present and 
explained the position of himself and colleagues. The 
result, as published in the Labor Clarion, official 
journal of the San Francisco Labor Council, under 
date of February 13, 1903, is thus recorded: 

"Your Committee recommends that it be the sense 
of the San Francisco Labor Council that the bill 
should be passed as it now stands on the Assembly 
file." 

The foregoing is the recommendation contained in 
the report on the Anti-Injunction bill of the Law and 
Legislative Committee of the Labor Council, sub- 
mitted at the regular meeting last Friday evening. 

This recommendation was adopted, together with 
an amendment declaring that "the Labor Council 
hereby indorses the actions of W. Macarthur and R. 
I. Wisler, its representatives, in relation to the Anti- 
Injunction bill." 

The vote on the recommendation of the Committee 
and the amendment indorsing the actions of Mac- 
arthur and Wisler was 85 ayes, 9 noes. 

This vote was taken after a lone; discussion on the 
history of the Anti-Injunction bill and the incidents 
which prompted the Council's specific indorsement of 
the actions of Macarthur and Wisler in this matter. 

Simultaneously with the effort to turn the Labor 
Council against its representatives, a similar move 
was made in the convention of the State Federation 
of Labor, which met in Los Angeles during the first 
week in January, 1903. No official records of the lat- 
ter episode are obtainable, for the reason, presuma- 
bly, that the matter was sprung upon the convention 
out of order. It is sufficient to say, in refutation of 
the assertions that the convention "scored" the repre- 
sentatives of the Labor Council, that when the latter 
had explained the situation, precisely as it is ex- 
plained in the foregoing, not a single voice of dissent 
was raised: even the delegates who were responsible 
for the introduction of the subject were forced into 
silence. The State Federation, like the San Fran- 
cisco Labor Council, was unanimous, or practically 
so. in upholding the common-s<mse, businesslike meth- 
ods adopted to secure labor legislation, irrespective 
of all questions of politics or of personal or party 
reputation. 

A brief summary of the final action on the Anti- 
Injunction bill will suffice for present purposes. The 
words, "or intimidation" were stricken from the 
amendment. Afterward ihe bill was recommitted and 
the amendment ehansred to read- "Provided, that 
nothing in this Act shall be eon=trued to authorize 
ihe use of force, violence or threats thereof." Tn this 
form the bill was finally passed during the closing 
hours of the session. That the intention of the 
Union Labor Assemblymen, in moving to strike out 
the words, "or intimidation," were good is beyond 



A central office for the supplying of infor- 
mation about all the possible trips by trolley 
in the vicinity of Boston has been opened in 
that city by a man who also undertakes per- 
sonally to conduct parties around the coun- 
try near Boston. These trips cover from one 
to three days and take in all the interesting 
points within easy reach. The traveling is 
clone exclusively by trolley. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America) 

121 and 133 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone 1321 Monroe. 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS 



RELIEF STATIONS 



Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven. Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, WSs 
Toledo, O. 



question, as has been recognized and conceded by all. 
That theii judgment in opposing the course suggested 
by the men directly intrusted with the care of the 
bill was seriously at fault, is equally well known, 
since their action in that respect would have defeated 
the bill but for the assistance rendered at the last 
moment by other members. That the action of the 
Union Labor Assemblymen in attacking the repre- 
sentatives of organized labor was bad political tactics, 
not to say bad morals, was also quite clear to every 
one outside the Union Labor party organization. 
However, the latter phase of the subject may be 
explained, if not excused, upon the ground of ignor- 
ance, both as concerns the men attacked and as con- 
cerns the body which they represented. The whole 
incident was regrettable in many ways; but in one 
sense it resulted in good, since it called forth the 
emphatic declaration that no political party, regard- 
less of the colors under which it sails, need lay claim 
to control of the labor movement. 

Having thus presented the case in all its essential 
details, the incident of the charges against Wisler 
and Macarthur is closed, so far as this paper is con- 
cerned. That incident would not have been opened 
in these columns had the question of personal char- 
acter or feeling been the only question involved. As 
stated at the outset of these remarks, the real ques- 
tion involved in the attacks upon Wisler and Mac- 
arthur is much larger than any question of individual 
good name; it is, in brief, the question of the right 
of a labor organization to carry on its legislative work 
in its own way and to demand that its representatives 
shall be accorded a respectful hearing from legis- 
lators and other public servants. The San Francisco 
Labor Council has very thoroughly asserted that 
right. It is a right that the labor movement gener- 
ally must assert if labor legislation is to become a 
practical reality instead of merely a promise of the 
politician. 



We Don't Patronize. 



BRANCHES 
SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL.... 138 Ninety-second Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South 

BUFFALO, N. Y 73 Main Street 

Telephone 1465 Seneca 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Cuyahoga C 2130 

TOLEDO, 60G Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y. 152 Main Street 

AGENCIES 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge St. East 

Telephone Zenith 1373 
BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

SUB-AGENCIES 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SANDUSKY, 639 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS 
CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH. CLEVELAND, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis. Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs, 
Wertheim & Schiffer, of New York City; The 
Henry George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby, Milling Company, Min- 
neapolis, Minn.; Kelley Milling Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Pipes — Win. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tohaeeo — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y.; Straw- 
bridge & Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner 
Bros., New York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Com- 
pany, Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, 
N. Y. ; Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James 
R. Kaiser, New York City. 

Shoes — Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; 
Thomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass.; Harney 
Bros., Lynn, Mass. 

Suspenders — Russell Mfg. Company, Middletown, 
Conn. 

Textile — Merrimac Manufacturing Company (print- 
ed goods), Lowell, Mass. 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica, N. Y. 

Woolens — Hartford Carpet Company, Thompson- 
ville, Conn.; J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Company, Chicago, 111. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Company, publishers, 
Hammond, Ind.; Gazette, Terra Haute, Ind.; 
Times, Los Angeles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS AND STONE. 
Pottery and Brick — J. B. Owens Pottery Company, 
of Zanesville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta 
Company, of Chicago, 111.; Terra Haute Brick and 
Pipe Company, of Terra Haute, Ind.; Evans & 
Howard Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick Company, St. 
Louis, Mo.; C. W. Stine Pottery Company, White 
Cottage, Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Com- 
pany, Pittsburg, Pa. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury 
Mass.; Carr, Preseott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Davis Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, Dayton, Ohio: Computing Scale 
Company, Dayton, Ohio; Iver Johnson Arms Com- 
pany, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Company, 
Syracuse, N. Y. ; Brown & Sharpe Tool Company, 
Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Company, 
Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas TaeK Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass.; Hohmann & Maurer Manufacturing 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. ; Henry Disston & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Ni- 
agara Falls, N. Y. ; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont. ; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, 
Ohio; Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H.; 
American Circular Loom Company, New Orange, 
N. J.; Payne Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lin- 
coln Iron Works, Rutland, Vt. ; F. R. Patch Manu- 
facturing Company, Rutland, Vt. ; Art Metal Con- 
struction Company, Jamestown, N. Y. ; Erie City 
Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David Maydole Hammer 
Company, Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Meskir, Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Brie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stove, Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa. 

STREET RAILWAYS. 
Terre Haute — Street Railway Company. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, 
Circleville, Ohio. 

Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cooperage — Cincinnati Cooperage Company, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; Northwestern Cooperage and Lum- 
ber Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye 
Stave Company), of Ohio\ Michigan and Wiscon- 
sin; Elgin Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Wil- 
liams Cooperage Company and Palmer Manufac- 
turing Company, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; Ballard & 
Ballard Milling Company, Louisville, Ky. 

China — Wick China Company, Kittanning, Pa. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, 
Ga.; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Druck- 
er & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table 
Company, St. Johns, Mich. 

Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York. N. Y.; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, 
Cape May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Henry Ayres, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, 
Md.; Huttig Sash and Door Company, St. Louis, 
Mo.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg, Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co.; Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus 
Buggy and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; 
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; 
Diamond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Pens — L. E. Waterman & Co.. New York City. 

Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co., Batavia, N. Y.; 
J. N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 

Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Company, Nor- 
folk, N. Y. 
Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phil- 
adelphia, Pa.; Crescent. Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany: Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 



10 



(OAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



The Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen re- 
port good progress in their line of business. 
All the agencies arc doing weU financially 
and joining new members right along. Seven 
Shipwreck Benefits were paid to as many 
members, who were wrecked in the City of 
Rockland, one of the Eastern Steamship ( Iran- 
pany's vessels. The Norwegian fruit steam 
ei's trading to Mobile and New Orleans have 
generally given np the practice of sending to 
Norway for their crews. Long experience 
.night them thai the '"home boys" won'1 
stay long enough on board even to reimburse 
the owners for their passage-money, much 
less allow them to profit from the small wane 
rate at which they were shipped. And so 

the fruit steamers, almost without exception, 

employ union seamen at union wages. 



Fag Ends. 



Necessity set- the pace that quickens the 
march of Progress. 



To the petty-minded the Large questions of 
life are the hobbies of cranks. 



The "strenuous life" and the "simple life'' 
should alternate. Too much of anything is 



good for nothing. 



A perusal of Andrew Furuseth's Labor 
Day address makes it plain that a man's righl 
to labor is equal to his right to live. 



Field S. Pendleton's threats against the 
Seamen's Union have all the force of strong 
words uttered on an empty stomach. 



Friendships between men arc an outcome of 
the law that "like seeks like." Hence, the 
more normal you are the more friends you 
will have. Great minds are compensated for 
their loneliness in this respect by the admira- 
tion of the multitude. 



A republic whose citizens are educated by 
example and precept to regard unskilled 
manual labor as low and undignified, is 
doomed to imperialism. Free institutions 
can not long endure where an aristocracy of 
wealth and monopoly is a reality and the 
"dignity of labor" a mere abstraction. 

Honesty is far more than "the best policy;" 
il is the keystone of the whole social fabric. 
It is impossible to conceive of a civilized 
society not founded upon common honesty 
between man and man. This is so because 
honesty is the outward manifestation of that. 
sincerity of character without which no man 
i- i ruly civilized. 



These are the days when the campaign 
spellbinders gush and become enthusiastic 
over organized labor. After the election or- 
ganized labor will have to do its own gush- 
ing, for then there will he none so poor to 
do it honor. When will workingmen get 
wise and control the politicians by means of 
the Initiative ami Referendum 1 



1 ton't knock the Union for the misdei 
individual members. It isn't fair to the ma- 
jority, and shows a lack of discrimination 



and impartiality, which unfits a man for sit- 
ting in judgment upon other-. Besides, it is 
ever so much easier to \r:iv ('own than to 
build up. Unwise knocking of the Union 
will sometimes undo the labor of years by the 
membership, (/ease your knocking, there- 
fore, and take your turn at helping to get 
things in shipshape order again ! 

Our laws, customs and institutions reflect 
the trend of our minds because they are all 
creatures of mind, the composite mind of a 
race. No mind can conceive heyond its capac- 
ity. If. our laws, customs and institutions 
are crude, irrational and imjKTfect it is be- 
cause our minds are not yet sufficiently de- 
veloped to beget better results. The law of 
evolution works slowly and takes in. cog- 
nizance of individuals. Therefore, the ideas 
and conceptions of advanced thinkers will 

lie fallow until the composite mind of man- 
kind has grown and caught up with them. 
Then they will he materialized — and con- 
demned as crude by the advanced minds of 
that generation. 

It is true that it is not, and should not he. 
the province of the Government to provide 
work for the citizens. Bui neither is it, nor 
should it be, the province of the Government 
to deprive the great majority of the citizens 
of their rightful opportunities to labor for 
themselves, by granting to a few favored ones 
special privileges in the shape of 1 lopolies 

of natural resources. Since it does grant 
these privileges, the Government can not well 
absolve itself from the duty of in some way 
providing for the necessities of those whom 
its policy of favoritism has debarred from 
that free and equal access to the Common- 
wealth's natural resources which is the in- 
herent and inalienable rigl;t of every .me of 
it> citizens. The Government, of all human 
institutions, should be the most impartial in 
its dealings with the people; but the noto- 
rious fact is that it exists mainly for the pro- 
tection of vested interests reared upon a 
foundation of monopolies and special privi- 
leges. 



Immigration in Panama. 

The Republic of Panama recently passed 
an Act on general immigration, which be- 
came law on July 12, providing that all for- 
eigners over eighteen years of age who come 
to the Isthmus with the purpose of remaining 
in the country shall pay a tax in the current 

n ey of the Republic at the date of their 

< ling, as follows: First-class passengers, 

$ I ; second-class passengers, $2. The Act 
provides that the owner or agent of any 
steamer or vessel in which the passenger ar- 
rives shall pay the tax within twenty-four 
hours after the passenger is landed. In case 
of failure or refusal to pay said tax said 
owner or agent shall pay a fine of $4 for each 
passenger so landed. The Act also prohibits 
the landing of lunatics, dangerous maniacs, 
idiots, professional beggars, anarchists, crim- 
inals, individuals of bad conduct, tuberculous 
persons, lepers, epileptics, and all who have 
a contagious or repugnant disease. The phy- 
sician of the port is charged with enforcing 
this part of the law, and anyone who evades 
the law clandestinely is subject to a fine of 
not less than $^00 nor more than $800. 



International Seamen's Union ot America. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. II. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, MASS., I%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BANGOR, ME., 44 Union St. 
PORTLAND. ME., 377A Fore St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I., 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 37 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. V., 68 West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Southeast corner Second 
and Lorn baid Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD.. 604 East Pratt St. 

NORFOLK, VA., 52 Campbells Wharf. 

NEW BEDFORD. MASS.. 7 South Water St. 

MOBILE, ALA.. 104 Commerce St. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.. 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 

GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 
Branches: 

NEW YORK CITY, 51-52 South St. 
BOSTON. MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD.. 1800 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA., corner Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE. ALA., 101 South Commerce St. 
GALVESTON. TEC 20 Strand St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARD'S ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., 2"23 Commercial St. 
Branch: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 21 Old Slip. 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branches: 
GLOUCESTER, MASS.. 141% Main St. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 129 Twenty-third St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

CHICAGO, ILL., 121-123 North Desplainea St. 
Branches: 

MILWAUKEE, W r IS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO. N. Y.. 73 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO, O., 606 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St. 
DETROIT, MICH., 7 Woodbrige St., East. 
SUPERIOR. WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND. WIS., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, MICH., 919 North Water St. 
RACINE. WIS.. 923 Forest St. 
MANITOWOC, WIS., 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE, PA., 107 Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL., 138 Ninety-second St. 
SANDUSKY. O., 639 Water St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 

CHEAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 65 Main St. 
Branches: 

DETROIT, MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y„ 164 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y.. 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA. WASH., 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE. WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH., 88% Qulncy St 
ABERDEEN, WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. OR.. 23 North Front St. 
EUREKA, CAL.. P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. I„ P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Branch : 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH, Colman Dock, Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 9 Mission St. 

Branch i 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 42. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL., 200 M St. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION 

Headquarters, Astoria, Or. 

II. M. I. OH mm: V Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room is open at all times to Members 

of the Sailors' Union. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 

Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mis- 
sion. 

American Printing- House, 1067 Market. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, James H., The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Benson & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., 321 Cali- 
fornia. 

Brunt, W. N., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 

California Printing Co., 41-43 Eighth. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Commercial Publishing Co., S. E. cor. 
First and Mission. 

Cook, The Morton L., Second and Minna. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton. 538 Sacramento 1 . 

Dettmar, C. H., 529 California. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 

Fording & Payne, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 103-109 Union 
Square. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 1019 
Market. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden West Press, 527 Mission. 

Gould, W. H., 1019 Market. 

Hancock Bros., 73 Third. 

Harvey, John D., 246 Sutter. 

Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hiester, Wm. A., City Hall Square. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hinton Printing Co., 516 Commercial. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 

Jalumstein Printing Co.. 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lacaze, L., 519 California. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Leldecker, C. Co., 156 New Montgomery. 

Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Meyerfeld, Albert M., 414 Pine. 

Meyer Printing Co., 638 Mission. 

Mission Free Press, The, 2401 Mission. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Munk, R., 809 Mission. 

Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Pacific Heights Printery, 2438 Sacra- 
mento. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M., 1010 Buchanan. 

Phillips, Smyth & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 723 Montgomery. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-325 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411 y 2 California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Shanley, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Spaulding, Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co., 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 

Sterett, W. I. Co., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 213 Stevenson. 

Steutzel & Co., 109 California. 

Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square Ave. 

Town Talk Printing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Upton Bros., 17 Fremont. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wahl & Drake, 850 Market. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Bookbinders. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power, 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Kitchen, John Jr. Co., 510-514 Commer- 
cial. 

Levison Printing Co.. 514 Sacramento. 

McGeeney, Wm. H, 33 Stevenson. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 
Lithographers and Printers. 

Britton & Rey, 525 Commercial. 

Galloway Lithographing Co., 410 San- 
some. 

Roesch Co., Louis, 321-325 Sansome. 
Photo-Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Mont- 
gomery, near Mission. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Mission. 

Lewis & Newberry Co., 645 Market. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant Ave. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 
Ave 

Union Engraving Co.. 144 Union Square 

Yoseniite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotype™ and Stereotype™. 

American Press Association, 207 Sacra- 
mento. . , , 
Hoftschneider Bros., 412 Commercial. 
Martin & Co., 608 Clay. 



Good Shoes for Men 



A Surprising Collection 
of Fall Styles. 

Surprising number of styles — all the very 

latest lasts. 
Surprising values. 
The " Rightway " buying plan gets the best 

for the money. 
Surprising ability to give you a perfect fit. 
Every fitter is an expert. 
If you are not a Rightway customer, many 

surprises await you. 
Better values at all the popular prices — that's 

.the rule with us. 




Phelan Building, 812-814 Market Street, San Francisco. 
Mail Orders Given Special Attention. 



i***&*g* 




El a week $1 

Gold Watch or Diamond I 

9 

UINITBD STATESf 

WATCH CLUB! 

640 MARKET ST., ROOM 3| 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager. p 



Be Sii Go-Operative Tailors 



English Worsted Suit $15.00 
English Tweed Suit . 15.00 
Scotch Tweed Suit . 13.50 



XXXX Beaver Suit . $22.50 
French Pequet C. & V. 15.00 
English Serge . . . 14.00 



PANTS TO ORDER, $4.00 



3000 Patterns to 
Select From 

By co-operating together we are enabled to make you a suit of any ma- 
terial known, on a profit of $2.50, be it XXXX Beaver or French Cassimere. 
Not a trust — but eo-operation. 

Dependable Work. You Select the Clotb. 

Perfect Fit. We Do the "Work. 

CAN YOU TOUCH THE ABOVE PRICES ELSEWHERE? 



THE SIX CO-OPERATIVE TAILORS, 

We are far down Market Street. 
Reason: Kent, $1.1 »er month. 



31 Market Street 

WE ARE OUR OWN 
BOSSES. 



Union Boot & Shoe Store 



United Working men 
Co-Operative Company's 



m 



8hoes Constantly on Hand 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

C. LESTER, 12 Steuart St. 



The Castle Cigar Store 

250 East Street, near Folsom, 
KEEPS THE 
BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS AND TO- 
BACCOS. 

Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
G. H. PALMER, Proprietor. 



World's WorKers. 



Although there has been a cessation of 
the general strike in Italy, there is still 
on a strike of 2,325 engine-drivers and 
stokers against their chief engineer. 

It is reported that another strike is 
probable among the cutters and polish- 
ers of Antwerp and Amsterdam over the 
apprentice question. The men only re- 
cently returned to their work after a 
long strike. 

At a meeting of the Social Democratic- 
Congress held at Bremen, Germany, re- 
cently, resolutions were adopted pledg- 
ing the support of the German Socialists 
to Russian workingmen, particularly by 
sending them printed matter, and de- 
manding the passage of laws defining the 
rights of foreigners in Germany. 

A Committee of the Left, representing 
Socialist, Republican and Radical mem- 
bers of the Italian Chamber of Deputies, 
presented to the President of that body 
a petition asking that Parliament be 
convoked for the purpose of discussing 
the policy pursued by the Government 
in connection with the general strike. 

Herr Liebknecht, principal counsel for 
the men recently tried at Koenigsburg, 
on charges of treason against Russia, 
declared that the German Government 
and the courts admitted that foreigners 
did not enjoy any legal protection in 
Germany, but were liable to domicilary 
visitations, arbitrary arrest and indefi- 
nite confinement. 

In the 270 British trade-unions with 
an aggregate membership of 568,272 
making returns to the Board of Trade, 
34,494 (or 6.1 per cent) were reported 
as unemployed at the end of July, as 
compared with 5.9 per cent a month ago, 
and 4.9 per cent in July, 1903. The 
mean percentage of unemployed returned 
at the end of July during the ten years 
1894-1903 was 3.8. 

To protest against a conflict between 
strikers and the police, in which two 
strikers, a Sardinian and a Sicilian, were 
killed, the Socialists have decided on a 
general strike throughout Italy, which 
began on September 16 at Milan, and 
threatens to spread through the whole 
peninsula. The Government has taken 
extraordinary measures to suppress the 
strike and has stopped all telegrams re- 
ferring to it. 

A delegation of French workingmen, 
sent at the Government's expense, on 
September 17 sailed for New York on 
its way to St. Louis. The industries 
represented are the manufacture of cot- 
ton, musical instruments, shoes, hats, 
machinery, tools and railway supplies. 
Experts in commercial affairs and in 
mail distribution and the heads of the 
national labor organizations. MM. Bruis 
son and Rousseau accompany the party. 

The changes in rates of British wages 
reported to the Board of Trade during 
July affected nearly 5,300 workpeople, 
of whom over 1,500 received advances, 
and nearly 3,800 sustained decreases. 
The net effect of all the changes was a 
decrease of nearly $650 per week. The 
changes of the previous month affected 
nearly 14,700 workpeople, the net result 
being a decrease of about $800 per week. 
During July, 1903, the number affected 
was over 59,400 workpeople, and the net 
result a decrease of about $9,500 per 
week. 

The New Zealand Arbitration Court 
has fixed the minffhum rate of wages for 
brick, pottery and clay workers in the 
Auckland district as follows: Fireclay 
and ornamental brick and tile and pipe 
workers and flangers, Is 2d per hour; 
junction stickers and molders, Is Id; 
competent burners in any kiln, lO'/ijd; 
all other workers over 21, Is per hour 
when not constantly employed, and £2 5s 
per week where employment is constant. 
Hours, 48 per week, except burners, who 
shall work 12-hour shifts if required 
while burning is going on. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



General News. 

i — — 

The German naval budget for 1905 
contains estimates for the increase of 
the personnel to 40,000 officers and men. 

Louis Fleischmann, the millionaire 
baker and philanthropist, died of par- 
alysis at New York City on September 
26. 

The eruption of Mount Vesuvius con- 
tinues to increase in force, and is now 
more violent than at any time since 
1872. 

The Russian volunteer licet steamers 
Smolensk and St. Petersburg, the former 
with 350 tons of coal and the latter with 
100 tons of coal, have sailed from Port 
Said, ostensibly for Libau. 

It is reported on good authority that 
a shipping conference recently held at 
Frankfort-on-the-Main decided on a $10 
reduction in the steerage rates from 
Hungary to the United States. 

Women singers are finally to be ex- 
eluded from the choirs of the Roman 
Catholic churches of New York and the 
Gregorian chant is to replace the more 
florid music which heretofore has been 
part of the mass. 

The French Government is about to 
install the first French wireless telegraph 
station on the island off the westernmost 
point of France. This will be used to 
communicate with incoming and outgo- 
ing transatlantic steamers. 

With the appointment of the Grand 
Duchess of Mecklenburg-Schwerin as 
Colonel of the King Frederick William 
III Regiment of Grenadier Guards, the 
number of women Colonels in the Prus- 
sian army is rounded out to thirteen. 

Admiral Dewey on September 23 re- 
ceived the congratulations of his fellow- 
officers and friends on the fiftieth -anni- 
versary of his entrance into the naval 
service. President Roosevelt sent a let- 
ter and a handsome bouquet of flowers. 

A fast freight on the P.altimore and 
Ohio Railroad struck a wagon loaded 
with 750 pounds of dynamite at a cross- 
ing at North Branch, near Cumberland. 
\\ . Ya.. on September 23. Two trainmen 
were killed and nine persons were injur- 
ed, three of them seriously. 

A movement has been started to have 
the body of Emile Zola placed in the 
French Pantheon. The movement will 
take more definite form October 2, the 
anniversary of his death, when a demon- 
stration will be made at his tomb in the 
Cemetery of Montmartre. 

Vast sums ot Astor money are going 
into building and operation of the Tu- 
nis Mono-rail Railway, and within a 
year, it is asserted, trains will be run- 
ning between Washington and Baltimore, 
covering the forty miles in twenty-four 
minutes, or at the rate of 100 miles per 
hour. 

Professor Niels Finsen, discoverer of 
the so-called Finsen rays of light for 
the cure of lupus, and head of the Fin- 
sen Ray Institute at Copenhagen. Den- 
mark, died in that city on September 
24. Professor Finsen, in December, 1893, 
was awarded the Nobel medical prize by 
the Norwegian Parliament. 

The following statement of the admis- 
sions at the World's Fair for six days 
ending September 24 was given out on 
the 25th: Monday. September 19, 105,- 
552; Tuesday, September 20, 122.341; 
Wednesday. September 21, 139,022; 
Thursday, September 22, 150,620; Fri- 
day, September 23, 139.176; Saturday, 
September 24, 113,701* total, 770,418. 
Total to date, 11,792,848. 

The White Star liner Celtic, which 
arrived at New York on Septem- 
ber 24 from Liverpool and Queens- 
town, had on board the largest 
number of passengers ever brought to 
the former port on a single vessel. Her 
passenger list consisted of 310 saloon. 
239 second-cabin, and 2,388 third-class 
passengers, a total of 2,937, which, to- 
gether -with her crew of 381, made a 
grand total of 3,318 persons on board. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters are advertised for six months 
and kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not called 
for at the expiration of one year letters 
will be returned to the Postoffice. 



Aagard, A. M. 
Aalto. Arthur 
Abrahamson, E. 
Adreasen, Edvin 
Agerup, Rich. 
Ahlquist. Albert 
Albrecht, Carl 
Alexis, Hakan 
Allan, John 
Amundsen, Martin 
Amundsen, Pet 
Amundson, Alf. 
Andersen-689 
Andersen-912 
Andersen-925 
Andersen, Adolf 



Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Carl Alf 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, H.-403 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersson-139 
Andersson-1082 
Andorsson, A. W. 
Andersson, C. S. 
Andersson, Eskil 
Andersson, John 
Andersson, K. E. W. 
Antonsen, Martin 
Apps, Alf 
Ardelenu. Joan 
Arnesen-1111 



Andersen, Bernhard Arnesen-1146 
Andersen, B. Hj. Arnesen, Ragnyald 



Anderson-58 
Anderson, A. E. 
Baker, John 
Balcom, B. M. 
Barber, A. 
Barrett, Wm. 
Bastion. W. 
Bauer, K. O. 
Bauer, Ludv. 
Baugh, A. E. 
Bechler, Joseph 
Benson. C. 
Berger-1210 
Berlenz, Emil 
Bernard, S. 
Bernert, Fred 
Beyerle. R. 
Blankenfeld, O. 
Blinne, Karl 
Blomberg, Gus 
Blom, Philip 
Cainan, Geo. 
Carlsen, C. W. 
Carlsen, E.-699 
Carlsen, Johan A. 
Carlsen, John L. 
Carlsen, Thomas 
Carlson-449 
Carlsson-5ol 
Carlsson. Axel G. 
Carlsson, W. S. 
Caroe. Arthur 
Casius. Chas. 
Christensen-851 
Chrlstensen-878 
Christensen, Carl 
Dabel, W. G. 
Dahl. John M. 
Dahlberg, Gunnar 
Dahlgren, Albin 
Dahlgren, Karl 
Daniel. J. — (M.) 
Edalf, C. 
Ehrhardt. A. 
Ekhart, W. 
Ekstrom, J. P. 
Ellison, EdN. 
Els, John 
Kmanuelsen, C. 
Enbom, Wm. 
Endresen, Enok 
Engblom, John 
Fabricius, H.-170 
Fahleson, John E. 
Fischer, A.-440 
Flodin, John 
Foster, Frank 
Fox, Thomas 
Gabrielsen, Knud 
Gabrielsen. M. 
Gaedecke, E. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Glaubitz, Fred 
Gohring, Wm. 
Haberman, H. 
Hakansson, G. 
Halvorsen, H. 
Halvorsen, Morten 
Hansen-1162 
Hansen-1218 
Hansen, Alf S. 
Hansen, Andrew 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen, H. Sigur 
Hansen, Johan 
Hansen, John P. 
Hansen, Maurius 



Asmussen, M. C. 

Bock, Chas. 
Bogvist. Chas. 
Bohnhoff, H. 
Bolander-663 
Boiling. O. 
Borini. Lewis 
Bottcher, J. G. C. 
Brandters, J. 
Brandt, Fred 
Braun, F.-1195 
Bredesen, Edwin 
Brillowsky, N. 
Brooman, Henry 
Brose, R. 
Brown, E. 
Buck, Harry 
Bush, W. 
Byerling, C. A. 

Christensen, E. 
Christensen. G. L. 
Christensen, Henrik 
Christensen, J. R. 
Christensen, O. M. 
Clausen-793 
Cleary, Thomas 
Clough, H. R. 
Coadon, Louis 
Connor, John J. 
Connor. Wm. 
Cook, Harry 
Cooper, Hans 
Cuno. J. 
Cutmann, A. R. 
De Haan. G. A. 
Doense, J. 
Dorlis, Harold 
Dorsch, Fred 
Draeger, M. 
Dyck. Max 
Lngstrom, C. 
Enstrom, Gust 
Eriksen-512 
Erikson, E. 
Erikson, Thure 
Eriksson, John 
Ettershank, J. 
Evald, Ernst 
Evensen, A. A. 
Evensen, Einar O. 
Foyn, Sam 
Frandsen, Frands P. 
Freiman, August 
French, J. A. 
Frivold, John T. 

Gray, J. K. 
Grey, E. J. 
Gulbransen, Nils 
Oundersen-515 
Gunlach, John 
Gunther, Th. 
Gustavson, Adolf 
Hedberg, Alf 
Heleneus-1360 
Hell, A.-1012 
Henrikson, Axel 
Hesselberg, Chas. 
Hesselberg, K. 
Hetebrugge, W. 
HU1-U4S 
Hinner, Paul 
Hjeresen, Viggo 
Hobson. Thomas 
Hokansson, Fred 
Hollger, Rich. 



Hansen, Nokhart M.Holmes. Martin 



Hansson-1270 
Hardy, Wm. 
Harned, Will E. 
Hartig, Otto 
Hay, Wm.-1193 
Hazel, W. 
Ild, Julius 
Jacobsen, Emil 
Jakobsen-1341 
Jakobsen. N. C. 
Jankeri, Oskar 
Janssen, Weert 
Jansson-1234 
Jansson, John 
Jens, Otto 
Jensen-769 
Jensen-1461 
Jensen, Gust. 
Jensen, Martin 
Jensen, Rasmus 
Johannesen-1421 
Johannesen-1422 
Johannesen. Anton 
Johansen-1030 
Johansen-1238 
Johansen, B. J. 
Johansen, F. C. 
Johansson-880 
Kaehne, R. 
Kanger, Herman 
Kanzler, Wm. 
Karlsen-270 
Karlsen-3S8 
Karlsen, Ed J. 
Karlsen, John L. 
Karlsen, Thomas 
Karlson-421 
Karlson-551 
Karlson, Karl R. 
Karlsson-503 
Karlsson, G. J. 
Karlsson. O. S. 
Kask. John 
Kennedy, M. J. 
Kerharo, Frank 
Kepmka, R. 
Kihl, Harry 
Landgren, Carl 
Langvardt, N. 
Larkin, Sam 
Larsen-643 
Larsen-916 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen-SOl 
Larsen, C.-824 



Holtti, John 
Horstman, H. 
Hoss, John 
Houston, Rob 
Hultman, Carl 
Hult, Wm. 
I; aksson, G. E. 
Johansson -109 5 
Johansson- 139 6 
Johansson-1544 
Johansson, A. 
Johansson, Aug. 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, Elis 
Johansson, Nils L. 
Johnsen-983 
Johnson-588 
Johnson-1300 
Johnson, Ed. F. E. 
Johnson, W. J. 
Johnson, Win. 
Jonasen, Rasmus 
Jungjohan, J. 
Jonsen, Ingvald 
.Torgensen, Theo. 
Jorgensen, Walde- 

mar 
Jorgensen, Walter 
Kittilsen, Laurits 
Kjar, Niels 
Klausen, Carl J. 
Klausner, Karl 
Knudsen, Fred 
Knutsson. O. H. 
Kokkala, H. 
Kolderup, K. A. 
Korsman, Erik 
Krane, Karl 
Krantz. B. N. 
Krlstensen, H. 
Kristensen, O. M. 
Kristiansen, T. O. 
Kris toff ersen-6 14 
Krogstad, Eugen 
Krohnert. Alb. 
Kunedt, Wm. 

Lepsoe, H. 
Lewin, Chas. 
Lie. Carl-1042 
Lillie, Fred 
Lindquist, C. 
Lind. T. (registered) 
Lindvig, G. 
Lite, Knut 



Larsen, Hans 
Larsen, Julius H. 
Larson, Alb. E. 
Larson, Manne 
Larsson-933 
Larsson, Sigurd 
Laskey, W. 
Lauritsen, Ole 
Lee-608 

Legallais, Jules 
Leineweber, J. 
Madison, David 
Madsen-952 
Madsen, C.-905 
Madsen. Hans M. 
Mahoney, F. E. 
Malmkvist, Carl 
Martelock, Chas. 
Materre, Alex 
Mathiesen, Th. L. 
Mathison, J. M. 
Matiasen, Nils 
Mattejat, W. 
Maunstrom, Wm. 
McCarthy, Peter 
McCombs, F. S. 
McGarrick, John 
McKeating, R. 
McLoughlin. M. 
Meinseth. Albert 
Meland. Edius 
Menthen. Otto 
Neilsen, M. P. 
Nelson-663 
Nichlasen. N. C. 
Nielsen-678 
Nielsen-859 
Nielsen, Berger 
Nielsen, Ole 
Nielsen, W. 
Nielsen. Willie 
Nilsen-501 
Oberg. E. W. 
Oberg, Herbert 
Oberg, J. E. 
Oberhauser, J. 
Oliegrun. John 
Olsen-206 
Olsen-530 
Olsen-542 
Paersson, C. A. 
I 'asson, Bruno 
Peabodv. Frank 
Pedersen-793 
Pedersen, Chr. 
Pedersen, K.-945 
Pederson, Louis 
Pedersen, Ole 
Perry, Ben 
Petersen-659 
Fett-?rsen-903 
Petersen-954 
Rahlf, Jurgen 
Rasrnusen, Alb. 
Rasmussen-525 
Rasmussen. Geo. P. 
Reichman, Zan 
Renlund. Andrew 
Renter, Chas. 
Robb, John A. 
Saart, Aug. 
Salhareasen, Jorgen 
Samsioe, Sven 
Samuelson. Chas. 
Sandav, Frank 
Sandberg-938 
Sandberg. Theodor 
Sander-1068 
Santos, Augustin 
Sausin, Robert 
Schade, Wenzel 
Schaefer, T. 
Scheller, Otto 
Schluter, Johan 
Schmehl, Paul 
Schopper, H. 
Schubert-887 
Schultz-1307 
Schutties, Eugen 
Schwenke, Karl 
Scott, H. C. 
Sehey, J. O. 
Self, Arthur 
Setterberg, K. 
Shubert, Otto 
Sillsots, S. 
Siltberg, Chas. 
Silva. Joe H. 
Tait. Geo. 
Thiele. A. 
Thorn, Arvid 
Thorssen. Fred 
Tillman, Anders 
Tompson, Loui 
Udby, Harold 
Udd, John-885 
Uken, H. 
Vangsoe, J. P. J. 
Vassallo, P. 
Vermaas. G. 
Vick. Chas. 
Vickstrom 
Videberg, Oskar 
Viereck, Heinrich 
Wagner, J. 
w afl, R. A.-744 
Wallstedt-495 
Walter, E. 
Warren, Frank 
Warren, W. A. 
Warta. Arthur 
Weibust, John 
Welden. Ed 
Welsh. John 
Wendelborg, A. 
Westerholm, V. W. 
Westin, John 
Weyer, Carl 
Yerna. Frank 
Zaehrisen. J. M. 
Ziffer, Chas. 



Lockwood. Chas. 
Lofberg, F. Magnus 
Lolraa ii. W erner 
London, Frank 
Lorentzen-990 
Lorenzen. Jorgen 
Luden, Albin 
Ludolph, H. 
Lund, Chas. 
Lyons, Joseph 

Merriam, B. W. 
Mersman, Achiles 
Meyer, T.-9S3 
Mikkelsen, S. 
Miller, Eugene 
lUilos, Petar 
Mjones, Arne 
Morisse, D. 
Morre, B. F. 
Morris, E. C. 
Morris, Wm. T. 
Morstadt, A. T. 
Mortenson, Crist 
Mortensen, M. H. 
Mullen, Leo L. 
Muller, Leo 
Muller, R. 
Mullins, Dan 
Munroe. Harry Geo. 
Munson, Michael 
Murstadt. A. F. 
Nilsen, Nils-737 
Nilsson-731 
Nissen, J. 
Nissen, James 
Norbin, Axel 
Nord, Axel 
Nordblom, B. G. 
Norheim. Johan 
Nurse, Uriah 
Nymann, J. C. P. 
Olsen, Cornelius 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Sam 
Olsen, Terje 
Olson, Olof 
Olson, Otto B. 
Olsson-597 
Orchard. S. H. 
Petersen, Viktor 
Peterson-920 
1 'el i-i'son, J. P. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Petterson. Knut 
Pettersson-725 
Phair. Wm. 
Pick, R. O. W. 
Piedvache. E. 
Pollack. Paul 
Puika, Christ 

Robinson. W. 
Rohl. Werner 
Rollo, R. 
Rosan, Oscar 
Ruellans. Jules 
Rustad. Sverre 
Ryan, P. J. 

Silverberg. Harald 
Simonsen-1 1 47 
Sirvertsen. Hilmar 
Sjonborg. Harold 
Sjursen. Ingvald 
Smith, F. 
Smith, Valdemar 
Smith, W. 
Snow. Fred 
Soderman, Elis 
Sonderly, Fred 
Sorensen, N. 
Sorensen, Theo. 
Sorensen, T. M. 
Staaf-1464 

Stahn. Otto 
Stephan — 1455 
Sterne, Geo. 
Stringe, Claus 
Sundberg, A. P. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Sundholm, Erik 
Sundholm, Frans 
Svansson, Chas. 
Svendsen. Otto 
Svenson. Fred M. 
Swederius. C. E. 

Torgussen-482 
Torkkel. Kristian 
Tornkvist. Adolf 
Tralnes-524 
Tvedt, H. S. 
Tulin. Fritz 
Ulright. T. 
Untereln, F. 

Vincent, Jos. 

Vogel. A. 

Void, O. P. 

Von Asperen. Wm. 

Von Kleist, H. 

Vucich, V. 

Wiberg, John 
Wickmann, John 
Wiebke, Ernst 
Wijk. H. 

Wilhelmsen, Chas. 
Will, Clem 
Will. Geo. 
Williams, R. E. 
Wilson. Robert 
Winje, Hilmar 
Winter, John 
Wirnhof. P. 
Wright, C. 
Wright, W. B. 
Younger, A. J. 
Zimmerman. F. 



SEATTI 

Ahlstrom, Alf 
Albers. Geo. 
Aibertsen, Johan- 
nes 
Altonen, G. N. 
Andersen, A. -826 
Andersen, Fred H. 
Andersen, L. T. 
Andersen. V. V.-991 
Anderson, Alfred 
Anderson, Charlie 
Anderson, J. 
Anderson, J. Edv. 
Anderson. Wm. 
Arcedius, Ture 
Arnesen. Anders 
Baker, Ed 
Balke, E. 
Bauer, K. I. 
Beckwith, W. N. 
Berg, Thos. A. 
Berglund, A. 
Bluseth, M. 
Brurim, A. 
Cameron, H. B. 
Cameron, R. 
Campbell, John 



K. WASH. 

Canrenus, w. 

Carlson, L. P. 
Ceconi. F. 
Charlson, D. 
Christensen, Adolf 
Christensen, G. L. 
Christensen, K. 
Christoffersen, Hans 
Clausen, C. J. 
Cockran, R. B. 
Dahlgren, C. J. 
Dahlberg, Joseuh 
Daly. J. 
Didriksen. I. 
Dyk, C. J. Van 
Edvardsen, J. 
Eichman. W. 
Eklund, H. 
Eriksen. Fred 
Felix. L. 
Fergusen. J. 
Fjelstad. O. 
Forstrim. C. 
Francis, E. C. 
Gonderson. M. 
Gonzales, F. 
Grainger, J. 



Greenland, H. 
Gregor, Edvin 
Gronlund, O. 
Guke, John 
Gundersen, Anton 
Haglund, Carl 
Haldorsen, A. E. ' 
Hanley, J. 
Hansen, Alfred 
Hansen, Edvard 
Hansen, Henry 
Hansen, H. E. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hansen, Markus H. 
Healey, T. 
Hellman. Carl 
Henriksen, Joseph 
Hermansen, Albert 
Hermansen, F. 
Hermansen, L. 
Hofman, F. 
Hoving, B. A. 
Huhley, Howard 
Jacobsen, J. A.-779 
Jacobson, Oscar 
Jensen, G. A. 
Johansen, L.-1210 
Johansen, 0.-139 
Johansen, Wm. 
Johanson. H.-135 
Johnson, Chas. 
Jollnit. W. 
Jones, B. O. 
Jonsen, L. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, E. 
Johansen, Hans 
johannesen, J.-1119 
Johnson, Hjalmar 
Johnson, James 
Johnson, John 
Josefsen, F. W. 
Jurgess, J. A. 
Jungjahan, H. C. 
Keastner, Hans 
Kloperstrom, W. 
Knudsen. Sam 
Kongsvald. R. 
Kopplin, Robert 
Krallman, A. 
Laine. F. 
Larsen, A. -311 
Larsen, Axel 
Larsen, C. L. 

Larsen, E.-933 

Larson. Nils 
Lauren, J. O. 
Lehman, J. 
Lie, J. L. 
Lind. John 
Lind. K.-885 
l.indstrom, A. 
Lohlin, John 
Long, John 
Lorentsen, J. P. 
Madsen, C. H. 
Magnusen, Gr.s 
Magnusen, E. W. 
Martinsen. K. 
Mm yer. Albert 
Mayerkanys, W. 
Mayne. J. R. 
Meyer, Albert 
M:etenen, A. L. 
Morrisse. D. 
Munson, M. 
Nicklasen, H. 
Nilson, C. 
Nilson, H.-680 
Nilson, H. 
Nilson, O. 
Nissen, Eskeld 

SAIV PEDRO. CAL. 

Akselsen, Johan Hansen, Laurits 

Akerblum, Charles 
Allen. John 



Nissen, Jens 
Nuitanen, H. 
Oberg, C. W. 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. 
olsen, Carl J. 
Olsen, E. 
Olsen, E. M. 
Olsen, L. K. 
Olsen, Marlus 
Olsen, O. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, P. F. 
Olsen, P. O. 
Olsen, R. 
Olsen, Sam 
Paaso. Aud 
Paulson, C. 
Pearson, J. 
Pedersen, H. P. 
Federson, Lai s 
Pehrsing, H. 
Pendeitcast. E. 
Pendville. N. 
Petersen, H. A. 
Petersen, P. 
Peterson, John 
Pettersen, E. 
Petterson, Otto 
Pieper, H. 
Prell, H. 
Pringle, R. 
Ram in, Wm. 
Rasmussen, M. 
Reineh, H. 
Riordan, P. 
Robertsen. M. 
Ropne, J. T. 
Rude, A. M.-1447 
Salonen, E. 
Salvesen, K. 
Sandberg, A. 
Sarin. C. 
Schoien. J. 
Schwartskopf, P. 
Selander, G. 
Severtsen, I 
Simonsen, F. 
Smith, C. A. 
Smith. Paul 
Smith. Wm. 
Soderman, J. M. 
Sorensen, Chas. 
Sorensen, H. M. 
Sorensen. P. C. 
Sorensen, P. K. 
Sovik, M. 
Stahsing, W. 
Strom. A. 
Strom, J. G. 
Sullivan, W. J. 
Svensen, Sven 
Swansen, G. H. 
Swanson, John 
Swensen-1013 
Rwensen, T. 
Thayfon, John 
Thompson, Robert 
Thomsen. Ed 
Tliorsen. M. 
Thorsen, Theo. 
Wahrunberg, O. 
Walker, Geo. 
Warren, Wm. 
Wennerlund, A. 
Weizel. K. 
Wich. W. 
Wie, A. 
Wiedner, K. 
Wilson, Thos. 
White. J. 
Zelinski, P. 



Amelsen. Johan 
Amnell, Albert 
Andersen-736 
Anderson-907 
Andersen-912 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen. Edvard 
Andersen, Ingbret 

A. 
Andersen, Joseph 
Andersen, Salve 

i son, A. B.-1119 Jensen, Lewis 
Anderson, A. J. Jensen. Rasmus 

Anderson, Alfred Johannesen, Jacob 
\ nderson, A. G.-549 Johanson, J. -1462 
A nderson, Bertinius Johanson, Xatanial 



Hansen. Theodor 
l larding, w. J. 

[augan, Hilmar 
il. Imke, F. A. 
Hendersen. J. 
Hinze, A. F. W. 
Holappa, Oskar 
Hull, 1 1 
Janhunen, W. 
Janson, C. L. 

on, Carl W. 
Jean, H. G.-386 

i. G. L.-1461 



a. 

Anderson, F.-671 
Anderson, John 
A nderson, Martin 

son. Otto 
Anderson, S. 
Anderssen-853 
Armale, Frans 
Arvidsen. Axel M. 
Baker, John 
Bixby, E. 
Blomquist, H. 
Bock, Charles 
l : iga n. Patrick 
Boliman, Eric 
Boose, Paul-606 
Boren, William 
Bortram, Wm. 

(package) 
Brouford, Charles 
Bryndal, Henry 
Caramatic, Charlie 
Carlson, August 
Carlson, Eric 
Carlson, J. 
Carlson, J.-388 
Carnaghan, W. N. 
Cheodore, Bodiou 
Christophersen.Carl 
Clausaon, G. A.-804 Larson, 
i >ii man. Hilo Larson. Olaf Edvard 

Comerford, L. Lasskey, J. 

Crockstat. J. Lehtonen. V. 

Diedrich. Hermann Lindqvlst, Carl 



Johansson. Carl- 

1519 
Johansson, Carl L. 
Johndabl, Harry 
Johnsen, Carl-538 
Johnson-1281 
Johnson, Edward 
Johnson, Edward A. 
Johnson, Michael 
Johnson, P. 
Johnston, O. W. 
Johnson, Chas. 
Joraiison, P. J. 
Karlson. J. A. 
Karlson-388 
Karlsson, Gustaf 

Ernst 
Karlsson. John 
Kenna. Peter J. Mc 
Kihl. Harry 
Kittelsen. Laurits 
Klingstrom. Gun- 
nar 
Klover. H.-463 
Knudsen, Daniel 
Kristensen, Gustav 
Kristoffersen. H. B. 
Krlstoffersen, Karl 
A. 



Edlund, J. A. 
Eichel. Charles 
Erikson, Alfred 

Axel 
Fagerlund. G. E. 
Forsman, Arthur 
Frietrom, I. M. 
Giffin, Jim W. 
Green, F. 
Gronvall. Johan 

Frederik 
Grunbock. Johan 
Gunlach, John 
Gustafson, A. F. 
Gustafson. J. -432 
Gustafson, K. Os- 

kai 
Gustafson, Oskar 
( rustavsen, Ben 
I fa lversen, Wm. 
Ham. H. F. 
Hansen, Alf V. G. 
Hansen, Bernhard 



Lovenhjelm, 10. M. 
Lundberg, Erik 

T.unrlin. Charles 

Makelainen. J. 

Markmnnn, Hein- 
rich 

on, Victor 

Matteson, A. 

Mikklesen. C. 

Myhrvold. Chris- 
tian 

X-lson. T. H. 

Nielsen, Fred-629 

Nielson, N. C, 

Nissen, James 

.Nilson. V. <:. 

Nystrom, Emil 

Olsen, Andrew 
i. John B. 

Olsen, N.-502 
Olsen, Peder 
Olson, Adolf 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE RED FR0IT 



THE ONJLY STORE ON THE 
WATER FRONT OF HONOLULU 
EMPLOYING WHITE LABOR 
EXCLUSIVELY. 



SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 



FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
OIL CLOTHING, TRUNKS, 
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS 

THE RED FRONT 

COR. QUEEN AND NUANU STS. 
HONOLULU, H. I. 



MYRTLE CIGAR STORE 

Importers and Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. 

The only House keeping' a full line of 

Union-made Goods. 

T. J. FITZPATRICK, Proprietor. 

830 Fort Street. Honolulu, H. I. 



THE ISLAND MEAT CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Butchers 

Shipping and Family Orders Given Prompt 
Attention— Fresh Meats and Produce 

JAS. E. WESTBROOKE, Mgr. 

Telephone Main 76 .■«»»•. 

Fort St., opp. Love Bdg., Honolulu, n. T. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 

Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



XV. C. BERGIN, Proprietor, 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanu Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Olson. Benny 
Olson, W. 
Oosterhuis, R. 
Osterling. Emil 
Pedersen. Preston 
Persing, Henry 
Petersen, Charles 
Pettonen, K. H. 
Peterson, G. 
Peterson, Martin 
Rasmussen-446 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rasmussen, Olaf 
Rauer, H. 
Reid, James-326 
Robstad, Sorensen 

John 
Rohde, Robert 
Rosenblad, Karl 
Royden, W. H. 
Salvisen, A. 
Sandberg, Theodor 
Saunders, Carl 
Schilling, C. 
Schatze, Otto 



Sjonberg, Harald 
Sodergvist, Otto 
Soult. Theodor 
Staaf, Louis-1464 
Steffensen. Viggo 
Stolsten, Karl 
Strelow, Albert 
Svenson, Sven 
Svensson, Nicolaus 
Svensson, Thure 
Syvertsen, Isak 
Thallos. Mr. 
Thompson, Stephen 
Thorve, Gustav 

Danielsen 
Tomask. Math. 
Wahlstadt, Albert 
Walbergh, Joseph 
Warren, Fred 
Werner, Ruben 
Westerholm, Aug. 
"Whyne, Fred 
Wikstrom, Anton O. 
Zugehaer, Alex. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, Geo. 
Andersen, E. 
Anfindsen, O. 
Arntsen, E. 
Andersen, Lauritz 
Anderson, Ben 
Amerson, Olof 
Buch, D. 
Bernhardsen, K. 
Coffman, Milo 
Cedargren, A. 
Carlson, G. 
Christison, Harry 
Doyle, H. 
Dischler, P. 
Diedrichsen-786 
Engman, E. 
Eliasen, E. 
Farclig, B. 
Fergusen, J. 
Gasman, G. 
Horeldsen, Ch. 
Hansson, J. 
Hult, Wm. 
Hahuer, Fr. 
Hendrikson 
Halltham-1285 
Janhunen, F. 
Jones, Ch. 
Jordan, Ch. 
Jorgensen, P. 
Jorgensen, John 
Johansen, Martin 



Kent, S. 
Kuglund, C. 
Knudsen, S. A. 
Kolderup, K. 
Lillie, F. M. 
Lahde, Th. 
Lyche, N. 
L,inden, M. A. 
Lmdstrom, Fr. 
Magnusen, C. E. 
Martinsen, F. 
Mathisen, M. 
Meinking, W. H. 
Miettinen, A. E. 
Nyroos, O. J. 
Olsen, O. J. 
Olsen, S. 
Owens, John 
Olsen, C. A. 
Petersen-782 
Peterson, P. 
Pettersen-856 
Roberts, Ch. 
Rogind, S. 
Svenson, Sven 
Salversen, Sam 
Stevensen. J. 
Schmidt, Ch. 
Thomas, John 
Westgard, L. 
Wickstrom, A. 
Warren, Fr. 
Wilson, Rob. 



PORT TOWNSKND, WASH. 



Adams, Walter 
Allen, Frans 
Andersson, A. A. 
Andersson, J. 
Arcadius, Ture 
Arntsen. Erik 
teese, Henry 
Carroll, R. 
Cederstrom, Wm. 
Christiansen- 851 
Clough, H. R. 
Currie, James 
Donovan, John 
Erikson, Aleck 
Fogarty, J. P. 
Friedrickson, A. 
Gilhooly, H. 
Glouaguen 
Gustafson, Aksel 
Hansen, Edward 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, H. 



Jensen, Chas. 
Johansson, Knut 
Johnson, Maune 
Kiein, T. 
Klemettila, G. 
Krmtzer, Charles 
Knnigk, A. 
Lubastide, Joe 
I .;:rsen, L. J. 
Legallais, Jules 
Lie. Carl 

Lindstam, Olof A. 
Lundberg, K. H. 
Moen. K. E. 
Nielsen, N. 
Peterson, Charles 
Samuelsen, Krlst 
Schilling, Carl 
Weber, C. O. 
Wickstram, Anton 
Williams, Chas. 



TACOMA, WASH 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store closes at 6 p. in.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



1 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE — NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE, 



vWLW*^^>%*>rt%*W^<%s*SWl>%*^+'*S%****>*^^^ 



TACOMA, WASH. 1 



c a\ n The Union Cigar Store 

WHEN IN TACOMA 

FOR 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY AND 

PIPES. 

Local and 'Frisco Papers always on 

hand. 

2223 North Thirtieth Street. 

MERUIT TERRILL, Proprietor. 



HOQTJIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor 
call at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM AND ABKRHEEN 

For your Clothing, Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Shoes, Rubber 

Boots and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND GAPS 




WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Anderson, Harry 
Begowick, John 
Bjornstad, Nils 
Boock, Christian 
Borlin, J. 
Bray, J. K. 
Brussell, Ed. 
Buch, David 
Eidswaag, Peter 
Ekerlein, Frans 
Eslon, V. 
Evans, John 
Furlong, James 
Furst, Ragner 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Granbom, Emil 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hanson, August 
Horsley, R. S. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johanson, Karl F. 
Johnsen, Martin 
Jorgensen, Sofus 
Jorgensen, Walter 
Karlson, Oscar S. 
Kask, John 
Kristianson, C. F. 



Lorentzen, E. M.- 

866 
Lubke, John Von 
Mackay, Joseph 
Martinson, Holger 

E. 
Nielson, Niels 
Nilsson, Henry 
Norheim, John 
Olsen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pott, George 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Sarnde, M. J. 
Sjonborg, Harold 
Smith, A. 
Soderman, Oscar 
Starkey, Wm. 
Stoessle, Camille 
Thampson, Harry 
Thompson, C. M.- 

251 
Vestergren, Anton 
Waldron, Harry 
Weide, Paul 
Wideberg, Oscar 
Zellmann, B. 



PORTLAND, OR. 

Ahlquist, Harry Lindberg, John 



Anderson, Frank 
Braver, Dave 
Dahl, John A.-517 
Degeorges, Lion 
Dickson, Geo. 
iJrummond, Steve 
Eckberg, C. E. 
Filliet, Lorenz 
Fletcher, W. S. 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Gunluck, John 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Hellander, W. 
Hrelja, Frank 
Holmes, C. V. 
Horkman. T. 
Hansen, Hans Bas- 

berg 
Johansen, Soren 
Johansen, Edvard 
Jones, John 
Kohff, R. 
Katcharin. Jackob 

HONOLULU, H 



Linder-923 
Madsen, Capt. 
Magnusen, Sven 
McRae, Alx. 
Merin, J. B. 
Muller, Frank 
Nelson, Chas.-393 
Nilsen, H. 
Parker, Ross C. 
Revfem, Fied 
Richardson, Hilmar 
Rice, Patrik B. 
Shov, Lauritz 
Stephan, C. 
Saderlund, Chas. 
Wieting, Heinrich 
Wahlstedt, A. -778 
Westerberg, Nils 
Begovich, John 
Erlandson. Anton 
Fristrom. Ivar 
Grondahl, John 
Kristiansen, Ferd 



Borkman, F. 
Cole, H. 
Eggers, J. 
Hansen, M. 
Haroldson, C. 
Hillborn, F. 
Ilansson-1270 
Jnkkopsen, J. 
Kure, P. 
Nelson, S. H. 
Olsen, C. A. 
Ouchterlong, F. 



Passon, T. 
Peabody, F. 
Rohden, A. 
Rose, W. K. 
Sinlor, A. K. 
Sigvartsen, C. O. 
Sohrimper, F. 
Thorsen, T. 
Todt, J. 
Thomas, J. 
Wouters, H. 
Vatland, G. 



(Continued on page 16.) 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
— Visit — 

WALTER EHRLICHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing. Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 
be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS, 

JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 

UNION MADE 

Watches & Jewelry 
19 HERON STREET, ABERDEEN. WASH. 




UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOCiBL 

Watch for the Red Front, 
24 Heron Street. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



Yon can get good 

HONEST UNION-MADE GOODS 

FROM 

A. W. BARKLEY 

56 <; Street 

Becker Block, next to Bicycle Works, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 
He carries everything a sailor wears. 



Have your photographs made while in port by 

THE ABERDEEN ART CO. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 

Marine Views, Enlarging, Copying, 
& Crayon Portraits, Picture Frames. 

C. V. LOV, Prop. 
406 Market St. Aberdeen, Wash. 



FOR UNION-MADE 



Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Agency for Aberdeen Steam Laundry. 

Stand on entrance to Union Office. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



W. C. JUDSOIN 

... EXPRESSMAN ... 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
phone ••>. ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Sailors' and Loggers' Outfitters 

Clothing, Furnishing Goodr, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins. 



^x R Hf E T BLE GEO. FISHER 

Heron Street, ABERDEEN, WASH. 



News from Abroad. 



Turkey is mobilizing militia to sup- 
press the Albanian insurrection. 

Peace has been concluded between the 
Uruguayan Government and the revolu- 
tionists. 

Grain exports are increasing at all 
Russian ports, especially the exportation 
of wheat to England. 

A battle is imminent between the main 
forces of the Japanese and Russians in 
the vicinity of Mukden. 

A trafficker in nobility has been dis- 
covered in Berlin, Germany, who sells 
titles according to a regular price list. 

The main body of Hereros, surrounded 
by German troops in Southwest Africa, 
recently broke through the lines and es- 
caped. 

The German Reichstag will be asked 
for additional appropriations, so that 
the army may be increased 30,000 or 
40,000 men. 

Prince Herbert Bismarck, son of the 
famous "Iron Chancellor," died at Fried- 
erichsruhe, Germany, on September 18, 
aged fifty-five years. 

Consul-General Cordova, of Honduras, 
has announced that the boundary ques- 
tion between Honduras and Nicaragua 
will be settled by arbitration. 

A general assault upon Port Arthur 
began on September 19. It is said thai 
this movement is the final effort of the 
Japanese to capture the place. 

Turkey has deposited $25,000 in the 
Ottoman Bank, at Constantinople, to 
settle an American's claim for illegal 
seizure of property at Smyrna. 

Hans, the Berlin horse that thinks, 
has been examined by a body of sci- 
entists, who declare him to be really 
educated and not a trick horse. 

The Italian Government has under- 
taken to secure the return of the an- 
cient cope, stolen from the Cathedral 
of Ascoli and subsequently bought by 
J. P. Morgan. 

Queen Helen of Italy was safely deliv- 
ered of a son on September 15 at the 
royal palace. The infant has received 
the name of Humbert and the title of 
Prince of Piedmont. 

Gratified at a message of respect from 
President Palma of Cuba, sent through 
Archbishop Chappelle, of New Orleans, 
the Pope has sent his blessing to all 
inhabitants of Cuba. 

It is understood that Russia is trying 
to negotiate for the purchase of the Brit- 
ish steamer Calchas, captured by the 
Vladivostok squadron while on her way 
from Puget Sound to Japan. 

The French Government authorities 
forcibly expelled the Barnabite Com- 
munity from their establishment at Paris 
recently. A large force of municipal 
guards and firemen executed the expul- 
sion. 

A British sailing vessel, supposed to 
be the bark Lucia, struck a mine re- 
cently off Port Arthur. Only one person 
of those on board of her was rescued. 
It is considered probable that the vessel 
was running the blockade. 

The London Daily Express' Tokio cor- 
respondent states that Japan has de- 
cided to organize a large volunteer fleet 
for patrol duty and the protection of 
Japanese shipping, the cost to be de- 
frayed by public subscription. 

Prince Adelbert, third son of Emperor 
William of Germany, after three and a 
half years' service as a sailor, has passed 
the examination for naval officers and 
will shortly begin a year's service on the 
Asiatic station as a lieutenant on board 
the cruiser Hertha. 

The Norwegian steamer Vircola, which 
recently arrived at Hammerfest, Nor- 
way, reports that she met the Ziegler 
relief expedition steamer Frithjof on 
August 27 in latitude 79 degrees north 
and longitude 52 degrees east. The 
Frithjof up to that time had been una- 
ble to reach Franzjosefland. 






14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



Philadelphia (Pa.) labor representa- 
tives have declared that the trade-unions 
of that city will fight the "Open Shop" 
to the end. 

All members of the Amalgamated As- 
sociation in Mahoning Valley, Pa., have 
decided to strike against the Carnegie 
Steel Company. 

John McBrearty, a shoe manufacturer 
;it Philadelphia, Pa., employing more 
than .'S00 men and women, has asked Hie 
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union to union- 
ize his factory. 

The Shenango tin plant, at Newcastle, 
Pa., lias resumed operations in full in 
all departments, after being closed down 
Borne two weeks. The order affects over 
2,000 workmen. 

The Associated Carpenters of Phila- 
delphia, Pa., are seeking to enjoin the 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and the 
Amalgamated Carpenters from interfer- 
ing with their work. 

The Executive Council of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor has decided to 
recommend to the San Francisco con- 
vention that uniform laws be adopted 
by centra] labor bodies. 

It is estimated that the lockout and 
■-dike in the building trades at New 
'lurk has cost the men $000,000 a week 
in wages, a total of $3,000,000 for the 
five weeks of the struggle. 

The Employers' Association of the 
Building Trades of Luzerne county, Pa., 
has declared open warfare upon union 
labor, and will make a stand for the 
"Open Shop" in every branch of the 
building trades. 

The Conciliation Board to adjust the 
dispute between the Republic Iron and 
Steel Company and the Amalgamated 
Association of Iron and Steel Workers 
over the wage scale has been selected and 
met in Chicago recently. 

Thirty-five mills of the Republic Steel 
ami Iron Company which had been closed 
for a week re-opened on September 12, 
end 30,000 men returned to work at a 
reduction of 10 per cent in wages, as a 
result of an arbitration agreement. 

The Brotherhood and Amalgamated 
Carpenters, of Philadelphia. Pa., have 
voted not to join the Allied Building 
Trades Council of that city. The ma- 
jority vote was in favor of affiliation, 
but the required two-thirds was not 
given. 

Nine hundred men have been thrown 
nut of employment by the closing down 
of the three branches of the Interna- 
tional Harvester Company and McCor- 
niiek & Deering divisions in Chicago and 
the plant at Piano, 111. The shutdown 
will continue for an indefinite period. 

The sum of $428,500 was paid out to 
the Pennsylvania Railroad shop employes 
:ii Altoona, Pa., last pay-day. an increase 
of $51,500 over last month, when the 
smallest sum in years was paid. The 
full time for the shops and re-employ- 
ment of suspended men is expected to 
increase next month's pay to close to 
$600,000. 

A written contract, covering the con- 
ditions agreed to by officials of the New 
York Subway and the unions of all 
classes of employes on the elevated road, 
has been signed. The main point in the 
agreement is that it prohibits the mo- 
tormen from striking in the next three 
years. The motorrnen are to receive 
$3.50 a day for ten hours' work, instead 
of for the nine-hour day they demanded. 

George Stevens, Secretary of the local 
council of the Amalgamated Meal Butch- 
ers' Union, at Omaha. Neb., was rccenth 
fined $25 and costs by United States 
Judge Munger for violating an injunc- 
tion of the Federal Court, restraining th< 
packing-house strikers from interfering 
with mm union men. Thirty-four others 
were fined $20 each and a proportion of 
the costs. They were all ordered com- 
mitted until the fines were paid. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



C. V. JACttSON 

UNION CLOTHING STORE 



Union -Made ClotHing, Hats, 
Shoes and FxirnisHing Goods 

Union-Made Goods of all 
Descriptions Whenever 
Possible to Obtain Them. 

A Fair Wage and Square Deal is Our Principle 



406-408 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WESNGORD, Proprietor. 



First-Class Board and Lodging 

Bi asonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



The Humboldt Lodging House 

K. IIOKGES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE IN 
EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 

BY THE 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

•103 Fill ST STREET, EUREKA. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City or County on short notice. 

HALTINNER & JOHNSON, Proprietors 



CITY SODA WORKS 

PETER DEI.ANEY, Proprietor. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda. 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilia and Iron, 
etc. Solo agents fur Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in Enter- 
nrise Lager Beer. 

SIS F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Win . I. -sale and Retail. 

Has Removed to 439 Second St. 

CORNER OF F, 

White Labor Only. i:i EUSKA, CAL. 



THE MODEL 

I iiii>ii-mnde GlotbJns ami n full line 
of .Men's Wear. 

The Model $3.50 Shoes 

Orders taken for Union Tailor- 
ma ii 

AUG. GUSTAFSON, 437 Second St. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Alan. 



Board and lodging, $5 per week. 
Single meals. 25c. Beds, 25c and 50c. 



322 First Street, between 1) and E, 
EUREKA, (A I.. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in town. 



CORNER FIRST AM) D STREETS. 



WHEN IN PORT CALL AT 

South Bay Hotel 

FIELDS LANDING. 



J. B. BIRD, Proprietor. 



Good Hoard ami I oil-in-, by day, week 
or month. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 




From 
Maker to Wearer 



The only Clothing IvNtiibliftbmeut on the Pacific Coast selling: goods at less 

than Eastern prices. 

THE BLUE FROINT 

Manufacturer* and Retailers 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AM) FURNISHINGS. 

SU 11111I SI » 1'lltST AVENUE. SEATTLE, WASH. 



Thomas McPtierson's Cigar Store 

N<; Wf»l Main Street, Senttle, Wash.. 

Abreast of P. C. S. Co.'s Dock. 

ALL KINDS OF 

I 11 ion- mail I- i i i;ars ami Tobacco* on 

Hand. 



BONNEY & STEWART 
UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia St*., Seattle, \\ ash. 



Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Navigation and Nauti al Astronomy 

CAFT. IV. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Miss Helen C. Smith, - - Instructor 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
Ball, and British. 

2296)6 FirMt Ave. Phone Rlaek 6424. 

Capt. Sorensen's Navigation School 

Established 1899. 

105 PAS*ED— NO FAILURES 

Room 59, . . Safe Deposit Building 

First Avenue, foot of Cherry Street, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



"WHEN IN PORT 

Trade with the Old Reliable 

SAWTELLE STORE 

— Dealer in — 

PI RE GDI BOOTS, CANVAS 

BOOTS, LLAMAS \ M> OILSKIN'S. 

In fart everything appertaining to 
Seamen'* OuttltM. 



| J t r= rt SAWTELLE BUILDING 

frntn 
I Union Office 



EUREKA 



O'CONNOR'S CIGARS 

The popular favorites. Equal in flav- 
or and aroma to cigars of twice their 
cost. They are made by union men, 
therefore always reliable and in good 
condition. Best value ever known. 

C. O'CONNOR 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

rs.tz Second Street. Knreka, t'al. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



EXPRESS NO. 101 



Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

F. F. JOHNSON. 

Phone Hood 350. PORTLAND, OR. 



Headquarters for Seamen. 



NEW YORK LODGING HOUSE 

Albert Hallkh, Prop. 

Newly Furnished Rooms. Entirely Remodeled 

Prices Moderate. Phone Hood 352. 

203 RURNSIDE STREET. 

Cor. Front, near First PORTLAND, OR 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Phone Red 1786 

IRA A. CAMPBELL 

PROCTOR IN ADMIRALTY. 
Rooms 210-217 Bailey Building. 

Seal He, Wash. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR EXAMINATION 
NEVER HAD A FAILURE. TERMS MODERATE 

Navigation 

— AND — 

Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. JAS. MARSHALL 

614 First Ave. , Seattle Compasses Adjusted 




CLOTHING HOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Boots, Shies 

HeadquarterH for Seamen'* Outfit*. 

All Union Made Goods 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. H ABE RE R, PROP. 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE 

Carries a full line of CiKnr*, Tobacco* 

and Smoker*' Article*. 
UNION-MADE! GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone Ind. 118. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



John MulUn, who was employed as 

fireman on the steamer Ventura some 

two and one-half years ago, is requested 

ommunicate with his wife at 69 

Clyde St., Anderston, Glasgow. 

('. Roach, who left the British ship 
Lynton at San Francisco in February, 
1900, is requested to communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. .Mary Roach, 4 Queen 
St.. Queenstown, Ireland. 

John McGovern (alias John Wilson), 
last beard of in New STork .March, 1902, 
when on board the S. S. Calburga, is 
inquired for by his mother at Belfast, 
Ireland. Anyone knowing his present 
whereabouts will please notify the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



■ft 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Pine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cat. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



LETTER LIST. 



(Continued from page 13.) 
EUREKA, CAL,. 



Anderson, Chas. 
Anderson, Lars-735 
Anderson, Nels 
Andersson, J. B. 
Andersen, Henry 
Asmussen, MacC. 
Brown, Frank 
Carlson, Pastor L. 
Carlson, Axel 
Hansen, Hans T. 
Hansson, Gust. Hj. 
Holmberg, Alfred 
Johnson, John 
Klint, Sam 
Lovi, Alfred 



Lehnhard, W. 
Meyerkana, Valter 
Peterson, Henry ■ 
Peterson, Kari A. 
Pederson, John 
Preufs, Fred 
Patuyanski, P. 
Spressles, Fred 
Stefany, Joseph 
Sorensen, Thorn 
Sanders, Frank 
Sanders, L. 
Walsh, P. R. 
Weiss, Wilhelm 
Zemmerman, Fritz 



Letters in the Office of the Fishermen's 

Union of the Pacific Coast 

and Alaska. 

Andresen. Thoralf Jacobsen, C. B. 

Annus, John Nelsen, John 

Bonde, Ths. Nelson, Peter 

Dahl, Ben Tishel, Mathias 
Bliasen, Edv. Nik. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



John A. Connelly, recently on the 
steamer Siberia, is inquired for by his 
sister, who has some important news for 
him. Address, Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

James Murphy, a fireman, who left the 
steamer Robert Dollar last June, is re- 
quested to call at the United States 
Shipping Commissioner's office in San 
Francisco. 

Emil Enberg, a native of Finland, 
aged about 30 years ; last heard of in 
San Francisco a year ago, is inquired 
for by Captain S. A. Enlund, ship Glen- 
ard. Address, W. R. Grace & Co., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

G. L. Jensen, who sailed from San 
Francisco about January 12 last on the 
schooner Emma Utter and discharged on 
arrival at Gray's Harbor, is requested 
to call at the United States Shipping 
Commissioner's office at San Francisco. 



The Monogram Cigar Store 

All kinds of Union-made Cigars, Cigar- 
ettes and Tobacco. 

150 EAST STREET, COR. HOWARD. 

GUS HOLMGREN, Proprietor. 
Agent for the Steam Laundry. 



Forsberg Bros. 

== TAI LORS ■ 



36 Geary Street 

Room 29. Phone Black 4711. 

Suits made to order First-class work 
from $20 up. Only. 



44 EAST STREET 

Room 6— Phone Bush 34f 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

ALTERING AND REPAIRING 



J. M. RICHARDS, Prop. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH - SIDE - HOTEL 

800 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and King' Streets. 



The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and lodging, $5 per week. Ail 
rooms single. 



FRANK JOHNSON 
SAN PEDRO HOTEL 

6 HOWARD STREET, S. F. 



Newly furnished. Large and airy 
rooms by the day, week or month, at 
reasonable rates. 

FIVE MEAL. TICKETS, $1. 



California Undertaking Co. 

Private Residence Parlor* 

R. J DEVLIN, Manager 
W. L. llNDSCY. SECRETARY 

CORNER POST 406 POWELL ST 

6AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 

OPtN DAY AND N4GHT TELEPHONE MAIN »Y1 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall. 

We Sell the Kind of Goods You Require. 

EXTRA STRONG HICKORY SHIRTS \ 
BEST OVERALLS ( immM . ADCI 

GOOD LUMBER SHOES ( UNI0N LABEL 

STOCKTON FLANNEL UNDERWEAR) 

ALSO A PULL, LINE OF GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS. 
Look at our Goods. You will be pleased. No trouble to show them. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

Of California. 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAI $3,000,000.00 

PAID UP CAPITAL AND RESERVE $1,725,000.00 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or Trustee. 

Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court pro- 
ceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully 
selected. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, President. Horace H. Hill, Vice-President. H. Brunner, Cashier. 




A. ANDERSON, 



The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Corner Drumm and Commercial Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone James 4846 

A new building erected especially for 
sailors. Latest improvements, clean and 
light rooms, bath, reading and dining 
rooms. First class board and lodging at 
reasonable rates. Gospel service — Sun- 
days, 3:45 p. m., and Wednesdays, 8 
o'clock p. m. All welcome. 

Missionary and manager 



UNION STORE 

FOR UNION SAILORS 
AND FISHERMEN 

By making cash sales only we are 
enabled to sell at the lowest figure. 



STABENS & FRIEDMAN 

CLOTHIERS and OUTFITTERS 

257-259 Pacific St. 

Between Battery and Front. San Francisco 



JOE HARRIS 

Sea-faring . Men's . Outfitter 

Ready Made Uniforms. 
Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., near EAST 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



H. WARRINGTON 

SAILORS' FURNISHING GOODS 

Union-made Shoes, Hats, Caps, Under- 
wear, Tobacco, etc. 



You'll find everything strictly first class. 

711 Davis Street, near Broadway. 

(Opposite Tier 9.) 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry 

SAILORS* OUTFITS 

Eest quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL. WITH THE UNION LABEL. 

W'e give you a square deal. 



THE SUTTER 

Furnished Rooms 

At Reasonable Rates 

106 Stewart St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

WM. STADT, Proprietor. 



EXPRESSING 

— Done by — 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Cor. East and Mission Sts. 



iiio Store 



J. GOODMAN 

110 Berry St., San Francisco 

The Best Goods in the Market. 



M. A. MAHER 

Men's - Furnishing- - Goods 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Workingnien's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 



206 EAST STREET, NEAR HOWARD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 



Domestic and Naval. 



SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James Lennox, a native of Woolwitch, 
England, aged about 50, last heard of 
about twelve years ago in London, Eng- 
land, is inquired for by his brother, 
William Lennox. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 




Difficulties between French and Col- 
onial fishermen on the Banks are said 
to be growing more acute. 

The National Board of Steam Naviga- 
tion held its thirty-third annual meet- 
ing at Philadelphia, Pa., recently. 

Captain Richard Adams, a widely 
known shipmaster, died at Bakersville, 
N. J., on September 12. For the past 
few years Captain Adams has lived a 
retired life. 

The Philadelphia bark James A. 
Wright, bound for Havana, stranded re- 
cently at Harbor Island, and floated, 
full of water. It is thought she can be 
towed in safety to Nassau. 

The steamer Frederick, from Baltimore 
for Savannah, went ashore recently at 
Cut- off Channel, but was subsequently 
floated and passed down Cove Point, 
Md., apparently undamaged. 

Steamer lines plying between English 
and Canadian ports have reduced steer- 
age rates from Liverpool to Quebec, 
which may mean renewal of the war be- 
tween the Cunard and Continental lines. 

The steamer Longfellow of Wilming- 
ton, Del., from Wilmington to Lake Su- 
perior with a load of dynamite, sank off 
Highland Light, Mass., on September 9. 
There were sixteen men in the crew. All 
were saved. 

Kear-Admiral Walker, head of the 
Panama Commission, declares that the 
United States intends to keep the two 
open ports in the Canal Zone, in spite 
of any protests which may be made by 
the Panama Government. 

The mail boat Virginia Lake, at St. 
Johns, N. F., on September 6, from 
Northern Labrador, reports that the sea- 
board was swept by a fierce gale two 
weeks previously. Much damage was 
done to fishery property along the coast, 
and five schooners were driven ashore, 
resulting in the loss of eleven lives. 

A tugboat master, who recently re- 
turned to Boston from the wreck of the 
steamer Longfellow, reports that the 
vessel is a dangerous menace to naviga- 
tion around Cape Cod. She lies in thir- 
teen fathoms of water, one mile off 
shore, abreast of the Pamet River Sta- 
tion. One mast projects out of the 
water. 

The four-masted schooner Margaret 
Thomas was launched at Thomaston, Me., 
on September 10. Her keel is 192.8 feet; 
beam, 40 feet, and depth, 19.6 feet; gross 
tonnage, about 1400. Captain J. W. Ba- 
lano, of St. George, will command her. 
Washburn Bros., the builders, will begin 
work immediately on a three-masted 
schooner. 

The Halifax agents of the Norwegian 
bark Kong Sverre fear that the vessel 
has been lost at sea. She sailed from 
Durban, Natal, on May 20 for Halifax. 
and was last heard of at St. Helena, 
whence she sailed on July 20. The Kong 
Sverre hailed from Sandcfjord, at which 
port she was built in 1870. She regis- 
tered 463 tons and had a crew of twelve 
or fifteen men. 

Secretary of the Navy Morton has ad- 
dressed a letter of commendation to Mid- 
shipman J. Reidy, a member of the third 
class at the Naval Academy, in recog- 
nition of the bravery he recently dis- 
played in jumping overboard and rescu- 
ing from drowning C. H. Hohman, a sea- 
man in the navy. Midshipman John 
Rodgers and Ensign J. M. Enochs have 
been commended for similar acts. 

A proposition is before Secretary of 
the Navy Morton providing for the ap- 
pointment of a board of naval officers 
to inspect the merchant marine of the 
country and report to the department 
the repairs and changes necessary to con- 
vert each ship into a man-of-war in the 
event of a national emergency. It is 
desired that this information shall be 
on file at the Navy Department. This 
is the practice in foreign navies. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






With the Wits. 



Good Enough Reason. — 
"No change in winter hats this year," 

Said weary Mr. Hockett. 
"At least no change in yours, my dear, 

For there's none in my pocket." 



He Had One. — "Is there a literary 
club around here anywhere?" asked the 
long-haired visitor. 

"Yes," replied the editor, reaching 
under his desk, "are you a literary 
man ?" 



Keeping His Promise. — "But," pro- 
tested the small burglar, "you promised 
to give me half of all we made." 

"Dat's all right," replied the burly 
one, "but we didn't make this haul. 1 
made it." 



Generously Thoughtful. — Ragson Tat- 
ters — "Say, boss, gimme the price of a 
meal. I'm nearly star — " 

Stingiman — "Can't do it, me poor fel- 
low, but the next man you ask may, so 
here's a toothpick. 



A Substitute. — Witte — "Is this your 
advertisement in the paper: 'Wanted — 
A good strong mule to do light dray- 
man's work ?' " 
Drayman — "Yes, that's mine. Why?" 
Witte — "What's the matter? Are you 
going on a vacation?" 



Poor Thing. — Nell — "I wonder what 
Miss Ann Teek is doing with that trans- 
lation of Virgil's 'Aenied.' Trying to 
appear learned, eh?" 

Belle — "No; she picked it up in the 
book store to-day, and the opening line 
about 'Arms and the man' attracted 
her." 



Not in His Repertoire. — "A musician 
out of work, are you?" said the house- 
keeper. "Well, you'll find a few cords 
in the woodshed. Suppose you favor me 
with an obligato." 

"Pardon the pronounciation, madam," 
replied the bright tramp, "but Chopin 
is not popular with me." 



Good Managing. — "I don't suppose 
you ever really had a trade or a profes- 
sion," said the housekeeper. 

"Oh, yes, I have, lady," replied the 
tramp. "I've been a manager all my 
life." 

"Indeed?" 

"Yes'm. I've always managed to get 
enough to eat." 



LUNDSTROM'S 



ONION 

MADE 



$2.50 HATS 



PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market Street, opposite Central 
Theater, and 005 Kearny Street. 



Country Orders solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Sun Cured 
Tobacco 




Save Front 
ol Wrappers 
and Pouches 
lor 
Premiums 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




Union made 

Clothing 



J3SUED BYMTHORIIYtf 




REGISTERED 



m 



We were one of the first firms in the 
United States to put the union label on our 
garments. As we manufacture our own 
stock, all our clothes bear the union label. 

Other stores in San Francisco have a few union-made lines 
to show union men. 

Every thing is union made in our establishment. 
In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a 
saving of middlemen's profits. 
Ready-made suits and overcoats from $10.00 to $35- 00 
Made-to-measure clothes from $10.00 to $45 00. 




S. IN. WOOD dt CO, 

740 Market St., San Francisco. 




James A* Sorensen Co* 

Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 



103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 

TELEPHONE JESSIE 2821 



Below Mission 
san francisco 



All Watch Kepairing Warranted for two years. Eyes Tested 
Free by an expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

The Big Jewelry Store 



SMOKERS 



See that this label ( in light blue ) 
appears on the box from which you 
are served. 




~is6ui-J By AuUwrityot ikc'cTgaj Makers' 'international union of Amenti 

Union-made Cigars. 

<Uu3 SttliflfS T»att»#C*«e«o^tMiwita^*^iiAby*MtolWS31 
iKiafPC fMEaWA*i*rWMtro;iur.CJW umo*e» A*tnu jncjTMffawoevolecrotHiad 
wwjn of fix Mftflfli HATtPlAI ind * Wimi* *fi f«K£ Or Th£ Cfi*n IhiitfaBwe ream*** 
tlw« Oaan U) *ii snufe*rs OBMbow; !.*■* twrtd 

Aj' inhinqcniu upon *jui LiOtl nil b» pen taei tccai'^ to I 



C.H.I.VefAmeriai 



L32323£3 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

Smoke Union -Made Cigars that Bear the 
Above Label 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between iKng and Berry Sts., Snn Frnnelsco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods. Hats. Caps. Trunks, Valises. Bags, etc.. Boots 
Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly UNION 
MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. . 

If you want first-class soods at the lowest market prices give me a call. 
Do not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




CflC BATTERY STREET 

VUU COR. WASHINGTON STREET 

WcSitom hou,. SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest and beet 
equipped private Nautical School In the United States, 
Graduates prepared for the American and British 
Merchant Marine examinations. Warrant officers of 
the Cnited States Navy prepared for examination for 
commissioned officers. Special course for cadets en- 
tering the United States Naval Academy and Ameri- 
can Merchant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a text book and guide 
for navigators, is now on sale at the school. Prospect- 
ive purchasers, or those interested in navigation may 
call at the school and inspect them. The book is well 
bound, contains about 400 pages of readable matter, 
PRICE $8.00 



THIS WKKK 

At Hale's 

Men's Night Shirts, 45c 

Of Muslin or Flannelette 

And all sizes from 15 to 19. 
52 in. long and made gener- 
ously full, a fine line of 
patterns. No matter 
whether you like military 
or turn-down collars , 
they're both here ; both at 
45c. 

Pajamas $1.50 suit. Made of 
good heavy flannelette, well 
made, nicely trimmed, in blue, 
tan and pink stripes, all sizes. 
$1.50 suit. Boys' sizes $1.00 



San Francisco's 

8-Hour Good Goods Store 

Market St., Near Sixth 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Sailors' and I in n,< u'» Clothing; 

null General Supplies. 



COLBY & FITZPATRICK 

17% Steunrt Street, 

l!et Market it Mission, - Sun Francisco 



...SMOKE... 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNIONJVIADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTEKY STREET. 



Hoffman's 
Preferencia 

clear UNION MADE Havana 

MASCOT) Best 5 cent 
BLUE CAP j Cigars 

FACTORY, 111 TURK STREET 



STILL ON DECK 



ED. ANDERSEN 



7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY 

LUMBER HOOKS 



Scotty's Milwaukee 
Sweaters and Jackets 

Have stood the test against all competitors 

I.nke Faring: Men All Kion It. 

SWEATEUS SENT BY 
KAIL FOR $3.30 
Beware of Imitations 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTY" 
III MENOMENEE ST., MILWAUKEE. WIS. 



M 



Ji 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Jouryial of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XVIII. No. 2. 



SAX FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1004. 



Whole No. 886. 



THE GERMAN TRADE-UNIONS. 



Mem bership, Finances and Methods. 

Limits of "Political Action" Defined. 



IN A RECENT publication Mr. Judson Grenell, the 
American publicist, described industrial condi- 
tions in Germany, and incidentally made several 
misleading and erroneous statements regarding the 
trade-unions of that country. The statements refer- 
red to read as follows : 

I am told that in the German trade-unions proper 
about 200,000 members ore represented. I am also 
told that, taking the Socialist societies into account, 
it can be said that the membership of organized 
workingmen aggregates 1,000,000. There is such a 
close relation between most of the trade-unions and 
the Social Democratic political organization that it 
is impossible to differentiate them with any accuracy. 

In order to do justice to the great majority of the 
organized workers in Germany the writer will en- 
deavor to describe the different forms of trade- 
unionism at present existing in the German Empire. 
This description, which must necessarily be brief, 
will be confined mainly to a statement of facts and 
figures, leaving the reader to draw his own conclu- 
sions as to which particular class of organization is 
entitled to be termed the "trade-union proper." 

The organizations of workingmen in Germany 
which may be classed as trade-unions can be placed 
roughly in five groups. The total actual membership 
of all organizations at present (July, 1904) exceeds 
1,330,000. The average yearly membership during 
1902-1903 and the funds in the treasuries of the 
various organizations in the last quarter of 1903 are 
shown in ihe following table: 





Membership. 


Total 
Funds on 
hand in 
Marks (1 
Mark 25c) 




1902 


1903 


National Federation of "Free" or 
"Social Democratic" Trade- 


733,206 
10,0'JO 

102.851 
79,238 

100,561 
56,559 


887,698 
17,577 

110,215 

91,440 
101,177 
68,724 


12,973,726 


Hirsch-Duncker, or "German" 




3,311,746 


Federated "Christian" Trade- 


455,970 


Independent "Christian" Trade- 
All other Trade-Unions, National 


289,138 

331,561 






Total 


1,082,541 


1,276,831 


17,362,141 







The first-named group is composed of sixty-three 
national unions whose general character is in all re- 
spects similar to our American national unions. United 
in a National Federation of Labor, with headquarters 
at the capital, Berlin, these organizations, with 9,264 
locals in all parts of the country, form the backbone 
of the German trade-union movement, comprising at 
this time (July, 1904) fully three-fourths of the 
organized workers in that country. Among the sixty- 
three national unions, the Metal Workers have the 



largest membership, namely. 160,135. Five organiza- 
tions have exceeding 50,000 members, and seven oth- 
ers have a membership exceeding 20,000. The Print- 
ers are the most thoroughly organized, not less than 
84.08 per cent of all persons working at that trade 
carry the card of the national union, which is affil- 
iated with the Federation. The next eight trades 
best organized in their respective crafts are named 
in order, as follows: Sculptors, Glass Workers, Plas- 
terers, Lithographers, Glovemakers, Coppersmiths, 
Stone Setters and Masons. Fifty-nine trade papers 
are published by as many national unions; the total 
circulation of these papers is 1,044,650. In addition, 
the Federation publishes an official organ, now in its 
fourteenth year, which is issued weekly at head- 
quarters. A comprehensive description of the numer- 
ous benefit features, which are carried to higher per- 
fection from year to year, would properly form the 
subject of another article. 

The total income of the sixty-three "free" national 
unions for 1903 was 16,419,992 marks ($4,104,998) ; 
the total expense during the same period was 13,729,- 
336 marks ($3,432,234). The principal items of ex- 
pense were: For strikes, $1,132,418; out of work 
benefits, which are paid by only twenty-eight organ- 
izations, $317,513; sick benefits, paid by only twenty- 
five organizations, $236,014. 

The foregoing is a summary of the first group. As 
to the assertion that it is impossible to differentiate 
most of the trade-unions from the Social Democratic 
political organization, I can say without fear of con- 
tradiction that not a single statute can be found in 
which any of the so-called Social Democratic trade- 
unions have declared lor (he principle or programme 
of Socialism. To make the foregoing more specific, 
I will quote Mr. C. Legien, Secretary of the Federa- 
tion of "free" trade-unions, and also a Social Demo- 
cratic member of the German Reichstag. In a com- 
munication to the writer, under date of July 15, 1904. 
Mr. Legien writes, as follows: 

The separation of the political party organization 
from the trade-unions is a sequence of historic de- 
velopment in Germany, and was brought about mainly 
through the enactment oi legislation obstructive to 
the organizing of unions. Hence it follows that such 
separation is expedient also for organizing purposes, 
because organizations which are formed for the strug- 
gle for higher wages should include all workers, and 
keep out none on account of political differences. 

While it is true that most, but not by any means 
all, members of "free"trade-unions are Social Demo- 
cratic sympathizers and, if entitled to vote, as a rule 
vote for the candidates of that party, it is also true 
that Socialist societies and trade-unions are distinctly 
separate organizations. In connection herewith it 



must be remembered that at the last general election 
(June, 1903) the Socialist candidates for Parliament 
received a total of 3,010,771 votes out of the 12,531, 
000 votes past in the Empire. German authorities 
estimate that only about two-thirds of the members 
of the "free' trade-unions are entitled to vote. Thus, 
even if the entire voting strength of these unions went 
for the Social Democratic candidates it would account 
for only one-sixth of the total of votes cast for this 
party. When taking into consideration the generally 
recognized fact that in Germany the Social Demo- 
cratic party is the only political party which may be 
justly called a workingmen's party, and when consid- 
ering further that sixty-five of the seventy-nine Social 
Democratic members of Parliament are, or have been, 
bona fide workingmen and members of "free" trade- 
unions, it is certainly not at all strange that a strong 
mutual sympathy exists between "free" unionists and 
prominent leaders in the Socialist movement. Th. 
"free" trade-union papers support the Social Demo- 
cratic party more or less because that party is ever 
ready to work and vote for trade-union legislation. 

The purely local unions are placed separately in 
the second group. About 15,000, out of the total 
membership of 17,577, are located in Berlin and its 
immediate vicinity. These unions arc opposed to 
national affiliation mainly for personal reasons, and 
that fact seems to be their only reason for keeping 
apart from their respective national unions. Gen- 
erally speaking, it may be said that members of the 
independent local unions are inclined to favox moid 
radical action than the comparatively conservative 
membership of the national unions. Unlike other 
German labor organizations, no information is avail- 
able regarding the financial affairs of these local 
unions. Since the strength and activity of the local 
unions is confined almost exclusively to one huge 
city, and as even there they are outnumbered more 
than nine to one by the members of national unions. 
it will be seen that they are of very little significance. 
The relation of these organizations to political par 
ties is identically the same as that of the "free" trade 
unions, and it is customary in Germany to classify 
the local unions as Social Democratic trade- unions. 

The third group, known in Germany as Hirsch 
Duncker trade-unions, also as "German" trade-unions, 
is a federation made up of twenty-one unions. A 
few of these organizations are national, others arc 
confined to cities or to certain sections of the countrj 
only. Sixty-eight per cent, of the total membership 
(110,215) is divided between three national organiza- 
tions, namely, Machinist:; and Metal Workers, Fac 
lory Employes and Mercantile Clerks. The remain 
ing eighteen unions are without any significance and 
could not undertake to fight for an improvement in 
their condition, even if supported by all affiliated 
unions. Many of the Hirsch-Duncker unions are 
similar to the American Federal labor unions, having 
within their locals workers of various trades and 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



occupations. The income of all Hirsch-Duneker 
unions for 1903 was 929,412 marks ($232,353) ; the 
total expense was 804,120 marks ($201,031), of which 
$62,551 was paid for strike and out-of-work benefits; 
$42,472 for the maintenance of offices and officials' 
salaries, and $31,605 for printing and distributing 
official journals. 

While the "free" trade-unions do not disavow their 
sympathy for- the Social Democratic party, the 
Hirseh-Duncker unions claim to be strictly neutral 
in political matters. This claim, which is reiterated 
on every occasion, is, however, not borne out by their 
actions. In the first place, the Hirseh-Duncker union- 
ists, or at least their leaders, never miss an oppor- 
tunity to denounce Socialism. Further, as several of 
the prominent Hirsch-Duneker unionists represent the 
Liberal (Freisinnige) party in Parliament, and as 
Dr. Hirsch.' one of the founders of these unions, is 
also a life-long member and champion of said Liberal 
party, it is generally understood in Germany that the 
members of the Hirseh-Duncker unions support the 
candidates of the Liberal party just as persistently 
and loyally as the "free" trade-unions support Social 
Democratic candidates. In concluding those remarks 
on the Hirseh-Duncker form of unionism, it is inter- 
esting to note their conspicuously poor progress in 
organizing. While both the "free" and the Hirseh- 
Duncker unions were organized at about the same 
time, 1865-1869, the former are now fully eight times 
stronger numerically than the latter. 

The "Christian" trade-unions form the fourth 
group, with 192,617 members, all told. Affiliated 
with the Federation of "Christian" trade-unions are 
only 91,440 members, belonging to twenty-two organ- 
izations. The two largest affiliated unions are the 
.Miners, with 40,813 members, and the Textile-Work- 
ers, with 16,616 members. This leaves 38,993 mem- 
bers for the twenty affiliated unions, and it is not 
necessary to point out the unimportance of twenty 
professedly national unions with an average member- 
ship of 1,699. The total income of the federated 
"Christian" unions in 1903 was $169,563; the total 
expenditures, $138,111, of which $38,757 was for 
strike benefits and strike expenses. 

The unaffiliated "Christian" unions are six Railway 
and Postoffice employes' associations, and four or- 
ganizations of miscellaneous trades. All the "Chris- 
tian" trade-unions are confined to Middle and South- 
ern Germany; in fact fully four-fifths of the mem- 
bership of the federated "Christian" unions is found 
in the Rhine- Westphalia district. 

The Christian trade-unions owe their existence 
mainly to the tireless and energetic organizing work 
of the "free" trade-unions. To explain this appar- 
ently strange condition it is necessary to go a little 
more fully into German party politics. The strength 
of the (Catholic) Central party lies principally in 
the southern part of the country, and between this 
party and the Social Democrats, who are continually 
making converts in the former's strongholds, is waged 
an unceasing bitter warfare. About ten years ago 
the leaders of the Central party realized that some 
action must be taken to counteract the baneful 
influences of the "free" trade-unions who brought 
Social Democratic sympathies into their ranks. Thus 
the "Christian" trade-unions were organized. It 
must not be assumed that the "Christian" unions are 
serving Christianity any more than other German 
trade-unions, but in order to be eligible for member- 
ship a person must be a Christian, either Catholic or 
Protestant. "Free" trade-unionists accuse the 
"Christian" trade-unions of carrying on a systematic 
stuffing of their membership statistics. In one spe- 
cific instance the secretary-treasurer of a certain 
"Christian" union had entered a large number of 
delinquent members as fully paid up; after it was 
proven that the members in question did not pay the 
dues accredited to their accounts the treasurer re- 
• fused to divulge the source from whence he had ob- 
tained this rather substantial amount of cash. 

The official papers of the "Christian" unions — there 
are twenty-three of these publications — occasionally 
refer to the Central party as "our party," and no 
one who is at all conversant with facts will deny the 
existence of a close alliance between the Central 
party and the "Christian" trade-unions. It must be 
said, however, that, particularly during the past few 
years, many "Christian" unionists have begun to look 
with distrust upon their self-appointed sponsors, who 
have many times ignored their petitions to vote for 
earnestly desired legislation. 

The various German State Governments, as well as 
the Federal Government, with their army of officials, 
have no objections to workingmen belonging to 
Hirseh-Duncker or "Christian" trade-unions. Many 
high Government officials approve of these organiia- 



tions to such an extent that they honored their con- 
ventions by sending an official representative. Of 
course, no such distinction is shown to "free" trade- 
unions, and it is taken for granted that no one need 
expect any favors of the bureaucracy anywhere in the 
Empire if it be known that he or she holds member- 
ship in a "free" trade-union. The same feeling of 
aversion toward "free" trade-unions prevails among 
clerics and employers everywhere, but the aggressive 
hostile spirit comes to the light of day mainly through 
associations of employers. 

Both the "Christian" and the Hirseh-Duncker 
unions are absolutely opposed to Socialism, and were 
it not for the strong hold which the Central party 
and the Liberal party have on their respective pro- 
teges there would be nothing to hinder these organ- 
izations from combining and working together for 
common ends in an outright anti-Social Democratic 
labor union. As it is, each of the two organizations 
is more or tees committed to a political party; never- 
theless both accuse the "free" trade-unions of being 
solely responsible for the division in the trade-union 
movement because these organizations are adjudged 
guilty of flirting with the Social Democratic party. 

In the fifth and last group are thirty-one unions, 
which can not properly be placed within any of the 
foregoing groups. The larger of these organizations 
are the Innkeepers' Assistants, with 18,000 members; 
the Civil Musicians, with 11,000 members, and the 
Mercantile Assistant Laborers, with 9,000 members. 
Definite financial statements are available from only 
eleven organizations, and it is difficult to obtain very 
reliable information legarding the actual status of 
these very much scattered organizations. Many of 
them can be classed as "free" or Social Democratic 
unions, but being dual organizations of larger 
national unions of the same craft they are not eligi- 
ble for affiliation with the National Federation. 

P. SCHARRENBERG. 



Scapegoats of the Slocum. 

The report of the Local Inspectors on the 
burning of the steamer General Slocum ap- 
pears to be an effort to exonerate the Steam- 
boat Inspection Service rather than a sincere 
attempt to give a full and accurate statement 
of all the causes of the disaster. The investi- 
gation, it is true, purports to be solely an 
inquiry into the conduct of the licensed offi- 
cers of the vessel, but it really goes further 
and takes up matters with which the Super- 
vising and Local Inspectors are concerned. 
In dealing with these it advances claims that 
arc irreconcilable with undisputed testimony. 

The Board of Inquiry finds specifically 
that certain officers of the steamer did not 
carry out rules and regulations that have the 
force of law, and that an absolute lack of 
discipline characterized the behavior of the 
crew. It traces the causes of this fatal inef- 
ficiency to the neglect of the master and the 
pilot, inasmuch as they had failed to exercise 
the men in the use of the life-saving appar- 
atus and pumps and had neglected to see that 
the equipments required by law were in com- 
plete working order. These conclusions are 
undoubtedly sound and the proved miscon- 
duct justifies the resultant revocation of the 
licenses of the culpable officers. 

It is found, on the other hand, that the 
steamer was properly beached on North 
Brother Island, and that this was the nearest 
available point for such a purpose. This 
finding is supported by the evidence of many 
masters of steamers plying in the eastern 
waters of the port, most of whom were wit- 
nesses to the occurrence from the time the 
fire broke out off the Sunken Meadows until 
the Slocum was run ashore. The conclusion 
is further fortified by the testimony of other 
eye witnesses and by the independent investi- 



gation made by nautical experts for the Her- 
ald soon after the disaster. 

No fault could be found with the report if 
it ended here, as both these matters directly 
touch the conduct and efficiency of the steam- 
er's officers — a limitation of inquiry to which 
the Board insists it was confined. But it 
goes beyond this and takes up the question 
of the equipment — a matter which primarily 
belongs to the administration of the Steam- 
boat Inspection Service. 

Notwithstanding irresistible evidence to 
the contrary, the Board makes the extraor- 
dinary claim that the Slocum's life-preservers 
were, as a whole, ample in quantity and in 
good condition, and that not a single life was 
lost by reason of any inefficiency of such ap- 
pliances. This, it will be observed, has 
nothing to do with the conduct of the licensed 
officers of the steamer, though it is a matter 
of grave importance to the Inspectors, whose 
duty was, and is, to see that such devices 
are both ample and in good condition. The 
only way to test whether such requirements 
of the law are observed is through careful 
and frequent inspection. Were such inspec- 
tions made, and, if not, where does the re- 
sponsibility rest ? 

The Board specifically claims that the ap- 
palling and pathetic loss of 959 persons was 
entirely due to other causes, and asserts that 
even had the Slocum been furnished with 
double the quantity of life-saving equipment 
the crew were so incompetent that not another 
soul could have been saved. It insists, more- 
over, that no bodies found at the bottom of 
the river had life-preservers, and that two 
such appliances taken from persons saved by 
their use and carefully tested were in perfect 
condition. 

This appears to be an attempt to prove 
what is irreconcilable with other known facts. 
It is certain that proper inspections were not 
made of the Slocum or of many other vessels 
in this district. Perhaps, as sometimes as- 
serted, this neglect may be due to the paucity 
of available Inspectors, but the truth remains 
— the inspections were not made. Had the 
technical examinations been carried out con- 
scientiously and rigorously the incompetency 
of the Slocum's crew must have been discov- 
ered and the sufficiency of the equipment been 
determined. The evident effort, therefore, 
to exculpate the Steamboat Inspection Serv- 
ice and to lay all the blame on the dead and 
on the officers and crew of the steamer will 
not deceive the public. — New York Herald. 






German Seamen's Union. 



During the second quarter of 1904 the 
membership of the German Seamen's Union 
increased from 2,769 to 3,542, which is a 
net gain of 773 members in good standing. 
The funds of the organization were increased 
by 3,432 marks, making the total cash on 
hand at headquarters and agencies, 87,176 
marks ($21,794). A strike at Stettin, which 
caused considerable expense, was settled sat- 
isfactorily. With the assistance and ap- 
proval of Headquarters, the Lubeck agency 
recently entered into an agreement with the 
various vesselowners of that port. The agree- 
ment provides for better conditions and 
shorter hours, and a general improvement 
in all the minor details of wage and working 
conditions. Unless three months' notice to 
discontinue is given by either party, the 
agreement will hold in force until April 1, 
1907. 






A 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







the Atlantic Coast = 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 




Slocum Lesson Unheeded. 



The public memory of either benefits or 
calamities is proverbially short. It is barely 
three months since the General Slocum trag- 
edy shocked the whole country, and already 
the indications are that "the incident is 
closed." None of those responsible for the 
affair have as yet been put into jail, or even 
fined; and the chances that they will ever 
be punished are becoming more and more 
remote. 

In view of all the damning facts in this 
case, it is hard, indeed, to decide which party 
is the more blameworthy and criminal, the 
men who were directly and indirectly respon- 
sible for the Slocum disaster, or the general 
public, whose contemptible apathy and sel- 
fishness make it practically certain that the 
former will escape the just punishment for 
their crimes, thus encouraging others in law- 
lessness. It is curious, too, that this same 
public, which is so deaf to the call of duty, 
is always swift to howl about its rights as 
"the innocent third party," whenever it is in 
the least inconvenienced by a strike or lock- 
out of workingmen whose very means of 
living may be threatened. If the general 
public would only expend as much energy 
in the discharge of its duties as it does in 
the insistence upon its rights, lawbreaking 
would soon become such a costly and danger- 
ous business that not even the wealthiest 
corporations would care to engage in it. 

But, letting that phase of the matter go, 
it would seem natural that the public, out of 
simple regard for its own safety when trav- 
eling, would bestir itself in securing such leg- 
islation as would forever make impossible 
the recurrence of another Slocum horror. 
But here also is shown the same forgetful- 
ness, the same apathy and the same spirit 
of "every man for himself, and the devil 
take the hindmost." It is, or should be, 
known to every intelligent person that the 
general faultiness of our Navigation Laws 
had as much as anything else to do with the 
frightful loss of life attending the burning 
of the Slocum. Not only that, but what little 
really effective law there is relating to this 
subject is left to be enforced by notoriously 
inefficient and corrupt officials, who owe their 
appointments to circumstances which few of 
them would be willing to have publicly 
known. With the present universal venera- 
tion for "pull" and money, politics and graft 
are inseparable from the management of 
every public service department. Even so 
conservative a newspaper as the New York 
Herald said, in commenting on the investi- 
gation of the Slocum disaster, that the Unit- 
ed States Steamboat Inspection Service is 
"infected with dry-rot," and in the strongest 
kind of language denounced "the criminal 
impotence and brutal inadequacy," etc., of 
certain features of the Navigation Laws. The 
Herald is noted all over the world for its 
moderation and its policy of understating 
rather than overstating facts, and when it 
editorially uses such language as that quoted 



the reader may be sure that the actuality is 
a good deal worse even than the presentation. 

Now, what is the public going to do about 
it? Concurrently with grand juries, munic- 
ipal and private investigating committees, 
etc., a Eederal Commission was appointed to 
probe the Slocum affair, with the understand- 
ing that suitable recommendations as to 
needed legislation would be formulated for 
the guidance of Congress. The Commission 
may still be in session for aught anybody 
seems to know — or care. It is now currently 
reported, however, that the greater part of its 
labors have been in the direction of fixing the 
responsibility for the disaster, and that such 
few recommendations for legislation as it 
may make will only apply to vessels built 
after said recommendations shall have been 
enacted into law. .That is to say, all of the 
present enormous fleet of passenger vessels 
will be permitted to live out their lives — 
thirty, forty or fifty years, perhaps — with- 
out a change of construction, and under the 
very conditions that led to the burning of 
the Slocum ! As to the necessity of employ- 
ing efficient seamen on such vessels, or others, 
it is a foregone conclusion that the Commis- 
sion will make no recommendations whatever, 
on the self-evident (?) ground that, of 
course, the owners will not risk the safety of 
their patrons or property by employing in- 
competent crews ! Then there is the well- 
founded probability that even such legislation 
as the Commission may have in view will be 
sidetracked for years to come to make room 
for measures of more national scope and im- 
portance, the tariff, the currency question, 
the Isthmian Canal, etc. 

Altogether, the outlook for a reasonably 
speedy change for the better in the present 
conditions of our merchant marine is any- 
thing but encouraging. Again we ask: 
What is the public going to do to prevent the 
recurrence of such shocking tragedies as the 
burning of the Slocum, with its one thousand 
and odd victims ? Over sixty of these, their 
bodies unidentified, lie buried in one grave, 
marked by a monument bearing the inscrip- 
tion: "We have not died in vain." It is to 
be hoped they have not. 



"Public office is a public trust," which 
probably explains why public office is so often 
prostituted for private gain. On the other 
hand, if the public was less trustful and 
more watchful the principle that "the office 
should seek the man" might eventually be- 
come an actual condition in politics. In 
that event, it is disheartening to think how 
many public offices would go begging for fit 
incumbents ; so it may, after all, be best to 
allow "public office" to remain "a public, 
trust." 



When a man's mind once becomes tinc- 
tured with snobbishness his usefulness to his 
fellowmen is destroyed forever. Snobbish- 
ness is the antithesis of manliness, and snobs 
are of the stuff of which slaves are made. 



Purchasing Power of 'Wages. 

Rarely a day passes but one may read some 
newspaper article in which the writer 
"points with pride" to that "indubitable sign 
of national prosperity," to wit, the fact that 
the increase in wages has kept ahead of the 
increase in the cost of living. Of course, 
every one knows that the plain truth is not 
the long suit of a trust-subsidized newspaper. 
Therefore, when statements like the forego- 
ing appear on the editorial page, it is dollars 
to nothing that the writer has had his cue 
from certain sources. 

It is no doubt true that in the highly 
skilled and thoroughly organized trades 
wages have kept pace with the increase in 
the cost of living. But, an overwhelming 
majority of the workers of this country are 
unskilled or work at occupations requiring 
but little training or preparation. So great 
are the numbers in this class that their wages 
in the aggregate amount to much more than 
the wages of the skilled workers. Now, the 
cold, hard fact of the matter, supported by 
incontrovertible statistics, is that wages for 
unskilled labor are lower to-day than five 
years ago, and that the cost of living has 
increased in the meantime on an average 
twenty per cent. That is, the great bulk 
of our population is actually earning less 
than formerly and paying more than ever for 
what it consumes. How does that fact gibe 
with the statement that wages have kept 
ahead of the increase in the cost of living? 
Apparently it is understood by certain news- 
paper editors that so long as there is a grain 
of truth in their generalizations there is no 
need of any effort at differentiation. 



Shipping Notes. 

The Equinoctial gale on the Atlantic Coast 
caught many sailing vessels napping. The 
result has been many shipwrecks, with a con- 
siderable loss of life. The Seamen's Union 
has also been called upon to pay a number 
of Shipwreck Benefits to members who lost 
all their belongings. And yet gentlemen who 
profess to take great interest in the welfare 
of seamen think that they demand and receive 
ridiculously high wages ! 



Secretary Henry Griffin, of the Cooks' and 
Stewards' Association of the Atlantic Coast, 
reports that the membership of his organiza- 
tion has lately been substantially increased 
by new recruits drawn from every one of the 
leading steamship lines in New York. All 
that is now needed, Mr. Griffin thinks, is 
good organizing work to take advantage of 
the openings obtained. It is estimated that 
there are 10,000 or more men sailing on this 
Coast serving as cooks and stewards, and in 
other capacities comprehended under the 
term, "Steward's Department." 

The crew of the New York schoolship 
St Mary, which arrived in New London, 
Conn., a few days ago, after a European 
(Continued on pige 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



Half the town of Watzrous, N. -\!.. was 
destroyed by ;i flood on October I, and 
at least twelve persons were drowned. 

Colorado Republicans have indorsed 
Governor Peabody's policy and renom- 
inated liim mi a "law and order" plat- 
form. 

Complete returns of the vote for Gov- 
ernor in the recent Maine election slmw 
a Republican plurality of 27,130, against 
33,384 in 1900. 

A pneumatic tube system between Chi- 
cago and Milwaukee i- being organized 
to transport mail and packages at two 
miles a minute. 

George Frisbie Hoar, United States 
Senator from Massachusetts, died at 
Worcester, in that Stale, on September 
30, aged 7s years. 

Attorney-General Moody i- generally 
regarded as a probable successor to the 
late George P. Hoai a- United States 
Senator from Massachusetts. 

Nine persons were killed ami many 
others injured by an explosion caused 
by a street-ear colliding with a box of 

dynamite on the track at Melrose, Ma--., 
on September 21. 

It i- reported that Colonel David 1!. 
Ileudei -on. of Iowa. e\ -Speaker of the 

Bouse of Representatives, has suffered 
so much from an old army wound that 
his mind ha- become affected. 

President Roosevelt, responding to 
resolutions presented to him by the In- 
terparliamentary Union, formally an- 
nounced that lie would soon call a second 

conference at The Hague. 

II was reported at National Demo- 
cratic headquarters recentlj that United 
state- Senator William A. (lark, of 
Montana, has given Sl.000,000 to the 
committee for campaign purposes. 

At the convention of the American 

Bankers' Association, in New York, re- 
cently, a plan to raise a guaranty fund 
to reimburse members from losses by 
dishonest employe- was defeated. 

Another semi-monthly payment of 
$500,000 on the $4,600,000 Government 

loan was made on October 1 by Hie man 

agemenl of the St. Louis Exposition. 

The total amount paid up to date i- $3, 
408,1!'.'. 

Thirteen men were recently lashed at 
the po-t and li\e stood in tin- pillory at 

the New Castle i Del. i workhouse. Se\ - 
era! women tried to force their way 

into the prison to see the punishment 

inflicted. 

A terrific Hood struck the city of Trin- 
idad, Col., and the whole valley along 

Las Animas River on September 30, 
devastating a wide section ami causing 
a money loss which may reach several 
hundred thousand dollars. 

The price of beef at Chicago was in- 
creased on September 30, and half a 
icnt a pound was tacked on to the price 

of better cut- of meats, making the price 

two cents a pound highei than the val- 
ues exacted during Hie packillL'-hoii-e 

strike. No reasons were given for the 
latest advance. 

E. .1. Davis, Commissioner of Crown 
Land- and a member of the Ontario Leg 
i-laturc. ha- been unseated a- a result of 

a petition against his return from North 

York at the bye-election in February, 

1903. This leave- i he Government with- 
out a majority on the floor. The Speak- 
er, however, has the privilege of casting 

a vote in the ca-e of a tie. 

The High Court of Tutuila, Samoan 
Islands, in recent decisions, ha- ruled 
that the Chinese Exclusion Acl and the 

Alien Contract Labor Act- of the I 

States do not apply to Tutuila. There 
i, ;, local law prohibiting the landing of 

the Chinese in the Island- absolutely. 

The Court is of the opinion that if the 

Chinese Exclusion Act was in force, then 

i dinese already admitted in the United 
State- may claim the right to land and 
reside in Tutuila. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANT'S 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the liest (ioods Manufactured for 

Seamen, 
toil MILL FIND THE UNION I.A1SKI. ON OUR GOODS ALSO 



jUIPPIVIAIN BROS. 

New Clothing Store 

Goods Direct from the Factory. 
UINIOIN STORE UINIOIN GOODS 

Wleldwald Block, Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAIN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

Wholesale Dealer in tbe Choicest of Old Wines 

and Liquors 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at the lowest San Francisco prices. 

We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries 

Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
a little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spending 
all you earn, but save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 
splendid opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San 
Francisco of the South today. Don't forget that. We oiler you lots on 
graded streets with cement sidewalks and curbs, trees planted and water laid 
in, from $350 to $450, at the exceptionally easy terms of $25 cash and $10 
per month until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for 
your lot it will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity 
slip by, but see John Anderson, next door to the new postolfice. 

PECK & ANDERSON. San Pedro, Cal. 



JOHN HELANDER 

— Dealer in — 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CIGARS 

Fourth Street, near liencon, 

San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sis., San Pedro, Cal. 

— Dealers in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Herald and all San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Headquarters for Pure DruK". Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT STREET, OPP. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

BRAND & LAWYER 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausage of all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by TJ. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 



G. W. HARVEY 

The oidTime Expressman 

Solicits Your Patronage. 

Give Him a Call. 

Stand at Front St., San Pedro, Cal. 



FRED SYENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 
AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT 8TREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELI AS WE11EHG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, opposite S. I*. Depot, 

*\\ PEDRO, C\L. 

I oioii- Made risiirK, Toliaeeox, Pipes, 
Notions, Ete. 



People's Bargain Store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

GentN* Furnishing Goods, Hoot* and 

Shoes. HatN and Caps. Sailora' 

OntfltN. 

M. LEVY. Proprietor. 
I hi.. Frout and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



S. W. Express 



HANS HENRIKSEN, Proprietor. 

Give your old Comrade a call 
when in San Pedro 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

— Dealer in — 

GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN, also GREEN 

FRUITS and COUNTRY PRODUCE 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Phone No. Ill 4. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL 



-OF THE- 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



= GISTE 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 
stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
In it. The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 
four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
Loose labels in retail stores are Counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
using them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Oran K e, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, MASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union 
Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis. P. W. Eisenbels. 

E1SENBEIS £ SON 

— Dealers in — 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Crackers. 

SiiipH* Stores a Specialty. 
310 Water St. Port Townsend, Waxh. 



Clias. A. Prague, Mgr. Chas. E Coon, Pres 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St.. Port Tonnsmd, Wash. 

\\ areliuiiNe: ll.-n-i l.-n Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend. \\ a-.li. 

\\ IIOI.KSALE AND RETAIL DEALERS 

l.V GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest and 
fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

— Dealer in — 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St.. next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Dealers in LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS and 

VEGETABLES. Wholesale and Retail. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

— Dealer in — 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



CHAS. A LUCAS! 

UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Tom Courtney, of Courtmacsherry, 
County Cork, Ireland, is inquired for by 
the British Consulate at San Francisco; 
Cal. 

William Hansen, o cook who left the 

acl ner Ethel Zane about three months 

ago in Everett, Wash., i- inquired for 
by his wife. Any one knowing of his 
whereabouts please address Box 2156, 
San Pedro, Cal. 

The following named seamen are in- 
quired for by the Consulate of Sweden 
and Norway at San Francisco: Harry 
Nil-iii. from Asker; Williaw Anderson, 
from Stockholm; Emil Swanson, from 
Gothenburg; E. <;. Persson, from Goth- 
enburg; Johan Emil Engebrektson, from 
Gothenburg; George Nordstrom, from 
Christiania; Jacob 11. Dalland, from 
Siglevik; Olof M. Nelson, from Sweden; 
Frithjof Ellingsen, from Drammen; Jo- 
hannes Gudmundsen, from Stavanger* 
K. A. Kolderii)) Weasel, from Chris- 
tiania; Johan Sander Peterson, from 
Brunnefjall; Ed. 15. Herwan, from Stock- 
holm; Edwin Bredesen, from chris- 
tiania. Hansen, from Aakenes; 
Martin Olsen, from Vatteroen; John K. 
W. Johanson, from Kastlosa; F. M. Lof- 
berg, from Partille. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



<« d«^:a^ r*~~*** v*~..: MA » 



^ 



Pacific Coast Marine. 

C^g j~- j~; ■—■ *-■ ~ - ~ - -*;■ >£■ j^. *£■ j£- j *- j£- >g j& >^- X. ^. >*>;• jr . jr . jr. jr. jr. jr. jr. jr. jr. jr. jr. jr. £*&, 

Francisco, and now out thirty-seven days from Hono- 
lulu for South Bend, Or. The Echo is noted as a fast 
vessel, despite this slow passage. Some time ago 
the Echo went from Astoria to Cape Town, thence 
to Newcastle, Australia, to Honolulu and back to 
Astoria, handling several cargoes, and all in the good 
time of eight months and twenty-seven days. She is 
commanded by Captain Young. 

United States Judge Dole, of Honolulu, T. H., has 
given a decision against George Leslie, a seaman who 
went to the Islands from San Francisco to work for 
the Interisland Steam Navigation Company, and was 
recently discharged and sued the Company. His em- 
ployment was under a contract that he would have 
permanent employment with a chance of promotion. 
He was discharged after two years of employment, 
and after he had once been promoted, and the Court 
held that the Company was not under any further 
obligation. 

The list of overdue vessels at San Francisco is 
growing slender. Only two vessels remain on the 
board, but from present appearances they are likely 
to remain for a long time to come, or until posted as 
missing, both having been out much too long. They 
are the British schooner Advance, 03 days from a 
Mississippi port for La Guayra, across the Gulf of 
Mexico, and the British bark Shakespeare, 132 days 
out from the west coast of South America for Barba- 
does. On October 2 the French bark Moliere, at the 
end of a long passage of 60 days from Shanghai for 
Royal Roads, B. C, was crossed from the list of over- 
dues. The Moliere was quoted at 5 per cent for rein- 
surance. 

The case of the Michigan Steamship Company, own- 
ers of the steamer Progreso, which was destroyed by- 
explosion on December 3, 1002, while lying at the 
Fulton Iron Works, San Francisco, on a petition for 
limitation of liability, has been finally submitted to 
United States District Judge De Haven. If the Court 
limits the liability of the Company to the appraised 
value of the wreck, there will be but $15,020 to meet 
the following claims for damages, if proved: Joseph 
and Margaret Rex, $50,000; Frank and Ann McGuire, 
$50,000; Eleanor E. Dow, $50,000; Mary Nelson, $50,- 
000; Edward Kane. $10,750; Sabina Gallagher, $10,- 
000; Robert E. Gibson. $11,150; George W. McNer- 
ney, $5,000; Hugh McGill, $5,500. 

Adolph Freiberg, formerly master of the scow- 
schooner Mabel and Edith, has filed a libel on that 
vessel in the United States District Court at San 
Francisco for $50, alleged to be for wages due. Frei- 
berg recites that he was engaged as master on the 
schooner on August 28 and made three full voyages 
between that date and Steptember 23, and that the 
freight earned amounted to $229.30. This freight 
money he alleges should have been distributed as 
follows: Ten per cent to himself, two-thirds of the 
remainder to himself, he to pay two-thirds of all 
dockage, towage and water charges and the wages of 
the crew. This, he asserts was not done and demands 
of the owner, B. H. Tietjen, $50 to settle the account. 

DIED. 

Lorenzo R. Gillespie, No. 59, a native of Michigan, 
aged 3 4, died at San Francisco, Cal., October 1, 1904. 

James Moran, No. 407, a native of Ireland, aged 
56, died at San Francisco, Cal.,' September, 1904. 

Russo Erasmo, No. 124, of the Fishermen's Union 
of the Pacific Coast and Alaska, a native of Italy, 
aged 45, died at Karlnk, Alaska, August 17, 1904. 

F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine 
law in this city. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Rooms 8 and 10, 508 California 
street. Telephone Grant 163. 



The United States training-ship Intrepid will be 
launched from the Mare Island (Cal.) Navy Yard 
on October 8. 

The old American bark Hesper is being converted 
into a barkentine at a Puget Sound port. She is 
owned by George E. Billings, of San Francisco. 

The schooner Volant, a well-known vessel in the 
coasting trade, has been sold by H. C. Lassen to the 
North Coast Commercial Company, a new corpora- 
tion. 

The new steam-schooner Northland, recently 
brought to San Francisco from Monterey in a water- 
logged condition, was taken to Hunter's Point dry- 
dock on October 2, to be repaired. 

The British steamer Crusader, recently reported 
as having been captured by Japanese cruisers and 
taken into Hakodate, arrived on September 30 at 
Shanghai from Astoria, Or., with a cargo of lumber. 

A British Court of Inquiry at San Francisco on 
October 1 suspended the license of Captain William 
Davis for two months for negligence in connection 
with the recent stranding of the British ship Ditton. 

The Pacific Mail steamer City of Para, which has 
been laid up at the Union Iron Works, San Francisco, 
for some weeks, has been completely overhauled and 
practically made into a new class. Captain A. Zee- 
der will resume command of the vessel. 

Samuel Gomez has filed a libel in the United States 
District Court at San Francisco against the Ameri- 
can bark Sea Witch for $5,000, alleged to be dam- 
ages due for injuries suffered by a fall from the 
main topgallant yard while on a voyage from Alaska. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on September 
30 stated that the British ship Barcore, from Tacoma, 
Wash., had arrived at Falmouth, and reported hav- 
ing lost some sails, shifted her cargo and jettisoned 
part of the cargo to the extent of 3,000 bags of bar- 
ley. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 3 : The British schooner Ad- 
vance, 61 days from a Mississippi port for La Guayra, 
35 per cent; British bark Shakespeare, 131 days from 
the west coast of South America for Barbadoes, 8 
per cent. , 

The Great Northern liner Minnesota sailed from 
Norfolk, Va., on October 2 for the Pacific Coast. The 
Minnesota will be the largest steamer to enter the 
Pacific, having a length of 608.6 feet, breadth of 73.5 
feet, and depth of 41.5 feet. She was built at New 
London, Conn., and her gross tonnage is 21,000. 

The long overdue British ship Crown of Germany, 
seventy-three days out from Shanghai for Royal 
Roads, B. C, passed Tatoosh on October 1, and was 
therefore crossed from the overdue board after hav- 
ing been posted for many days. The rate of rein- 
surance was 5 per cent. Little speculation took place 
on the vessel. 

The Occidental and Oriental liner Gaelic sailed 
from San Francisco on September 30 on her last 
voyage to the Orient. Upon her return she will sail 
by way of the Orient and Suez for Liverpool, to be 
laid up or sold by the White Star Company, and 
Captain William Finch, who has long been her mas- 
ter, will take her home. 

The steam-schooner Cascade was recently launched 
from the Bendixscn yard at Eureka, for C. R. Mc- 
Cormick & Co. The Cascade is 153.4 feet long, with, 
a beam of 36 feet and depth of 12.5 feet. Her gross 
tonnage is 504. After loading a cargo of lumber at 
Eureka the vessel will be towed to San Francisco to 
have her machinery installed. 

The Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company, 
which has for years operated the steamers Columbia 
and George W. Elder between San Francisco and the 
Columbia River, Or., is to be hereaiter known as the 
San Francisco and Portland Steamship Company. 
R. P. Schwerin, at the head of the Pacific Mail Com- 
pany, is to have full charge of the line. 

Captain Johnson has been placed in command of 
the steam-schooner Westport, succeeding Captain 
Smith, whose license has been suspended as a result 
of a collision between the Westport and Pomona 
some weeks ago. Captain Pearson takes the schooner 
Alice Kimball, vice Lorentzen, and Captain Andreses 
takes the South Bay, vice Captain Jamieson. 

The steamer Enterprise, with passengers and 
freight, to sail from San Francisco for Hilo and 
Honolulu, will tow the sailing ship Marion Chilcott 
all the way to Honolulu. The Chilcott, now an oil 
carrier, is laden with a full cargo of crude pil, and 
the shortage in the supply at the Hawaiian metropo- 
lis makes her early arrival there imperative. 

The British ship Bardowie, for some weeks past 
on the overdue board at San Francisco, was crossed 
from the list on September 28, a report having been 
received that she was recently spoken at sea, though 
the position and date are still unknown. The Bar- 
dowie is now out 175 days from Geelong, Australia. 
for Falmouth, and a rate of 15 per cent has been 
quoted for reinsurance. 

The schooner H. K. Hall, which arrived at Tacoma, 
Wash., on October 2, from China, reports that during 
the first part of her passage and when near the Shim- 
atin Islands, she encountered two very severe ty- 
phoons, the second of which did so much damage to 
the vessel that she has gone to Winslow for repairs. 
The barkentine Jane L. Stanford, also at Tacoma 
from the Orient, encountered three strong typhoons 
during the voyage, but came through them without 
any serious damage. 

Some anxiety is felt for the barkentine Echo, 
owned by the Simpson Lumber Company, of San 



Geo. E. Nalder, a member of the Sailors' Union, 
No. 555, is inquired for. Anyone knowing anything 
as to his present whereabouts please notify the 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Information is wanted regarding the whereabouts 
of Sam Larkin, at one t:me sailing from San Fran- 
cisco. Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Bagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches, and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters. Boston, M\ss., Sept. 27, 1 004. 
Shipping fair; general situation quiet, and pros- 
pects dull. 

Wm. H. Fra/.ier, Agent.. 

Providence (11. I.) Agency, Sept. 28, 1904. 
Shipping fair. 

James Wilson, Agent. 

New York (N. Y.) Agency, Sept. 26, 1904. 
Shipping slack; situation slightly improving. 

John Coebett, Agent. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 

1 1 1, aim. i aimi;ks, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1904. 
Shipping dull; Branches meeting with good suc- 
cess. 

15 Union st. Daniej. Sullivan, Secretary. 



mi 






OFFICIAL 





SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 3, 1904. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., P. Scharrenberg presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping dull. The Quarterly Finance Com- 
mittee reported having found books, bills and cash 
on hand correct; on motion the report was adopted 
and the committee discharged. A donation of $50 
was made to the striking textile workers at Fall 
River, Mass. 

Notice — Members having been nominated for dele- 
gates to the International Seamen's Union of America 
((invention must notify the Secretary of the Commit- 
tee on Ballot before noon, Saturday, October 8, if 
desiring to have their names placed on the ballot. 
A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 20, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping very dull ; pros- 
pects poor. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Red 208. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1904. 
Shipping dull; many vessels still laid up. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 24, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. General situation un- 
changed. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
88% Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. No. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 26, 1904. 
Shipping dull; prospects fair. 

Wm. Goiil, Agent. 
N.E. cor. F and Heron sts. P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Sept. 26, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; prospects 
poor. 

D. W. Paul, Agent. 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood No. 352. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 25, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

J. W. Ericksen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 327. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 26, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects medium. 

H. Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 178. 



Situation quiet. 



Honolulu Agency', Sept. 19, 1904. 



F. Larsen, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' 
ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 29, 1904. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 8 
]>. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. A Quarterly Fi- 
nance Committee was elected. Shipwreck Benefit was 
ordered to be paid to the following three members: 
Edwin Berry, wrecked on the schooner Mary D. 
Hume; James John and G. H. Bagley, wrecked on 
the steamer City of Topeka. Nomination of dele- 
gates to the coming convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America was proceeded with. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 

54 Mission st. 

Seattle Agency, Sept. 23, 1904. 
Shipping on steamers good; sailing vessels quiet. 

R. Powers, Agent. 

San Pedro Agency, Sept. 23, 1904. 
Shipping good; prospects good. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
COAST AND ALASKA. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 30, 1904. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 8 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. A Quarterly Fi- 
nance Committee was elected. The following were 
elected on the Committee of Arrangements for the 
International Sea men's Union of America conven- 
tion: H. Goransen, I. N. Hylen and Andrew Brandt. 
The next regular meeting will be held next Friday, 
October 7, at 7:30 p. m. All members are requested 
to be present, as business of great importance will be 
t ransacted. 

I. N. Hylen, Secretary. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Sept. 20, loot. 
Shipping slow during the week; main nun ashore. 
The following were elected delegates 1" the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America convention; W. 
Curry, W. H. Jenkins. L. S. Pitzpatrick and George 
Hansen. 

Wm. Penje, Secretary. 

Tonawanda (N. Y. ) Agency, Sept. 26, 1901. 
Shipping slack. 

Thomas Lester, Agent. 
152 Main st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Coast Seamen's 
Journal 



Published Weekly by 
THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR. . . Editor | P. SCHARRENBERQ, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall, - $2.00 | Six months, - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday noon 
of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should address 
all communications of a business nature to the Business 
Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second-class 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, south- 
west corner East and Mission streets, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the Journal provided they are of general interest, 
brief, legible, written on one side only of the paper, and 
accompanied by the writer's name and address. The 
Journal is not responsible for the expressions of cor- 
respondents, nor for the return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1904. 



CALL FOR SEAMEN'S CONVENTION. 



The call for the ninth annual convention 
of the International Seamen's Union of 
America has been issued by Secretary-Treas- 
urer Frazicr, as follows: 

International Seamen's Union of America, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, .Mass. 

Boston, Mass., September 22, 1904. 
To Affiliated Unions, Greeting — Pursuant to our 
Constitution, you are hereby notified that the Ninth 
Annual Convention of the International Seamen's 
Union of America will be held in San Francisco, Cal., 
beginning Monday morning, December 5, 1904, at 10 
a. m., and continuing from day to day until the 
business of the convention shall have been completed. 
The basis of representation shall be one delegate 
for 200 or more; three delegates for 500 or more, 
and one delegate for each additional 500 or majority 
fraction thereof, based on per capita tax paid. 

Delegates to be elected in same manner as officers 
of organization represented. 

All affiliated organizations to send at least one 
delegate. 

No reduction in railroad rates from the East can 
be secured. Union men do not patronize the Santa 
Fe system. Fraternally, 

WM. H. FRAZIER, 
Secretary-Treasurer, International Seamen's 
Union of America. 

The situation, present and prospective, in 
the shipping and industrial world demands 
the serious attention of the organized sea- 
men. In order that the convention may be 
enabled to transact its business in the most 
comprehensive manner and devise the most 
effective measures for future execution, it is 
necessary that the largest and widest repre- 
sentation be had. Every District and every 
part of each District should be represented 
by the most intelligent members available 
for selection. The safeguarding of the gains 
already made, the formulating of plans for 
future progress, the strengthening of the 
bonds that now exist between the seamen of 
different classes and localities, and the ex- 
tension of organization so as to embrace 
those classes and localities which still remain 
outside of the pah? — these objects demand 
consideration and action by the forthcoming 
convention. The San Francisco gathering 



will doubtless excel its predecessors in point 
of numbers ; it is to be hoped that it will also 
mark an advance in the amount and character 
of the work done. 



"AS THEY DO IN GERMANY." 



The article on "The German Trade-Un- 
ions," published in this issue, is a carefully 
prepared summary of the subject, taken from 
official publications. The reader will find 
it a thoroughly reliable, as well as highly 
interesting presentation of trade-union condi- 
tions among the German workers. 

The primary object of the article, i. e., to 
correct the misstatements circulated in nu- 
merous xlmerican publications concerning 
the relations existing between trade-unionism 
and politics in Germany, is of value, not only 
in the interest of the wider diffusion of 
knowledge on the labor movement, but also, 
and more immediately, as bearing upon a 
common form of agitation among the organ- 
ized workers of the United States. The polit- 
ical-actionist in the ranks of American trade- 
unionism is wont to refer with much assur- 
ance to the action of "our fellow-workers in 
(lorniany," in Great Britain, in Australia, 
and elsewhere- The force of this plea de- 
pends entirely upon the ignorance of those to 
whom it is addressed. The man who urges 
American trade-unionists to do "as they do 
in Germany" has perfect confidence in the 
ignorance of his hearers, a confidence which, 
unfortunately, is but too well justified. The 
political-actionist himself may, or may not, 
know the facts; but, in any event, he knows 
that his audience can not find him out ex- 
cept by going to Germany or other distant 
land for the evidence. Of such is the "prop- 
aganda of progress!" 

The Journal writer has gone to Germany 
for the facts adduced in the present article. 
That is to say, the writer of the article has 
gone to official German sources for his in- 
formation. The result is suggestive, in fact, 
demonstrative, of conditions the opposite of 
those assumed and asserted by the political- 
actionist. The article shows that "political 
action," as understood and recommended by 
the progressive ( ?) spirits in the American 
labor movement, does not exist in Germany, 
but that, on the contrary, the separation of 
politics and trade-unionism has been found 
expedient for organizing purposes "because 
organizations which are formed for the strug- 
gle for higher wages should include all work- 
ers, and keep out none on account of political 
differences." These are the words of Secre- 
tary Legien, of the National Federation of 
Free Trade-Unions, who is probably the 
highest authority on the subject in Germany. 
It will be noted that these views exactly ex- 
press the position of American trade-union- 
ists. The fact that the members of the Na- 
tional Federation generally support the So- 
cial Democratic party is accounted for, not 
on the ground of any affiliation between the 
trade-unions and that party, but because the 
latter is the "only political party which may 
be justly called a workingmen's party," and 
because that party is "ever ready to work 
and vote for trade-union legislation." Here 
again we note the similarity between the 
methods of German -and American trade- 



unionists ; both vote as a rule for a certain 
party, not for party reasons, but because it 
best represents their interests. Indeed, tak- 
ing the Journal article as a whole, its most 
impressive feature is the proof it affords of 
the fact that as between the proposed politic- 
al action and the present purely economic 
policy of American trade-unionism, the lat- 
ter, rather than the former, most closely con- 
forms to the facts of the German labor move- 
ment. 

Inquiries recently made by the Journal 
from authorities on the labor movement in 
other countries have produced results simi- 
lar to those herewith presented in the case 
of the labor movement in Germany. These 
results will be published shortly. For the 
present it may simply be said that all the 
facts point to a similarity in the methods of 
the organized workers of all countries. This 
fact is natural and inevitable, considering 
that the labor movement in all countries rests 
upon the same foundation, namely, craft in- 
stinct, craft interest and craft organization. 
The unnatural feature of the case is that 
men presuming to be leaders of their fellows 
should attempt to lead the labor movement 
away from its bedrock. The successes of the 
labor movement in Germany and other coun- 
tries, as in the United States, is due to the 
purely economic character of its organization 
and methods. It is only by such organization 
and such methods that success is possible, 
since it is only by these that the workers of 
the world can be held together for common 
defense. 



SAVING AT THE SPIGOT. 



The Honorable the Secretary of the Navy, Washing- 
ton, D. C: 
The Navy collier Saturn is looking for a crew 
below the regular rate of wages and the rate paid 
for like services in the Transport Service. The sea- 
men on this Coast appeal to you not to permit the 
Government to be used to reduce wages. Regula» 
coastwise rates are $40 per month, and overtime 
pay; Transport rate, $35 per month. 
Respectfully yours, 

A. FURUSETH, 
Secretary, Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

The foregoing telegram was sent to Wash- 
ington on September 29 as the result of the 
effort being made by those in charge of the 
Saturn, now at San Francisco, to secure a 
crew at wages far be-low the going rates of 
the port. No reply has yet been received, 
and possibly none will be. Possibly the offi- 
cials of the Navy Department feel secure in 
the reflection that the saving made in the 
shipment of seamen at $25 per month, instead 
of $40, the going rate — a saving of $15 on 
each man, it will be noted — may help to re- 
deem the Administration from the charge 
of extravagance now so freely made against 
it. Possibly ; yet, on the other hand, it is 
possible that the public may regard the item 
contemplated in the case of the Saturn's 
crew as rather inconsiderable, as compared 
with the total of Government expenditures, 
now over $604,000,000 annually. . 

The whole proceeding looks like saving at 
the spigot and wasting at the bung — a very 
small spigot and a very large bung, at that. 
The Government could very well afford to 
pay decent wages to its seamen (and surely 
no one will say that $40 per month is unrea- 
sonable for the class of work required of the 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



crew of a vessel in the Saturn's class) with- 
out incurring any criticism on the ground 
of profligacy. As a matter of fact, to ad- 
here to the $25 rate of wages is simply to 
waste that much money, for the reason that 
good seamen, seamen worth their salt, are 
not to be had at that figure. True economy, 
to say nothing of the dignity of the Navy 
Department, demands that the hunt for cheap 
labor for the Saturn be discontinued and 
that the officers of that vessel be directed to 
offer a rate of wages sufficiently high to in- 
sure the services of the best seamen now in 
port. 

THE SLOCUM'S CREW. 

The Local Inspectors of Steam Vessels at 
New York, reporting the result of their in- 
quiry into the burning of the steamer Gen- 
eral Slocum, say: 

If the General Slocum had been supplied with 
double the quantity of life-saving equipment on board 
that she did have, with a crew as incompetent as the 
crew of the steamer proved to be, not a single life 
more would have been saved than was saved. 

At first blush this strikes one as a remark- 
able statement. Yet, upon reflection that 
statement will be found to express a very 
large and significant truth, namely, that in 
the last analysis it is seamanship that counts 
in the saving of life at sea. The value, and 
even the necessity, of proper life-saving 
equipment is not to be gainsaid ; but it should 
be understood that such equipment is at best 
only an aid to seamanship, that it can never 
be regarded as a substitute for the latter. The 
press and public, while condemning the rot- 
ten life-preservers and the slightly decayed 
Local Inspectors, must bear in mind the fact 
that, even with industry, intelligence and 
honesty in the matter of material equipment, 
there would still remain a serious menace 
to life on the average passenger and excur- 
sion steamer. Accidents will happen on the 
best regulated steamers. As a means of min- 
imizing the results of accident there is but 
one certain measure, i. e., the employment 
of competent seamen. The demand of press 
and public in the present circumstances 
should be for a provision of law requiring 
that the crews of all passenger craft shall 
be composed of practical seamen. Unless 
this demand be made and complied with, the 
Slocum tragedy is certain to be repeated 
sooner or later. In which event the epitaph 
of the Slocum's unidentified dead will be 
proved false, a thing to be cited as an ex- 
ample of the lengths to which snuffle can go 
without meaning anything. 



The American Federation of Labor has 
issued an appeal for financial aid on behalf 
of the textile workers of Fall River, Mass., 
who have been on strike for the past ten 
weeks against a reduction of 12^ per cent in 
wages, the second cut since November last. 
This appeal is an especially worthy one and 
should be responded to promptly and gener- 
ously by the tradeMmions of the country. 
Contributions should be forwarded to Albert 
Hibbert, Secretary, United Textile Workers 
of America, Box 713, Fall River, Mass. 



Demand the union label on all purchases! 



DEMAND THIS UNION LABEL! 




*« 



This is the label of the United Garment 
Workers of America. By demanding this 
label when purchasing overalls, oilskins, 
shirts and the lower-priced class of suits, the 
purchaser is assured that he or she is get- 
ting an article made under healthful and 
decent conditions; also that the men and 
women employed in the making of the arti- 
cle have received a fair wage for their labor. 

Articles of the kind here named which do 
not bear the label of the Garment Workers 
are made for the greater part by Chinese. 
But whether made by Chinese or white labor, 
the non-labeled article represents unorgan- 
ized labor, and is, therefore, not entitled to 
the support of trade-unionists. The Gar- 
ment Workers are struggling to improve 
the conditions of their employment. To 
accomplish this object, and to maintain the 
advantages secured, organization is an ab- 
solute necessity, more so, perhaps, in this 
particular trade than in many others by rea- 
son of the great predominance of female 
workers employed in that trade. Certain 
employers of non-union white labor in San 
Francisco make the claim that so long as 
they pay the union rate of wages they 
should not be discriminated against. Every 
trade-unionist, however, recognizes in this 
claim merely a subterfuge to forestall or- 
ganization and by this means to keep labor 
in a state of constant fear and subjection. 
The union label, being the symbol of organi- 
zation, is the only guarantee against a re- 
duction of wages at the pleasure or whim of 
the employer. 

Readers of the Journal, especially mem- 
bers of the Sailors' Union, are particularly 
urged to demand the Garment Workers' 
label when making purchases, of wearing ap- 
parel. The following brands are manu- 
factured in San Francisco and bear the 
label: 

Overalls — "Boss of the Road" and 
"Can't Bust 'Em." 

Shirts — Rising Star, Standard and Ea- 
gleson & Co. 

Brands of union goods made in the East 
may also be had. Whether made in the East 
or in the West, the presence of the label is 
the only guarantee that the goods are union 
made. Goods that do not bear the label are 
non-union, whether made by Chinese or 
white labor. All trade-unionists should de- 
mand the label of the Garment Workers, thus 
helping the men and women of our own kind 
in their struggle to uphold our common prin- 
ciples, as against those classes of labor which, 
whether yellow or white, constitute a stand- 
ing menace to trade-unionism and all that 
that institution stands for. 



The trade-union that "comes out" for this 
or that political party may boast of its pro- 
gressiveness, but in its sober moments it must 
admit that its gains in wages, hours, etc., 
are made by trade-union methods — not by 
political methods, but in spite of them. 



WAGES AND PRICES. 



A favorite argument, or rather dictum, 
of those who insist that the trade-unions 
should abandon the substance of higher 
wages, shorter hours, etc., for the shadow 
of the "co-operative commonwealth" is that 
prices increase coincidently with wages, and 
in the same or even greater proportion. The 
moral of this contention is, of course, quite 
plain. Don't fight for higher wages; let 
them stand at the present figure ; if a reduc- 
tion be threatened, don't resist, since as 
wages go down prices will follow, and the 
workers will be quite as well off in the end! 
This isn't Parryism, although it might easi- 
ly be mistaken for such. On the contrary, 
it is good, sound Socialist logic, as expound- 
ed by the leaders of that cult. It all goes 
to show that, after all, the gulf between 
the Socialist and his hated adversary, the 
Capitalist, is a very narrow one, so narrow, 
indeed, that many persons seem to be able 
to stand on both sides of it at one and the 
same time. 

On this subject the Cigarmakers' Jour- 
nal has the following to say: 

About a year ago Mr. Max S. Hayes sent to the 
Cleveland Citizen a letter for publication, bearing 
his own signature, which contains the following: 

The Cigar Trust has established stores throughout 
the city of New York, and is driving the independents 
out of business, the restaurants are passing into the 
control of a few large concerns, the apartment houses 
are being gobbled up by a few large firms, the gro- 
cery stores are being absorbed by a few men, the 
tailoring trade is to be controlled in the same man- 
ner, as well as other businesses. So where wages are 
forced up 10 per cent or so by hard fighting, the 
living expenses are quickly increased and the workers 
are no better off. 

The bold assertion of Mr. Hayes that an increase 
of wages amounting to 10 per cent does not benefit 
labor, because by some automatic method the cost of 
living is raised in proportion, is not borne out by 
facts. Like most philosophers and doctrinaires, Mr. 
Hayes does not bother his brains with facts, neither 
does he care to investigate. If the fallacious asser- 
tions of Mr. Hayes were true, then the wage-worker 
would be as well off under low wages as under high 
wages, owing to the automatic rise and fall of 
prices. 

Our contemporary proceeds to quote nu- 
merous instances in which wages have been 
materially increased without any correspond- 
ing increase in prices, and even with a de- 
crease in the latter respect in some cases. 
These facts will, we fear, be wasted upon 
the propagandists of the stationary wage 
theory. The latter do not want facts ; fancy 
is all that is needed in their business. In- 
telligent men know that while prices may 
rise with wages, they do so only to a certain 
point; that when that point is reached the 
continued increase of wages represents so 
much drawn from surplus profits, thus re- 
turning to the producer so much more of the 
"product of his toil." The Socialist dictum 
of the stationary relation between wages and 
prices is merely a revivification of the old 
doctrine of the Wage Fund. The adoption 
by our very, very progressive friends and 
mentors of an old and exploded idea, dished 
up in new and explosive language, is an- 
other illustration of the fact that most of 
the so-called radical reform of to-day is mere- 
ly old error clothed in new terms. 



Do your shopping early, and help the Re- 
tail Clerks in maintaining the early-closing 
rule. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






************* 




A*************' 



On the Great Lakes. 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Union*.) 



^t««*f«tf«T«**T«tffttmfrmtrf«vTfTtf*«mr*«rttTfft 




i 

§ 



Chronometers on Ice. 



One hundred ship's chronometers kepi in 
cold storage is one of the many remarkable 
things to be seen at the United States Naval 
Observatory at Washington. To the layman 
ir would appear that the authorities were 
apprehensive thai the timepieces would 
"spoil." One inure experienced would reason 
that the process had something to do with 
regulating their time keeping qualities. 
Neither surmise is correct. The fact of the 
matter is the chronometers are allowed t" 
go ticking merrily on in their own way ami 
time. N6 <me hurries them, and no one tries 
to diminish their speed. 

Yet so important is absolutely correct time 
on shipboard that a difference of four sec- 
onds means a mile in longitude or latitude. 
And a mile in Longitude may mean a war- 
ship on the rocks. 

While no one corrects the •'running'" of 
these chronometers, a most accurate record 
is kept of their manner of "running" under 
different temperatures. This is why they 
are kept on ice. The regular annual chro- 
nometer trial begins on January 2 and ends 
June 22, and during this period there is 
scarcely a minute of the day that the time- 
keepers are not under the closest observa- 
tion of experts who can tell their variations 
to a hair's breadth, all of which are carefully 
noted on a record, ami, at the completion of 
ihe test, handed to the commander of the 
vessel to which the instrument belongs. 

The temperature varies at different times 
of flie test from 50 to 90 degrees and the 
losing or gaining qualities of the chronome- 
ters under these conditions are accurately 
kept. Thus, with a chart expressing in 
curves just what he may expect from his 
chronometer under differenl conditions of 
climate, and, with his thermometer and ba- 
rometer close at hand, the sailing master may 
calculate to a nicety the correct time and get 
his location to a certainty. 

The importance of a central station where 
navy chronometers and other navigating in- 
struments may he standardized is not ap- 
preciated outside of those directly interested, 
despite the fact that millions of dollars and 
thousands of lives are wholly dependent on 
the efficiency of the service in this line of 
work. It is essentially necessary that chro- 

nometers should he regulated by a conn i 

standard, and, in order that this may Ik: done 
successfully, the same person who transmits 
all over the country the standard time should 
have charge of them. 

In other countries there are several naval 
observatories that do the work which the 
Washington Observatory is practically doing 
alone. In France there is a great central 
observatory at Paris, with branch naval ob- 
servatories at Toulon, Lorient, Cherbourg 
and Rochefort. The same method of divid- 
ing the work is adopted in other countries. 

The policy of the United States, however, 

combine all the energies and talent at 

the central observatory. In the temperature 



loom of this observatory, for instance, be- 
tween $40,000 and $50,000 worth of chro- 
nometers are tested during six months each 
year, and many others all the year round. 
The tests dvo made by the most experienced 
men in the Government service, and the room 
was constructed after years of study and ex- 
perience. There are a transit-house and a 
clockroom, which are considered the finest 
in the world. To establish duplicates of 
these arrangements in four or five different 
points along the coast would nearly quad- 
ruple the first cost of the plants, with a pro- 
portional increase for maintenance, and at 
the same time would abolish that exact com- 
parative test and standardizing of instru- 
ments which is to-day one of the stroll 
points of the present system in this country. 

It is recognized, however, that the great 
area covered by the United States is too vast 
a field to be attended to exclusively at one 
point. A small naval observatory has, there- 
fore, been constructed at Mare Island, Cali- 
fornia, from which the naval vessels in the 
Pacific receive their supplies of navigating 
instruments — all of which are first standard- 
ized at "Washington — and receive the correct 
time. It is probable that before long another 
sub-observatory will be established at Tu- 
tuila, Samoa, to facilitate the work of navi- 
gators. 

The test of chronometers is based on pure- 
ly scientific principles. The temperature 
room is constructed so carefully that the 
thermometer does not vary one-half of a de- 
gree in a week. The room is twenty feet 
long by ten feet wide and eight feet high. 
It has double walls, quadruple windows, and 
warm water pipes surround it. Below it is 
a big refrigerator holding 3000 pounds of 
ice. A perfectly adjusted thermograph keeps 
a record of the temperature. If it becomes 
too warm the expansion of metal on a deli- 
cate instrument serves to turn down the gas 
heating the water in the pipes surrounding 
the room, thus giving scope for the action 
of the cold storage plant. If, on the other 
hand, it becomes too cool, the metal con- 
tracts, and the gas is turned higher, heating 
the water and raising the temperature. In 
this way the temperature of the room is kept 
at any degree desired automatically. 

As already mentioned, the time of the 
chronometers is never changed here. Some- 
times a chronometer is allowed to run for 
four years without the slightest alteration 
being made in its time keeping qualities. 
Sometimes it is fast and sometimes slow ac- 
cording to standard time, yet the sailing 
master knows the exact time. This he calcu- 
lates from the "curve table," furnished to 
him by the Naval Observatory. The man- 
ner of making these tests forms one of the 
most interesting studies at the observatory. 
The work is exceedingly technical, and in 
no department of the Government service is 
more scientific knowledge and experience re- 
quired than here. — Brooklyn Eagle. 



«tfTTf«fMTTfTfTTTtTT««Vf«f<l 

Custer's Last Stand. 



The Indians attacked at once. Hiding at 
full gallop along the front of the line on their 
ponies, they poured a heavy fire from their 
long-range rifles upon the soldiers, to which 
the latter made a brave, steady, but not very 
effective reply with their inferior carbines. 

Ihe force menacing them was so great that 
( luster dared not leave his position on the 
hills. To retreat was hopeless, to advance 
impossible. They must stand on the defen- 
sive and pray that the advance of Reno's 
command up the valley, which they prob- 
ably hoped that Benteen would reinforce, 
would compel the withdrawal of the Indians 
from their front. They fought on, there- 
fore, coolly and resolutely, husbanding their 
ammunition and endeavoring to make every 
shot tell on their galloping, yelling foemen. 
The Indians, in their accounts, speak of the 
cool, deliberate courage of numbers of the 
officers and men, whom they singled out for 
their bravery. Yet the troopers suffered 
great loss as the afternoon wore on. Their 
ammunition began to run low, and the con- 
tracting, whirling circle of Indians drove 
them closer and closer together. The horses 
were at last stampeded, and with them went 
some of the reserve ammunition. 

It appears that at this time Custer must 
have endeavored to send a message to Reno, 
lor the body of a solitary soldier, Sergeant 
Butler, was found after the battle at a point 
half way between Custer and Reno's com- 
mand. A little heap of cartridge shells lay 
near his body, evidencing that he had sold 
his life dearly. 

It was evident to all on the hill as the aft- 
ernoon drew to its close that they were 
doomed. It was hardly possible that a coun- 
ter attack by Reno would save them now, and 
there were no evidences that he was any- 
where in the vicinity. ''Where in God's 
name," they must have asked themselves in 
their despair, "could Reno be?" 

One of the Crow scouts has said — although 
his account is generally disbelieved — that he 
went at last to Custer, as yet unharmed, and 
told him that he thought he could get him 
away, and that Custer refused to leave the 
field. The Crow altered his appearance to 
look as much like a Sioux as possible, and 
in the confusion of the fight got away safely. 
lie was the only human survivor of the field. 
What occurred after is a matter of conjec- 
ture, based upon the contradictory and in- 
adequate testimony of the Indians them- 
selves. — Cyrus Townsend Brady, in Pear- 
son's. 



1 )emand the union label on all purchases! 



New statutes, just issued in Russia, place 
women doctors on practically the same foot- 
ing both with regard to education and prac- 
tice as their male rivals. Women may now 
obtain diplomas, pursuing their studies for 
medical degrees in the universities of the 
country and in the Military Medical Acad- 
eiuv. Put the law restricts Jewish students 
to 3 per cent. 



^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOTJENAL. 



Rail-way Accidents. 



The statement of accidents to persons in 
the summaries in the statistical report of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission are pre- 
sented under the two general classes of acci- 
dents resulting from the movement of trains, 
locomotives or cars, and of accidents arising 
from causes other than those resulting from 
the movement of trains, locomotives or cars. 
These classes include all the casualties re- 
turned hy the carriers in their annual reports 
to the Commission, whether sustained hy pas- 
sengers, employes, trespassers or other per- 
sons, and for a number of reasons they are 
not in all respects comparable with others 
in the bulletins that are based on monthly 
reports. 

The total number of casualties to persons 
on the railways for the year ending June 30, 
1903, was 86,393, of which 9,840 represented 
the number of persons killed and 76,553 the 
number injured. Casualties occurred among 
three general classes of railway employes, as 
follows: Trainmen, 2,070 killed and 25,- 
676 injured ; switch tenders, crossing tenders 
and watchmen, 283 killed, 2,352 injured; 
other employes, 1,253 killed, 32,453 injured. 
The casualties to employes coupling and un- 
coupling cars were: Employes killed, 281; 
injured, 3,551. For the year 1902 the cor- 
responding figures were: Killed, 167; in- 
jured, 2,864. The casualties connected with 
coupling and uncoupling cars are assigned as 
follows: Trainmen killed, 211; injured, 
3,023 ; switch tenders, crossing tenders and 
watchmen killed, 57 ; injured, 416 ; other em- 
ployes killed, 13; injured, 112. 

The casualties due to falling from trains, 
locomotives or cars in motion were : Train- 
men killed, 440 ; injured, 4,191 ; switch Lend- 
ers, crossing tenders and watchmen killed, 
39 ; injured, 461 ; other employes killed, 72 ; 
injured, 536. The casualties due to jumping 
en or off trains, locomotives or cars in mo- 
tion were: Trainmen killed, 101: injured, 
3,133; switch tenders, crossing tenders and 
watchmen killed, 15 ; injured, 279 ; other em- 
ployes killed, 82 ; injured, 508. The casual- 
ties to the same three classes of employes in 
consequence of collisions and derailments 
were: Trainmen killed, 648; injured, 
4,526 ; switch tenders, crossing tenders and 
watchmen killed, 17 ; injured, 137 ; other em- 
ployes killed, 128; injured, 743. 

The number of passengers killed in the 
course of the year 1903 was 355, and the 
number injured 8,231. In the previous year 
345 passengers were killed and'6,683 injured. 
There were 173 passengers killed and 4,584 
injured because of collisions and derailments. 
The total number of persons, other than em- 
ployes and passengers, killed was 5,879 ; in- 
jured, 7,841. These figures include the cas- 
ualties to persons classed as trespassing, of 
whom 5,000 were killed and 5,079 were in- 
jured. The total number of casualties to per- 
sons other than employes from being struck 
by trains, locomotives or cars were 4,534 
killed and 4,029 injured. The casualties of 
this class were as follows : At highway cross- 
ings, passengers killed, 3; injured, 7; other 
persons killed, 895; injured, 1,474; at sta- 
tions, passengers killed, 24; injured, 108; 
other persons killed, 390 ; injured, 501 ; at 



Women as Mariners. 



In some coast villages among the Danes, 
Norwegians and Einns women are employed 
as sailors, and prove themselves to be expert 
mariners. In the smaller sailing ships, 
where there is a woman on board, whether 
she be the wife of the skipper or the steward- 
ess, she is expected to take her turn at the 
ordinary work of the sailor, not even exclud- 
ing the duties of the man at the wheel or of 
the night watch. Denmark employs several 
women as State officials at sea. Experienced 
captains assert that the women make excel- 
lent sailors, and are equal to most seamen in 
dexterity and power of endurance. — London 
World. 



Artificial eyes were first used by the 
Egyptians long before the Christian era. 
Mummies have been found with artificial 
optics. They were fashioned of gold/ silver, 
copper or ivory. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of Ameriea) 

121 and 123 North Desplalnes Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone 1321 Monroe. 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS 
CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH. CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF STATIONS 



Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Esoanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis 
Toledo, O. 



other points along track, passengers killed, 
8; injured, 14; other persons killed, 3,214; 
injured, 1,925. The ratios of casualties in- 
dicate that one employe in every 364 was 
killed, and one employe in every 22 was in- 
jured. With regard to trainmen — that is, 
enginemen, firemen, conductors and other 
trainmen — it appears that one trainman was 
killed for every 123 employed, and one was 
injured for every 10 employed. 

One passenger was killed for every 1,957,- 
441 carried, and one injured for every 84,424 
carried. With respect to the number of miles 
traveled, however, the figures show that 58,- 
917,645 passenger miles were accomplished 
for each passenger killed, and 2,541,096 pas- 
senger miles for each passenger injured. 



"We Don't Patronize. 



BRANCHES 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 138 Ninety-second Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South 

BUFFALO, N. Y 73 Main Street 

Telephone 1465 Seneca 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Cuyahoga C 2130 

TOLEDO, 606 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

AGENCIES 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge St. East 

Telephone Zenith 1373 
BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

SUB-AGENCIES 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SANDUSKY, 639 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N Y 94 Hamilton Street 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis. Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, of New York City; Kerbs,. 
Wertheim & Schiffer, of New York City; The 
Henry George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby, Milling Company, Min- 
neapolis, Minn.; Kelley Milling Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Pipes — Win. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y.; Straw- 
bridge & Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner 
Bros., New York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Com- 
pany, Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, 
N. Y.; Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N Y.; James 
R. Kaiser, New York City. 

Shoes — Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; 
Thomas Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass.; Hamey 
Bros., Lynn, Mass. 

Mfa 



Company, Middletown, 



Suspenders — Russell 
Conn. 

Textile— Merrimac Manufacturing Company (print- 
ed goods), Lowell, Mass. 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica, N. Y. 

Woolens — Hartford Carpet Company, Thompson- 
ville, Conn.; J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Company, Chicago, 111. 

Xewspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co.. printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Company, publishers, 
Hammond, Ind.; Gazette, Terra Haute, Ind.; 
Times, Los Angeles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS AND STONE. 
Pottery and Brick — J. B. Owens Pottery Company, 
of Zanesville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta 
Company, of Chicago, 111.; Terra Haute Brick and 
Pipe Company, of Terra Haute. Ind.; Evans & 
Howard Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick Company, St. 
Louis, Mo.; C. W. Stine Pottery Company, White 
Cottage, Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Com- 
pany, Pittsburg, Pa. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co.. 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury 
Mass.; Carr, Prescott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark. Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Davis Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, Dayton, Ohio: Computing Scale 
Company, Dayton. Ohio; Iver Johnson Arms Com- 
pany, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Company, 
Syracuse, N. Y.; Brown & Sharpe Tool Company, 
Providence, R. I.: John Russell Cutlery Company, 
Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas TacK Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass.; Hohmann & Maurer Manufacturing 
Company, Rochester, N. Y.; Henry Disston & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Ni- 
agara Falls, N Y.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont. ; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, 
Ohio; Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H.; 
American Circular Loom Company. New Orange, 
N. J.; Payne Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y.; Lin- 
coln Iron Works, Rutland, Vt. ; F. R. Patch Manu- 
facturing Company, Rutland, Vt.; Art Metal Con- 
struction Company, Jamestown, N. Y.; Erie City 
Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David Maydole Hammei 
Company. Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, Elizabeth. N. J. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Meskir, Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stove. Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa. 



Terre Haute 



STREET RAILWAYS. 
-Street Railway Company. 



WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis. Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, 
Circleville. Ohio. 

Carriages — Crane. Breed & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cooperage — Cincinnati Cooperage Company, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; Northwestern Cooperage and Lum- 
ber Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye 
Stave Company), of Ohio, Michigan and Wiscon- 
sin; Elgin Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Wil- 
liams Cooperage Company and Palmer Manufac- 
turing Company, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; Ballard & 
Ballard Milling Company, Louisville, Ky. 

China — Wick China Company, Kittanning, Pa. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, 
Ga.; O. Wlsner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
Krell Piano> Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Druck- 
er & Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table 
Company, St. Johns, Mich. 

Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York. N. Y.; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, HI.; George Reeves, 
Cape May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Henry Ayres, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon. Baltimore, 
Md.; Huttig Sash and Door Company, St. Louis, 
Mo.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg. Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co.; Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus 
Buggy and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; 
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; 
Diamond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Pens — L. E. Waterman & Co., New York City. 

Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co.. Batavia, N. Y.; 
J. N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis. 111. 

Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, 
Hartford. Conn. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Company, Nor- 
folk, N. Y. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phil- 
adelphia, Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany: Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 



I 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



( Continued from page 3. ) 



cruise of four months and a half, complain 
of the poor quality and insufficiency of the 
food during the voyage. They also report that 
the latest arrivals among the boys — nick- 
named "new mugs" — were hazed and terror- 
ized in a shameful and brutal manner by the 
boys — known as "old mugs" — who had made 
a previous voyage in the vessel, and that this 
thing was winked at by the officers. Edward 
Westcott, of Brooklyn, one of the younger 
lads, well educated and a fine freehand ]>en- 
cil sk etcher, was driven by his tormentors to 
commit suicide by jumping overboard while 
the vessel was on her way from Southampton 
to Lisbon. One boy ran away in Southamp- 
ton and was forwarded by the American Con- 
sul to Lisbon, there to rejoin the vessel. 
Three boys ran away in Lisbon, but were all 
recaptured, and their lot on board after that 
was made harder than ever. The crew at- 
tribute the whole trouble to a marked lack 
of discipline on board, claiming that the offi- 
cers seemed afraid of the ruffianly gang of 
"old mugs." 



Fag Ends. 

"Knowledge is power," but money has the 
call nowadays when it comes to a choice be- 
tween the two. 

Man lives to work no less than he works 
to live. Habitual idleness leads to decay of 
mind and body. 

Don't look for trouble; look out for it. "A 
mackerel sky and mares' tails make lofty 
ships carry low sails." 



Scientific essays on poverty find few read- 
ers among the poor. A drowning man is not 
at all interested in finding out how he got 
into the water. 



Organization and union of forces means 
conservation of strength and survival; selfish 
individualism leads to disintegration and 
ultimate extinction. 



The law of supply and demand is not with- 
out exceptions. Under our industrial system, 
for instance, the supply of scabs is far from 
equal to the demand, and yet who so cheap as 
a scab ? 



"A rolling stone gathers no moss," and 
"home-keeping youths have ever homely 
wits." These two aphorisms, when contrast- 
ed, form one more proof of the truth that 
the happy medium in everything is best. 

The "spoils system" is all right, provided 
the spoils have been legitimately won. "To 
the victor belongs the spoils." The trade- 
union which has spent time, energy and 
money in bettering the conditions of labor 
has a perfect right to insist that its own 
members shall be the first beneficiaries of the 
improved conditions. 

A trade-union which denies the just claims 
of one of its members is far more contempti- 
ble than the corporation which denies the 
just claims of one of its employes. Blood is 
thicker than water, and the obligations of a 



trade-union to its individual members arc as 
much more binding than those of a cor] "'ra- 
tion to its employes as are our duties to our 
friends above our duties to strangers. 



The gregarious instinct of man is one of 
the most powerful of all the agencies that 
work for progress and civilization. This in- 
stinct is violated by the scab, and scabbing, 
therefore, carries with it its own punishment, 
the punishment that always follows the 
stifling of a natural instinct. This explains 
why tin 1 scab is despised even by those who 
profit from his selfishness. The very beasts 
of the field spurn those of their kind who 
Avill not herd with them. 



Professor Metchnikoffs latest discovery 
thai sour milk is the long-sought "elixir of 
life" which will enable us all to live as long 
ns Methuselah, will go far toward convinc 
ing the average man that common sense is 
nol necessarily a part of the mental equip- 
ment of n very learned man. It would seem 
from this and other instances of like kind 
which might easily be quoted that Hie law of 
mechanics, "what is gained in power is lost 
in speed," and vice versa, has its counterpart 
in the workings of the human mind. 



Treatment of Consumption. 



Professor Jacob, first physician of the hos- 
pital "Charite," of Berlin, lectured a few- 
days ago before the Berlin Society for In- 
ternal Medicine on a new mode of treatment 
of consumption of the lungs originated by 
him. 

Professor Jacob started with the presump- 
tion that the remedies usually employed do 
not reach the location of the disease at all, 
and he therefore conceived the idea of intro- 
ducing medicaments directly into the lungs. 
Through numerous experiments on animals 
he became convinced that such injections are 
very well borne by animals. The manipula- 
tion is. very simple and can be undertaken 
by every physician who is familiar with the 
use of the throat mirror (Kehlkopf spiegel). 
After the Trachea and larnyx have been made 
insensible by cocaine or anesthesine, a thin 
rubber tube is introduced into the lungs and 
the medicine is injected through it. The 
whole process occupies hardly ten minutes. 

Professor Jacob has found that the most 
efficient remedy is the well-known "tuber- 
culine" which Professor Koch used thirteen 
years ago; next in efficiency is creosote. He 
succeeded in this way in making the tubercu- 
losis bacilli disappear completely in from 
four to eight weeks. So far he has treated 
only five patients by his method, though he 
expects its general adoption. He added that 
through this new method a safe diagnosis 
can he made of consumption of the lungs, 
while this has so far not been possible. Here- 
tofore tuberculine was injected hypodermic- 
ally to demonstrate whether a person suffered 
from tuberculosis; yet even if the reaction 
was positive, nothing was known about the 
seat of the tuberculosis. Now only his new 
method of "lung infusion," as he calls it, 
needs to be employed to determine whether 
t uherculosis of the lungs exists. It is reported 
that the lecture was received with great ap- 
plause. 



International Seamen's Union ot America. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OK LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretsir> -Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St.. Boston. Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarteni 

BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BANGOR, ME., 44 Union St. 
PORTLAND. ME.. 377A Fore St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I., 464 South Main St. 
MOW YORK, N. Y., 37 South St. 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 68 West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA.. Southeast corner Second 
'.nd Lombard St.«. 

.f I MORE, MD„ 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK. VA.. 52 Campbells Wharf. 
NEW BEDFORD, .MASS., 7 South Water St. 
MOBILE, ALA.. 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA.. 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 
Branches : 

NEW YORK CITY, 51-52 South St. 
BOSTON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 1800 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA., corner Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE. ALA., 104 South Commerce St. 
GALVESTON, TEX.. 20 Strand St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., 223 Commercial St. 
Branch: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 21 Old Slip. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branches: 
GLOUCESTER. MASS., 141% Main St. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 129 Twenty-third St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 



WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S I MON. 
Ileudqunrters: 

CHICAGO, ILL, 121-128 North Desplaines St. 

Ilriiiiiliis : 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O.. 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT. MICH., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
Sfl'ERloR. WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, WIS.. 515 East Second St. 
LAY CITY. MICH., 919 North Water St. 
RACINE, WIS., 923 Forest St. 
MANITOWOC, WIS., 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA.. 107 Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARDOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL., 138 Ninety-second St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams St. 
OGDENSBLRG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St. 
Branches: 
DETROIT. MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
T, ILEDO. O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. V.. 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, WASH., 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH., 88% Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
I'< 'KTLAND. OR., 23 North Front St. 
EUREKA, CAL, P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. P. O. Box 2380. 
< H.ILU, H. I., P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FKANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Branch : 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MUIINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarter* : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 
Branches ■ 

SEATTLE. WASH.. Colman Dock. Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S I MON OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEVS UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION 

Headquarters. Astoria. Or. 
H. M. lorntsev Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room Is open at all times to Members 

of the Sailors' Union. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 

^TRADES fe?[jc0UNCK_fr 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mis- 
sion. 

American Printing- House, 1067 Market. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 
Barry, James H., The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Benson & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., 321 Cali- 
fornia. 

Brunt, W. N., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 

California Printing Co., 41-43 Eighth. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Commercial Publishing Co., S. E. cor. 
First and Mission. 

Cook, The Morton L,., Second and Minna. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 

Dettmar, C. H., 529 California. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 

Fording & Payne, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 103-109 Union 
Square. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 1019 
Market. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden West Press, 527 Mission. 

Gould, W. H., 1019 Market. 

Hancock Bros., 73 Third. 

Harvey, John D., 246 Sutter. 

Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hiester, Wm. A., City Hall Square. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hinton Printing Co., 516 Commercial. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lacaze, I/., 519 California. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Leidecker, C. Co., 156 New Montgomery 

Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press. The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Meyerfeld, Albert M.. 414 Pine. 

Meyer Printing Co., 638 Mission. 

Mission Free Press, The. 2401 Mission. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Munk, R., 809 Mission. 

Murdock. C. A. & Co.. 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Pacific Heights Printery, 2438 Sacra- 
mento. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M., 1010 Buchanan. 

Phillips, Smyth & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 723 Montgomery. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-325 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Shanley, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Spaulding. Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co.. 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co.. 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co.. 656 Mission. 

Sterett, W. I. Co.. 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 213 Stevenson. 

Steutzel & Co., 109 California. 

Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square Ave. 

Town Talk Printing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Turner. H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Upton Bros.. 17 Fremont. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wahl & Drake, 850 Market. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Wenderoth & Brown. 319 California. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co.. 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Bookbinders. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power, 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Kitchen, John Jr. Co., 510-514 Commer- 
cial. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

McGeeney, Wm. H, 33 Stevenson. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 
Lithographers and Printers. 

Britton & Rey, 525 Commercial. 

Galloway Lithographing Co., 410 San- 
some. 

Roesch Co., Louis, 321-325 Sansome. 
Photo-Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Mont- 
gomery, near Mission. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Mission. 

Lewis & Newberry Co., 645 Market. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant Ave. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 

Union Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 
Ave. 

Yosemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 

American Press Association, 207 Sacra- 
mento. 

Hoffschneider Bros., 412 Commercial. 

Martin & Co., 608 Clay. 



UNION MADE BY UNION MAIDS 



A 



EVE 

ACCI 
CINAL 

IYNE 








DO 

m 


RESPE 

10 OTHER 

UST 

9N-MADE 1 

NN & C 

F. 


CO 
H 


p < - o 




s m h 





V 



Forsberg Bros. 

TAILORS - 



36 Geary Street 

Room 29. Phone Black 4711. 

Suits made to order First-class work 
from $20 up. Only. 



Expert 
Fattens 

Make the best shoes 
give better service. 

Every "Rightway" 
fitter is an expert. 

Every shoe the best 
for the price. 



The Rightway Shoe Co. 

812-814 Market St. 
Phelan Building 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



$1 a week mil 

Gold Watch or Diamond I 

UNITED STATES | 
WATCH CLUB! 

640 MARKET ST., ROOM 3 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager. 




WHEN DRINKING BEER 




SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



Union Boot & Shoe Store 



United Woekingmen 
Co-Operative Company's 
I-Uioes Constantly on Hand 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

C LESTER, 12 Steuart St. 



m 



44 EAST STREET 

Room 6— Phone Bush 341 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

ALTERING AND REPAIRING 



J. M. RICHARDS, Prop. 



The Castle Cigar Store 

250 East Street, near Folsom, 
KEEPS THE 
BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS AND TO- 
BACCOS. 

Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
G. H. PALMER, Proprietor. 



Be Sii Go-OperatiYG Tailors 






English Worsted Suit $15.00 
English Tweed Suit . 15.00 
Scotch Tweed Suit . 13.50 



XXXX Beaver Suit . $22.50 
French Pequet C. & V. 15.00 
English Serge . . . 14.00 



PANTS TO ORDER, $4.00 ^^From'" 

By co-operating- together we are enabled to make you a suit of any ma- 
terial known, on a profit of $2.50, be t XXXX Beaver or French Cassimere. 
Not a trust — but co-operation. (J JJ | UfgMM i 

Dependable Work, You Select the Cloth. 

Perfect Fit. "We Do the Work. 

CAN YOU TOUCH THE ABOVE PRICES ELSEWHERE? 

- 31 Market Street 

WE ARK OUR OWN 
BOSSES. 



THE SIX CO-OPERATIVE TAILORS, 

We are far down Market Street. -ggg 

Rea.son: Kent, $15 per uionth. "'i'.' 1 :;;. 



World's Workers. 

Packers and porters have formed a 
union at Fremantle, West Australia. 

A plan for pensioning workmen will 
come up before the next French Par- 
liament. 

From GOO to 700 men in West Austra- 
lia have been thrown out of employment 
owing to slackness of work and the clos- 
ing down of timber mills. 

A railway is now being built at Eiben- 
stoek, Germany, on which 150 laborers, 
mostly Bohemians, are employed. They 
are paid from 60 to 72 cents a day. 

Workmen and workwomen in Kussian 
factories receive from 20 to 75 cents 
a day. The work is said to be so hard 
that most of them are wrecks before 
they reach the age of 40. 

The extensive and prolonged strike of 
the workmen and others engaged in the 
maritime interests at Marseilles, France 
was practically ended on October 1 by 
the signing of an agreement between the 
dock laborers and the companies em- 
ploying them regulating the conditions 
of employment. 

At a recent meeting of the Trades 
and Labor Council of Kalgoorlie, West 
Australia, the proposition was sub- 
mitted that the working day for miners 
should consist of six hours instead of 
eight, as at present. The reason as- 
signed was that there was a large num- 
ber of men out of work in the district, 
and that by shortening the hours more 
men would be employed. 

During July twelve New Zealand em- 
ployers were fined by the Arbitration 
Court for paying less than the rate of 
wages fixed by the Court, and three were 
ordered to pay up the back wages; the 
the fines ranged from fl to £10, and 
costs were granted in each case. For 
employing girls as apprentices without 
indenture, ten employers were fined va- 
rious amounts from £2 to £10, and costs. 

The Adelaide (South Australia) 
Women Workers' Trade Union is en- 
endeavoring to establish a Mending Bu- 
reau, the members of which will go out 
to do a day's mending of clothes, etc., 
or repair articles sent to them. This, 
it is hoped, will prove a boon to many 
a mother with a large family, and at 
the same time be the means of earning 
a livelihood for those not capable of 
competing for factory work. 

Having failed to fix up a satisfactory 
industrial agreement with the employers, 
The Sydney (New South Wales) Elec- 
trical Employes' Union has decided to 
apply to the Arbitration Court for bet- 
ter wages, conditions, etc. The follow- 
rates are demanded: lis. per day for 
engineers attending machinery, and 
switchboard attendants; lis. for lead- 
ing wiremen ; 10s. for wiremen, and 9s. 
for certain specified branches of the 
trade. 

The delegation of French workmen 
sent at the expense of the French Gov- 
ernment to the St. Louis Exposition ar- 
rived at New York on September 25. The 
industries represented are the manufac- 
ture of musical instruments, cotton, 
shoes, hats, tools and railroad supplies. 
There are also representatives of nation- 
al labor organizations and experts in 
mail distribution. Metin Albert, pro- 
fessor at the French Colonial and Naval 
Cadet schools, heads the delegation of 
workmen. 

A twenty-four-hour strike has been in- 
augurated at Florence, Leghorn, Naples, 
Venice, Siena, Carrara, Ascoli and No- 
vara, while the strike has come to an end 
at Ancona, Forli, Como and Genoa, 
where railroad traffic has been regularly 
resumed. The strike at Milan continues, 
but the shops of that city are open and 
the railway service is regular. A dis- 
patch from Naples says that a meeting 
of strikers there ended in a conflict with 
the police, and that the latter by firing 
in the air dispersed the crowd. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



General News. 



It is authoritatively denied thai Rus- 
sian Minister Lessar La negotiating at 

Peking for tiic cessation of the Manchu- 
rian Railway to China. 

Confirmation has been received of the 
report of the conclusion of peace be 
tween the Uruguayan Government and 
the revolutionists under General Munoz. 

The expulsion of a woman's religious 

order at lloubaix. France, recently caus- 
ed violent demonstrations, during which 
a number of persons were injured. The 
police finally restored order. 

The Duke of Orleans has asked per- 
mission of the Norwegian Government 
to hire the Arctic steamer Pram, in 
which Dr. Xansen made his voyage to 
the Arctic regions, for the purpose of 
an An-lic expedition in 1005. 

Judge Parker's letter formally accept- 
ing the Democratic nomination for 
President has been made public. 11" 
opposes imperialism, favors tariff re- 
vision, Philippine independence and 
economy in Government expenditure. 

Two daughters of S. C. Stuart, of 
Houston, Tex., who was found dead in 
bed with his head almost severed, have 
confessed to the crime. They are thir- 
teen and sixteen years old. They declare 
their father threatened to exterminate 
the entire family of four girls. 

The tir-t payment of $2,000,0(10 on ac- 
count of the purchase of the friars' lands 
in the Philippines was recently authoriz- 
ed by the War Department. A draft 
will be made on the Bank of England, 
which will pay over the money to the 
Sociedad Agricola del Ultramar. 

Extracts of the New York Central and 
Hudson River Railroad Company's an- 
nual report just made public show gTOSfi 
earnings of $77,082,221. an increase of 
$76,443 over the previous year. Ex- 
penses increased $2,300,746, showing a 
decrease in net earnings of $2,224,303. 

October dividend declarations thus far 
made by industrial corporations in New 
York show an increase in the total of 
about $2,800,000 over last year. This 
increase is shown despite the fact that 
two dividends amounting to ncarh 
$800,000, which figured in the October. 
1903, list are now missing. 

sir Walter Lawrence, private Beore 
tary to Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India. 
has declared that without doubt, there 

will be a war between England and Rus- 
sia nexi spring. I'h is view is said tc 
he shared by Lord Kitchener and all of 
his officials in India, and he added that 
many big guns were being sent out quiet- 
ly to India all the time, and every prep- 
aration was being made for a long cam- 
paign. 

An order recently issued by the Quar- 
termaster's Department of the United 
states Army will deprive many widows 
and orphans of soldiers of work at the 
Schuylkill (Pa. I Arsenal, where women 
have been making clothing since the close 
of the Civil War. It is now proposed 
to give this work to large contractors, 
,,ii the ground that it can be done more 
quickly and cheaply. It is estimated 
that on the two items of .-..i.OOO pain of 
pants and 175,000 shirts the Government 
will save $30,000. 

Melton Prior, the Illustrated London 
News artist, who arrived at Honolulu. 
T. H., recently, from Yokohama, says he 
feels absolutely certain that the war in 
the Far East will lead to European com- 
plications and to the most awful war in 
the world'- history. Mr. Prior complains 
that Japan has displayed bad faith to- 
ward all flu correspondents. This, he 

saVB, is his twenty-seventh compaign 
and it is the only one in which he has 
seen nothing. He believes that, with the 
possible exception of the battle of Liao 
Van", not one correspondent has seen a 
shot fired, and he even doubts if the Liao 
Yang fighting was witnessed by a news 
paper man. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters are advertised for six months 
and kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not called 
for at the expiration of one year letters 
will be returned to the Postoffice. 



Aagard. A. M. 
Adolf, John 
Adreasen, Edvln 
Agerup, Rich. 
Ahlquist. Albert 
Alexis, Hakan 
Allan, John 
Amundsen, Pet 
Amundson, Alf. 
Andersen-689 
Andersen-853 
Andersen-912 
Andersen-925 
Andersen-1233 



Anderson, Carl Alf 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, H.-403 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersson-139 
Andersson-1082 
Andersson-1115 
Andersson-1184 
Andersson, A. W. 
Andersson, C. S. 
Andersson. Eskil 
Andersson, John 
Andersson, John G. 
Andersson, K. E. W. 



Andersen, Bernhard Antonsen, Martin 
Andersen, B. Hj. Apps. Alf 



Andersen, Ole 

Anderson-58 

Anderson, A. E. 

Anderson, Axel 

Baker, C. P. 

Baker, John 

Balcom, B. M. 

Barber, A. 

Barrett, Wm. 

Bastion. W. 

Bauer, K. O. 

Bauer, Ludv. 

Baugh, A. E. 

Bechler, Joseph 

I tengtsson-1171 

Berger-1210 

Berlenz, Emil 

Bernard, S. 

Bernert, Fred 

Leyerle, R. 

Blankenfeld, O. 

Blinne, Karl 

Blomberg, Gus 

Blom, Philip 

Cainan, Geo. 

('arisen, C. W. 

Carlsen, E.-699 

Carlsen, Johan A. 

Carlsen, John L. 

Carlsen, Thomas 

Carlson-449 

Carlson. C. V. 

Carlsson-551 

Carlsson, Axel G. 

Carlsson, John 

Carlsson, W. S. 

Carnaghan, Mr. 

Caroe, Arthur 

Dabel, W. G. 

Dahl, John M. 

Dahlberg, Gunnar 

Dahlgren, Albin 

Dahlgren, Karl 

Daniel. J. — (M) 

De Haan, G. A. 

Edalf, C. 

Ehrhardt. A. 

Ekhart, W. 

Ekstrom. J. P. 

Ellison. Ed N. 

Els, John 

Emanuelsen, C. 

Enbom, Wm. 

Fabricius, H.-170 

Fahleson, John E. 

Fischer, A. -440 

Fjeldstad, Olai 

Flodln, John 

Foreman, N. 

Forstrom, Fr. 

Gabrielsen. Knud 

Gaedecke. E. 

Gasman, Geo. A. 

Gilbert, Wm. S. 

Gjasdal. Elling 

Glaubltz, Fred 

Gohring. Wm. 

Gothe, Victor B. 

Haarssen, J. 

Haberman, H. 

Hakansson, G. 

Halvorsen, H. 

Halvorsen, Morten 

Halvorsen. Wm. 

Hansen-1162 

llansen-1218 

Hansen, Andrew 

: [ansen, Geo.-1410 

Hansen, Hans P. 

Hansen, H. Sigur 

Hansen, John P. 

Hansen, Maurius 

Hansen, Nokhart M.Holm, Oscar 

Hansen, Theo.-1218 Holtti, John 

Hansson-1270 

I [ansson, Hilmer 

Hardy, Wm. 



Ardelenu, Joan 
Arnesen-1111 
Arnesen. Ragnvald 
Asmussen, M. C. 
Bock, Chas. 
Bogvist, Chas. 
Bohlen-1283 
Bohnhoff, H. 
Boiling, O. 
Borlnl, Lewis 
Horl well, Martin 
Bottcher, J. G. C. 
I ioudoux, Leon 
Brandters, J. 
Braun, F.-1195 
Bredesen, Edwin 
Brillowsky, N. 
Brooman, Henry 
Brose, R. 
Brown. E. 
Buck. Harry 
Bush, W. 
Byerling, C. A. 

Christensen-851 
Christensen, E. 
Christensen, G. L. 
Christensen, Henrik 
Christensen, J. R. 
Christensen, O. M. 
Clausen-793 
Cleary. Thomas 
Coadon, Louis 
Connor, John J. 
Connor, Wm. 
Cooper, Hans 
Cuno. J. 
Cutmann, A. R. 
Dexter, Geo. S. 
in, A. H. 
Doense. J. 
Dorlis. Harold 
Dorsch, Fred 
Draeger, M. 
Dyck. Max 
Engell, Emil 
F.ngstrom. C. 
Erlksen-512 
Erlksen-513 
Erikson, E. 
Ettershank, J. 
Evald, Ernst 
Evensen. Einar O. 
Foster, Frank 
Fox, Thomas 
Foyn, Sam 
Frandsen, Frands P. 
Freiman, August 
French. J. A. 
Furst. John 
Grandahl, Hjalmar 
Gray, J. K. 
Grey, E. J. 
Gulbransen, Nils 
Gundersen-515 
Gundersen, Jacob 
Gunlach, John 
Gunther. Th. 
Hell, A.-1012 
Helsteen-1241 
1 1, nriksen, Krisi 
Henrikson, Axel 
Hesselberg, Chas. 
Hesselberg, K. 
Hetebrugge, W. 
Hill-1148 
Hinner, Paul 
Hixson. J. W. 
Hobson, Thomas 
Hokansson, Fred 
Holmes, Chris 
Holmes. Martin 



Harned, Will E. 
Harriman, Wm. S. 
Hay, \Vm.-1179 
Hazel, W. 
Hedberg, Alf 
Heleneus-1360 
lid. Julius 
llstail. Olaus 
Jacobsen-l 12(1 
Jacobsen, Emil 
Jakobsen. N. C. 
Jankeri, Oskar 
Janssen, Weert 
Jansson-1234 
.lansson, John 
Jens, Otto 
Jensen-769 
Jensen-1461 
Jensen, Anders C. 
Jensen, C. F. 
Jensen, Gust. 
Jensen. H.-S69 
Jensen. Martin 
Jensen. Rasmus 
J oh nserj 
Jnhansen-1030 
Johansen, B. J. 
Johansen, F. C. 
.1 ohansen, G. E. 
Johansson-880 
Kaehne, R. 
Kanger, Herman 
Karlsen, John L. 
Karlsen. Thomas 
Karlson-551 
ECarlsoi 

Karlson. Karl R. 
Karlsson-503 
Karlsson, G. J. 
Karlsson, O. S. 
Kask, John 
Kennedy, M. J. 
Kerharo, Frank 
Kepmka, R. 
Kihl. Harry 
Kittilsen. Laurits 
KJar, Niels 
Lang, John 
Lang. Otto 



llornberg-1383 
Horn, Krlst 
Horstman, H. 
Hoss, John 
Houston, Rob 
Hultman, Carl 
Hult. Wm. 
Hurley, James 
I turley, Wm. 
Isaksson, G. E. 

Johansson- 1095 
Johansson-1108 
Johansson-1396 
Johansson-1544 
Johansson, A. 
Johansson, Aug. 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson. Nils L. 
Johnsen-983 
Johnson-588 
Johnson-1300 
Johnson, Ed. F. E. 
Johnson, W. J. 
Johnson, Wm. 
Jonasen. Rasmus 
.lungjohan. J. 
Jonsen. Ingvald 
Jorgensen, Theo. 
Jorgensen, Walde- 

mar 
Jorgensen, 'Walter 
Joseph, E. S. 
Klausen, Carl J. 
Klausner, Karl 
Knudsen, Fred 
Knutsson, O. H. 
Kokkala, H. 
Kollmann-386 
Korsman, Erik 
Krane, Karl 
Kristensen-928 
Kristensen, H. 
Kristensen, O. M. 
Kristiansen, T. O. 
Kristoffersen -61 4 
Krogstad, Eugen 
Krohnert, Alb. 
Kung, H. 

Leineweber, J. 
Lewin, Chas. 



Langvardt, N. 
Larkin, Sam 
Larsen-643 
n-TiJ'J 
Larsen-916 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen. C.-S24 
Larsen, Hans 
Larsen, Julius H. 
Larson, Manne 
Larsson-933 
Larsson, Efrlam 
Laskey, W. 
Lau, Gust. 
Laverty. R, C. L, 
Lee-608 

Legallais, Jules 
Madison, David 
Madsen-952 
Madsen, C.-905 
Madsen, Hans M. 
Madsen, I.. B. 
Magnusson. C. W. 
i- son. Karl 
Mahoney, F. E. 
Mahoney, Tat 
Malmkvist. Carl 
Mardeson, Andrew 
Martelock, Chas. 
Materre, Alex 
Mathiasen, Nils 
Mathlson, J. M. 
Matiasen, Nils 
Mattejat, W. 
Maunstrom, Wm. 
McCarthy, Peter 
McCombs, F. S. 
Naumnn. Alf. 
Neilsen, M. P. 
Nelson-663 
Nichlasen. N. C. 
Nielsen-678 

: i - V .") 1 

Nielsen-Tat 
Nielsen-859 
Nielsen, Berger 
Nielsen, Ole 
Nielsen. Peder 
Oberg, Herbert 
Oberhauser, J. 
Oliegrun, John 
Olsen-206 
Olsen-530 
: >lsen-699 
Olsen, Cornelius 
Olsen, Hans J. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Paersson, C. A. 
Palsen, Torwald 
Papke, Harry 
Passon, Bruno 
Peabody, Frank 
Pearson-4-7 
Pedersen-793 
Pedersen, Chr. 
Pedersen, r i'h. K. 
Pederson, Louis 
Perry, Ben 
Parsing, Henrv 
Petersen-659 
Fett-irsen-903 
Rahlf, Jurgen 
Raig, Tormod 
Rasmusen, Alb. 
Rasmussen-525 
Rasmussen, Geo. P. 
Renlund. Andrew 
Riches, Alf.-663 
Robinson, W. 
Saart, Aug. 



Lie, Carl-1042 
Lillie, Fred 
Lindquist, C. 
Llndstrom, G. A. 
Lite, Knut 
Lockwood, Chas. 
Lofberg, F. Magnus 
Lofgren, C. W. 
l.oi man, Werner 
London, Frank 
Lorentzen-990 
Lorenzen. Jorgen 
Lorenz, O. E. 
I.uden, Albln 
Ludolph, H. 
Lund, Chas. 

McGarrlck, John 
McKeating. R. 
Meinseth. Albert 
Meland, Edius 
Menthen, Otto 
Merriam, B. W. 
Mikkelsen, S. 
Mjones. Arne 
Morisse. D. 
Morre, B. F. 
Morris, Wm. T. 
Morstadt, A. T. 
Mortenson, Crist 
Mortensen. M. H. 
Mullen, Leo L. 
Muller, R. 
Mullins, Dan 
Munroe, Harry Geo. 
Munson. Michael 
Murstadt, A. F. 
Nielsen, W. 
Nielsen. Willie 
Nilsson-731 
Nissen, J. 
Nissen, James 
Nordblom, B. G. 
Norheim, Johan 
Nurse, Uriah 
Nymann. J. C. P. 
Nyroos-769 

Olsen, Sam 
Olsen, Terje 
Olsin, olaf S. 
Olson, Olof 
Olson. Otto B. 
Olsson-597 
Olsson-812 
oisson-824 
Orchard. S. H. 
Petersen-954 
Petersen. Viktor 
Peterson-920 
Peterson. J. P. 
Peterson. Karl E. 
Felterson, Knot 
Pettersson-725 
Phalr. Wm. 
Pick. R. O. W. 
Piedvache, E. 
Pollack, Paul 
iss, Fred 
Puika, Christ 

Rohl, Werner 
Rolke, Geo. 
Rollo. R. 
Rosan, Oscar 

ito^s. n. I. T. 
Ruellans. Jules 
Kimil. Louis 

id, Sverre 
Silverberg, Harald 



Salhareasen, Jorgen feimonsen-1147 



Salvesen, Sam 
Samsloe, Sven 
Sandav. Frank 
Sandberg-938 
Sandberg. Theodor 
Sander-1068 
Santos, Augustln 
Sausln, Robert 
Schade. Wcnzel 
Schaefer, T. 
Scheller, Otto 
Schibsted, John 
Schluter, Johan 
Schnaekenberg, L. 

W. 
Schubert-887 
Schultz-1307 
Schutties. Eugen 
Schwenke, K8rl 
Scott, H. C. 
Sehey, J. O. 
Self, Arthur 
Setterberg. K. 
Shubert, Otto 
Siltberg, Chas. 
Silva. Joe H. 
Thiele. A. 
Tlioren, (Just 
Thorn, Arvid 
Thorssen, Fred 
Tompson, Loui 
Udby. Harold 
Udd, John-885 
Uken, H. 
Vassallo, P. 
Vermaas, G. 
Vick, Chas. 
Vlckstrom, a. 
Viereck, Heinrich 
Viereck. Robert 
Wagner, J. 
Wall, R. A.-744 
Walter, E. 
Walters, Harry 
Warren, Frank 
Warren. W. A. 
Weibust, John 
Welden. Ed 
Weide. Paul 
Welsh. John 
Wendelborg. A. 
Werner. Oscar 
Wesik, Gust 
Westerholm. V. 
Yerna. Frank 
Zaohrisen, J. M. 
Ziffer, Chas. 



W. 



Sirvertsen. Hilmar 
Sjursen. Ingvald 
Smith. John A. 
Smith, Valdemar 
Smith. W. 
Snow, Fred 
Soderman, Elis 
Solbe, Ingwald 
Sorensen-1460 
Sorensen, N. 
Sorensen, Theo. 
Sorensen. T. M. 
Staaf-1464 
Stahn. Otto 
Stephan — 1455 
Sterne, Geo. 
Btjerna, s. m. 
Strings, Claus 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundholm, i:rlk 
Sundholm, Frans 
Svansson, Chas. 
Svendsen-1568 
Svendsen. Otto 
Bvensgaa rd, Peder 
Swederius. C. E. 
Torgussen-482 
Torkkel. Kristian 
Tornberg? C. A. 
Tvedt. U.S. 
Tulin. Fritz 
Ulright. T. 
Unterein, F. 

Vincent, Jos. 
Vogel, A. 
Void, O. P. 
Von Asperen. Wm. 
Von Kleist. II. 
Vuclch, V. 
Westin, John 
Wiberg. John 
Wickmann, John 
Wiebke, Ernst 
Wljk, H. 

Wilhelmsen. Chas. 
Will, Clem 
Will. Geo. 
Williams. R. E. 
Wilson, Robert 
Winter, John 
Wirnhof. P. 
Wright. C. 
Wright. W. B. 
Younger. A. J. 
Zlllman, B. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 
Ahlstrom, Alf Berg. Thos. A. 

A 1 hers. Geo. 
Albertsen, Johan- 
nes 
Altonen, G. N. 
Andersen, A. -826 
Andersen, Fred H, 
Andersen, L. T. 
Andersen, V. V.-991 Carlson, L. P. 
Anderson, Alfred Ceconl, F. 
Anderson, Charlie 
Anderson, J. 



Berglund. A. 
Bluseth, M. 
Prm .m. A. 
Cameron, H. B. 
Cameron. R. 
Campbell, John 
Canrenus. W. 



Anderson, J. Edv. 
Anderson. Wm. 
Arcedius, Ture 
Arnesen. Anders 
Baker, Ed 
Balke, E. 
Bauer. K. I. 
Beckwith. W. N. 



Charlson. D. 
Christensen, Adolf 
Christensen, G. L. 
Christensen. K. 
Christoffersen, Hans 
Clausen, C. J. 
Cockran, R. B. 
Dahlgren, C. J. 
Dahlberg, Joseuh 
Daly, J. 



Didriksen, I. 
Dyk, C. J. Van 
Edvardsen. J. 
Eichman. W. 
Kklund. H. 
Kriksen, Fred 
Felix, L. 
Fergusen. J. 
Fjelstad. O. 
Forstrim. C. 
Francis, E. C. 
Gonderson, M. 
Gonzales. F. 
Grainger, J. 
Greenland, H. 
Gregor, Edvin 
Gronlund, O. 
Guke, John 
Gundersen. Anton 
Haglund, Carl 
Haldorsen, A. E. 
Hanley. J. 
Hansen, Alfred 
Hansen, Edvard 
Hansen, Henry 
Hansen, H. E. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hansen, Markus H. 
Healey, T. 
Hellman. Carl 
Henriksen, Joseph 
Hermansen, Albert 
Hermansen, F. 
Hermansen, L. 
Hofman, F. 
I loving, B. A. 
Huhley. Howard 
Jacobsen, J. A.-779 
Jacobson, Oscar 
Jensen, G. A. 
Johansen, L.-1210 
Johansen, 0.-139 
Johansen, Wm. 
Johanson, H.-135 
Johnson. Chas. 
Jollnit. W. 
Jones, B. O. 
Jonsen, L. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, E. 
Johansen. Hans 
johannesen, J. -1119 
Johnson. Hjalmar 
Johnson, James 
Johnson, John 
Josefsen, F. W. 
Jurgess, J. A. 
Jungjahan, H. C. 
Keastner, Hans 
Kloperstrom. W. 
Knudsen. Sam 
Kongsvald, R. 
Kopplin, Robert 
Krallman, A. 
Lalne, F. 
Larsen, A. -311 
Larsen, Axel 
Larsen, C. L. 
Larsen. E.-933 
Larson, Nils 
Lauren, J. O. 
Lehman, J. 
Lie, J. L. 
Lind, John 
Lind, K.-885 
Lindstrom, A. 
Lohlin. John 
Long, John 
Lorentsen, J. P. 
Madsen, C. H. 
Magnusen, Gus 
Magnusen, E. W. 
Martinsen. K. 
Mayer. Albert 
Mayerkanys. W. 
Mayne. J. R. 
Meyer, Albert 
Mietenen, A. E. 
Morrisse, D. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Akselsen. Johan Gustafson, Oskar 

Akerblum. Charles 
Allen, John 



Munson, M. 
Nicklasen, H. 
Nilson, C. 
Nilson, H.-680 
Nilson, H. 
Nilson, O. 
Nissen, Eskeld 
Nissen, Jens 
Nuitanen, H. 
Oberg, C. W. 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. 
Olsen, Carl J. 
Olsen. i:. 
Olsen, E. M. 
Olsen, L. K. 
Olsen, Marius 
Olsen, O. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, P. F. 
Olsen, P. O. 
Olsen, R. 
Olsen, Sam 
Paaso, And 
Paulson. C. 
Pearson, J. 
Pedersen, H. P. 
Federson. Lars 
Pehrsing, H. 
Pendergast. E. 
1 • ndville. N. 
Petersen, H. A. 
Petersen, P. 

son, John 
Pettersen, E. 
Petterson, Otto 
Pieper. H. 
Prell. H. 
Pringle, R. 
Ramm, Wm. 
Rasmussen, M. 
Reineh, H. 
Riordan, P. 
Robertsen. M. 
Rogne, J. T. 

A. M.-1447 
Salonen. E. 
Salvesen. K. 
Sandberg, A. 
Sarin. C. 
Schoien. J. 
Schwartskopf, P. 
Selander, G. 
Severtsen, Geo. 
Simonsen, F. 
Smith. C. A. 
Smith. Paul 
Smith. Wm. 
Soderman, J. M. 
Sorensen, Chas. 
Sorensen. H. M 
Sorensen, P. C. 
Sorensen, P. K. 
Sovifc M. 
Stahsing, W. 

a, A. 
Strom. J. G. 
Sullivan, W. J. 
Svensen, Sven 
Su ansen, G. H. 
Rwanson, John 
Swensen-1013 
Swensen, T. 
Thayfon. John 
Thompson. Robert 
Thomsen. Ed 
Thorsen, M. 
Thorsen, Theo. 
Wahrunberg, O. 
Walker, Geo. 
Warren. Wm. 
Wennerlund, A. 
Welzel. K. 
Wich, W. 

Wie, A. 

Wiedner. K. 
Wilson, Thos. 
White, J. 
Zelinski, P. 



Amelsen. Johan 
Amnell, Albert 
Andersen-735 
Anderson-907 
Andersen-912 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, Edvard 
Andersen, Ingbret 

A. 
Andersen, Joseph 
Andersen, Salve 

Anderson, A. B.-11PJ I lull.'llarrv 
Anderson, A. J. Janhunen, w. 

Anderson. Alfred Janson. C. L. 
Anderson. A. G.-549 Jansson, Carl W. 
Anderson, Bertinius Jean, H. G.-386 

G. n. G. L.-1461 

Anderson. K.-G71 Ji risen I ewls 
Anderson, John 



Gustavsen, Ben 

Halversen. Wm. 
Ham. H. P. 
Hansen, Alf V. G. 
Hansen. Bernhard 

a. Laurits 
l la nsen, Theodor 
Harding, W. J. 
I [augan, Hilmar 
Helmke, r. a. 

I lenders, Ml. J. 

Hinze, a. k. w. 
I lolappa, < iskar 



Anderson. Martin 

Anderson, Otto 

Anderson, S. 

Anderssen-853 

Armale, Frans 

Arvidsen, Axel M. 

Baker, John 

Bixby, E. 

Blomquist, H. 

Bock, Charles 

Bogan, Patrick 

Bohman. Eric 

Boose, Paul-606 

Boren, William 

Bortram. Wm. 
(package) 

Brouford, Charles 

Bryndal. Henry 

Caramatic, Charlie 

Carlson, August 

Carlson, Eric 

Carlson, J. 

Carlson. J.-388 

Carnaghan, W. N. 

Cheodore, Bodli >U 

Chris tophersen, Carl 

Clausson. G. A. -804 

Coffman, Hilo 

Comerford. L. 

Crockstat, J. 

rich. Hermann 

Edlund. J. A. 

1. Charles 

Erikson, Alfred 
Axel 

Fagerlund. G. E. 

Forsman, Arthur 

Frietrom, I. M. 

Giffln. Jim W. 

Green. F. 

Gronvall. Johan 
Frcderik 

Grunbock. Johan 
eh. John 

Gustafson, A. F. 

Gustafson, J.-432 

Gustafson, K. Os- 
kar 



lenseii, Rasmus 
.1' hi nnesen, Jacob 

on, J. -1462 
Joha iisioi. Natanial 
Joha nsson, Carl- 

i 5 i 9 
Joha nsson. Carl L. 
Johnda hi. Harry 
Johnsen, Carl-5?8 
Johnsoii-1 281 
Johnson. Edward 
Johnson. Edward A. 
Johnson. Michael 

m. P. 
Johnston. O. W. 
Johnson. Chas. 
Joranson, P. J. 
Karlson. J. A. 
Kirlson-388 
Karlsson. Gustaf. 

Ernst 

Karlsson. John 
K. una. Peter J. Me 
Kihl, Harry 
Kit telsen. Laurits 
Klingstrom, Gun- 
nar 
Klover, H.-463 
Knudsen, Daniel 
Kristensen. Gustav 
Kristoffersen, H. B. 
Kristoffersen, Karl 

A. 
Larson. Gust. 
Larson. Olaf Edvard 
Passkey, ,1. 

Lehtonen, V, 
Llndqvlst, Carl 
l.i venhjelrn, E. M. 
Lundberg, Erik 
I.iindin. Charles 
Mo kelalnen, J. 
Markm.inn, Hein- 
rieh 

n. Victor 
i oi. A. 
Mikklesen. C, 
Myhrvold. Chris- 
tian 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE (ED FRONT 



THE ONLY STORE ON THE 
■WATER FRONT OF HONOLULU 
EMPLOYING WHITE LABOR 
EXCLUSIVELY. 



SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 



FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
OIL CLOTHING, TRUNKS, 
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS 

THE RED FRONT 

COR. QUEEN AND NUANU STS. 
HONOLULU, H. I. 



MYRTLE CIGAR STORE 

Importers and Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. 

The only House keeping a full line of 

Union-made Goods. 

T. J. FITZPATRICK, Proprietor. 

836 Fort Street. Honolulu, H. I. 



THE ISLAND MEAT GO. 

Wholesale and Retail Butchers 

Shipping and Family Orders Given Prompt 
Attention— Fresh Meats and Produce 

JAS. E. WESTBROOKE, Mgr. 

Telephone Main 76 , . „ _ 

Fort St., Opp. Love Bdg., Honolulu, M. T. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 

Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor, 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanu Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Nelson, T. H. 
Nielsen, Fred-629 
Nielson, N. C. 
Nissen, James 
Nilson, V. G. 
Nystrom, Emil 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, John B. 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, N.-502 
Olsen, Peder 
Olson, Adolf 
Olson. Benny 
Olson, W. 
Oosterhuis, R. 
Osterling, Emil 
Pedersen, Preston 
Persing, Henry 
Petersen, Charles 
Pettonen, K. H. 
Peterson, G. 
Peterson, Martin 
Rasmussen-446 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rasmussen, Olaf 
Rauer, H. 
Reid, James-326 
Robstad, Sorensen 

John 
Rohde, Robert 
Rosenblad, Karl 



Hoyden, W. H. 
Salvisen, A. 
Sandberg, Theodor 
Saunders, Carl 
Schilling, C. 
Schatze, Otto 
Sjonberg, Harald 
Sodergvist, Otto 
Soult, Theodor 
Staaf, Louis-1464 
Steffensen, Viggo 
Stolsten, Karl 
Strelow, Albert 
Svenson, Sven 
Svensson, Nicolaus 
Svensson, Thure 
Syvertsen, Isak 
Thallos. Mr. 
Thompson, Stephen 
Thorve, Gustav 

Danielsen 
Tomask. Math. 
Wahlstadt, Albert 
Walbergh, Joseph 
Warren, Fred 
Werner, Ruben 
Westerholm, Aug. 
Whyne, Fred 
Wikstrom, Anton O. 
Zugehaer, Alex. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Asmussen, McC. 
Anderson, Chas. 
Andersson, L. T.-735 
Anderson, J. Emil 
Andersen, Henry 
Anderson. Nils 
Brown, Frank 
Carlson, Pastar L. 
Carlson, Atel 
Dercks. Chr. 
Hansen, Hans Tea- 

dar 
Hansson, Gust. Hj. 
Halnberg, Alfred A. 
Halvarsen, H. 
Johnson, John 



Klint, Sam 
Lehnhard, W. 
Lovi, Alfred 
Meyerkana, Valter 
Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, Karl A. 
Patiyariski, P. 
Prauss, Fred 
Toucer, Chas. 
Sanders. Frank 
Spreeslis. Fred 
Sorensen, Thorn. 
Steffany, Joseph 
Walsh, P. R. 
Weiss, Wilhelm 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, Geo. 
Andersen, E. 
Anfindsen, O. 
Arntsen, E. 
Andersen, Lauritz 
Anderson, Ben 
Amerson, Olof 
Buch, D. 
Bernhardsen, K. 
Coffman, Milo 
Cedargren, A. 
Carlson, G. 
Christison, Harry 
Doyle, H. 
Dischler, P. 
Diedrichsen-786 
Engman, E. 
Eliasen, E. 
Farclig, B. 
Fergusen, J. 
Gasman, G. 
Horeldsen, Ch. 
Hansson, J. 
Hult, Wm. 
Hahuer, Fr. 
Hendrikson 
Halltham-1285 
Janhunen, F. 
Jones, Ch. 
Jordan, Ch. 
Jorgensen, P. 
Jorgensen, John 
Johansen, Martin 



Kent, S. 
Kuglund, C. 
Knudsen, S. A. 
Kolderup, K. 
Lillie, F. M. 
Lahde, Th. 
Lyche, N. 
Linden, M. A. 
Lmdstrom, Fr. 
Magnusen, C. E. 
Martinsen, F. 
Mathisen, M. 
Meinking, W. H. 
Miettinen, A. E. 
Nyroos, O. J. 
Olsen, O. J. 
Olsen, S. 
Owens, John 
Olsen, C. A. 
Petersen-782 
Peterson, P. 
Pettersen-856 
Roberts, Ch. 
Rogind, S. 
Svenson, Sven 
Salversen, Sam 
Stevensen, J. 
Schmidt, Ch. 
Thomas, John 
Westgard, L,. 
Wickstrom, A. 
Warren, Fr. 
Wilson, Rob. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store closes at 6 p. in.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



} McCORMACK BROS. } 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE — NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE, 



),WW%^%&%^%^%**%SV±<*%*&%^%^ 



TACOMA, WASH. 



News from Abroad. 



Call 
at 



The Union Cigar Store 



WHEN IN TACOMA 

FOR 



CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY AND 

PIPES. 

Local and 'Frisco Papers always on 

hand. 

2223 North Thirtieth Street. 

MERRIT TERRILL, Proprietor. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor 
call at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM AND ABERDEEN 

For your Clothing, Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Shoes, Rubber 

Boots and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND CAPS 



€40a. 




WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Anderson, Harry 
Begowick, John 
Bjornstad, Nils 
Boock, Christian 
Borlin, J. 
Bray, J. K. 
Brussell, Ed. 
Buch, David 
Eidswaag, Peter 
Ekerlein, Frans 
Eslon, V. 
Evans, John 
Furlong, James 
Furst, Ragner 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Granbom, Emil 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hanson, August 
Horsley, R. S. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johanson, Karl F. 
Johnsen, Martin 
Jorgensen, Sofas 
Jorgensen, Walter 
Karlson, Oscar S. 
Kask, John 
Kristianson, C. F. 



Lorentzen, E. M.- 

866 
Lubke, John Von 
Mackay, Joseph 
Martinson, Holger 

E. 
Nielson, Niels 
Nilsson, Henry 
Norheim, John 
Olsen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pott, George 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Sarnde, M. J. 
Sjonborg, Harold 
Smith, A. 
Soderman, Oscar 
Starkey, Wm. 
Stoessle, Camille 
Thampson, Harry 
Thompson, C. M.- 

251 
Vestergren, Anton 
Waldron, Harry 
Weide, Paul 
Wideberg, Oscar 
Zellmann, B. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



Ahlquist, Harry 
Anderson, Frank 
Braver, Dave 
Dahl, John A. -517 
Degeorges, Lion 
Dickson, Geo. 
Drummond, Steve 
Eckberg, C. E. 
Filliet, Lorenz 
Fletcher. W. S. 
Fristrom, Ivar 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Grondahl, John 
Gunluck, John 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Hellander, W. 
Hrelja, Frank 
Holmes, C. V. 
Horkman, T. 
Hansen, Hans Bas- 

berg 
Johansen, Soren 



Johansen, Edvard 
Jones, John 
Kohff, R. 

Katcharin. Jackob 
Kristiansen, Ferd 
Lindberg, John 
Linder-923 
Magnusen, Sven 
McRae, Alx. 
Merin, J. B. 
Muller, Frank 
Nelson, Chas. -393 
Nilsen, H. 
Revfem, Fied 
Richardson, Hilmar 
Rice, Patrik B. 
Shov, Lauritz 
Stephan, C. 
Saderlund. Chas. 
Wieting, Heinrich 
Wahlstedt, A.-778 
Westerberg, Nils 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



Borkman, F. 
Cole, H. 
Eggers, J. 
Hansen, M. 
1 laroldson, C. 
Hillborn, F. 
Hansson-1270 
Jakkopsen, J. 
Kure, P. 
Nelson, S. H. 
Olsen, C. A. 
Ouchterlong, F. 



Passon, T. 
Peabody, F. 
Rohden, A. 
Rose, W. K. 
Sinlor, A. K. 
Sigvartsen, C. O. 
Sohrimper, F. 
Thorsen, T. 
Todt, J. 
Thomas, J. 
Wouters, H. 
Vatland, G. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
— Visit — 

WALTER EHRLICHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 
be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS, 



JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 

UNION MADE 
Watches & Jewelry 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 




HERON STREET, 



UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOG EL 

Watch for the Red Front, 
24 Heron Street. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



(Continued on page 16.) 



You can get good 

HONEST UNION-MADE GOODS 

FROM 

A. W. BARKLEY 

56 G Street 

Becker Block, next to Bicycle Works, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 
He carries everything a sailor wears. 



Have your photographs made while in port by 

THE ABERDEEN ART GO. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 

Marine Views, Enlarging, Copying, 
& Crayon Portraits, Picture Frames. 

C. V. LOV, Prop. 
406 Market St. Aberdeen, Wash. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Agency for Aberdeen Steam Laundry. 

Stand on entrance to Union Office. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



W. C. JUDSOIN 

... EXPRESSMAN ... 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
phone .... ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Sailors' and Loggers' Outfitters 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods Hats, 
Shoes Rubber Boots and Oilskins. 



THE RELIABLE 
CLOTHIER . . . 



GEO. FISHER 

Heron Street, ABERDEEN, WASH. 



King Peter of Servia was crowned at 
Belgrade on September 21. 

The Austrian Government has ordered 
twenty-two torpedo boats from a Glas- 
gow (Scotland) firm. 

United States Consul-General Mason, 
at Berlin, Germany, reports a short 
grain crop in Central Europe. 

Germany has made preparations foi 
an extensive campaign against 11k 1 hos 
tile tribes in Southwest Africa. 

France has accepted China's apology 
for the assault of soldiers upon a cap- 
tain of the French Legation at Peking. 
Sir William Vernon Harcourt, Liberal 
leader in the British House of Commons. 
died on October 1, aged seventy-seven 
years. 

An assassin recently shot at the Chief 
of Police of Odessa, Russia, and stabbed 
him with a knife in a struggle which 
ensued. 

Advices received at London, Eng., on 
October 1 say that the American mis- 
sionary ship Morning Star arrived at an 
Indian port before September 30. 

Chancellor von Buelow, of Germany, 
recently met Premier Sturdza, of Rou- 
mania, at Hoburg to arrange a commer- 
cial treaty between these countries. 

Heavy losses on both sides are reported 
as the result of recent efforts by the Rus- 
sians to retake certain positions com- 
manding the waterworks at Port Arthur. 
A municipal census has just been 
taken in Buenos Ayres, by which the 
population is estimated at about 1,000,- 
000. The Argentine capital is now the 
largest Spanish-speaking city in the 
world. 

A dispatch received at St. Petersburg 
states that in an assault on Port Arthur 
on September 15, forty- five Russian guns 
were destroyed, 400 men were killed and 
800 wounded, of whom 5 per cent were 
officers. 

The Russian Contraband Commission 
is understood to have resumed its ses 
sions and to have already agreed to rec- 
ommend to the Admiralty that coal be 
included in the category of articles of 
dual use and conditional contraband. 

Advices from Vladivostok say the de- 
fenses around that town have been com- 
pleted, and that everything is prepared 
should the Japanese attempt operations 
on the line of forts and batteries. The 
surrounding forests have been cut down 
in order not to obstruct the zone of fire. 
The French Foreign Office has received 
a report from the French Minister at 
Peking saying that China has given the 
most complete apology and reparation 
for the attack of Chinese soldiers at 
Peking upon Captain Laribe, of the 
French Legation guard on September 19. 
The Captain was insulted and struck 
with a stick, but he was not seriously 
hurt. 

The Russian General Staff has issued 
a revised list of the Russian casualties 
at Liao Yang, showing that 1,810 men 
were killed, 10,811 wounded, and 1,212 
were left on the field. Fifty-four regi- 
mental officers were killed and 252 
wounded, two generals were killed and 
three were wounded. Five officers were 
left on the field. Of those wounded at 
Liao Yang, 1,334 men and thirty-four 
officers have already returned to duty. 
Those reported to be missing are proba- 
bly dead. 

The Austrian Minister of the Interior, 
has issued new regulations to control 
emigration. The local authorities are 
instructed to discourage emigration, but 
when it is impossible to dissuadi 
tending emigrants from leaving the lat- 
ter are to be impressed for the benefit 
of the Cunard line steamers sailing from 
Fiume. The authorities are also directed 
to discover and prosecute the agents of 
other lines which have no concessions 
from the Government if they endeavor 
to divert emigrant traffic. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



Three strikers were recently fined in 
Pittsburg, Pa., for refusing to obey an 
injunction. 

A complete resumption of work at ;>11 
tin' anthracite collieries took place on 
September 2ti. 

Pbe International Elevator Construct- 
ed' Union has decided to raise a defense 
fund of $1,000,000. 

The Central Labor Union, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa., lias appointed a committee 
tu demand recognition for labor from 
the State legislators 

The Dwight cotton mills, of Chicopee, 
Mass., employing 1,800 hands, which 
have been on a four-days-a-\veek schedule 
since April, will shortly be running on 
full time. 

Over 500 miners at Morrisdale, Pa., 
went on strike recently because the com- 
pany required them to push their ear-. 
a condition not imposed by the Altoona 
scale and indignantly refused by the 
miners. 

The American Federation of Labor has 
issued an appeal for financial aid on be 
half of the striking textile workers of 
Fall River, Mass. Contributions arc 
made payable to Albert Ilibbert, box 713. 
Fall River. Mass. 

The Carnegie Steel Company lias in- 
structed its superintendents to employ 
no men over thirty five years of age in 
certain departments, and to extend the 
age limit to forty in others. These rules 
do not apply to laborers. 

Judge Gray, to whom was referred the 
controversy of the anthracite coal min- 
ers on the cluck weighman question, and 
which had previously been adjudicated 
by Carroll D. Wright in favor of the 
miiers, has also decided the issue in the 
same way. 

After an idleness of two weeks the 
plants of Morgan & Wright and the 
.Mechanical Rubber Company, at Chi- 
cago, 111., have been opened without an 
agreement with the Rubber Workers' 
Union. The former contract expired on 
August 31. 

Upon receiving their pay for two 
weeks' work, recently, 100 girls employ- 
ed at the Lansford (Pa.) Silk Mills, 
went on strike, claiming that the rate of 
wages paid them was far lower than ex- 
pected, some beginners averaging as low 

as 20 cents a day. 

Announcement lias been made by a 
steel company employing 1,400 men in 
its plant at Passaic, N. J., of a reduction 
in wages said to average 50 per cent. 
\\ lien the employes were informed, the 
electric cranemen, numbering 500, struck, 

am] were subsequently discharged. 

Judge Owens, of Lcadville, Col., lias 
issued an injunction restraining the Col- 
orado Mjneowners' Association from de 
manding that members of the Westers 
Federation of Miners shall renounce tin 
Union and take out Association cards a- 
a condition of securing employ at. 

Sheriff Edward Bell, of Cripple Creek 
Col., announces that the "confession" of 
Edward Romaine, implicating union min 
ers in t,hc explosions at the Vindicator 
mine and Independence depot, is entirely 
false. Romaine was in La Junta on the 
day of the Independence depot explo- 
sion. 

Through properly accredited commit- 
tees a contract ha- been entered into by 
the Philadelphia theatrical managers and 
Local Union No. 77, of the American 
Federation of Musicians, which prohib- 
its strikes and lockouts for five 
and fixes the terms of work for the 
period. 

About 400 men are out of work at 
Boston, Mass., in consequence of tht 
strike of fourteen engineers and cram 
men employed in contracts on Houston 
harbor by the Eastern Dredging Com 
pany. The trouble may bring the work 
of widening the main ship channel to a 
standstill. 



FOR SALE 
VOLUME XVII 

OF THK 

Coast Seamen's Journal 



BOUND AND INDEXED 



nnipr to unions affiliated with the International Sea- 
rnlUL men's Union of America, or members thereof, 



$2.00 



. . . Apply to . . . 
BUSINESS MANAGER, COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EUREKA, CAL.. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 



First-Class Board and Lodging 

■ Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EVRBKA, CAU. 



The Humboldt Lodging House 

F. BOKOES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE IN 
EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 

BY THE 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

403 FIRST STREET, EUREKA. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City or County on short notice. 

HALTINNER & JOHNSON, Proprietors 



CITY SODA WORKS 

PETER DELANEV, Proprietor. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZK 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

Has Removed to 439 Second St. 

CORNER OF F, 

White Labor Only. EUREKA, CAL. 



THE MODEL 

Union-made Clothing; and a full line 
of M€»n's Wear. 

The Model $3.50 Shoes 

Orders taken for Union Tailor- 
made Suits. 

AUG. GUSTAFSON. 437 Second St. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging, $5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 25c and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. AM)i:i(SOX, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place In town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



WHEN IN PORT CALL AT 

South Bay Hotel 

FIELDS LANDING. 



J. B. BIRD, Proprietor. 



Good Roard and Lodging* by day, week 
or month. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 







From 
Maker to Wearer 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling; goods at less 

than Eastern prices. 

THE BLUE RROINT 

Manufacturers and Retailers 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

S12 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. SEATTLE, WASH. 



Phone Red 1786 

IRA A. CAMPBELL 

PROCTOR IN ADMIRALTY. 

Rooms 210-217 Bailey Building. 

Seattle, Wash. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR EXAMINATION 
NEVER HAD A FAILURE. TERMS MODERATE 

Navigation 

—AND — 

Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. JAS. MARSHALL 

614 First Ave., Seattle Oompagse* Adjusted 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Miss Helen C. Smilh, - - Instructor 

Graduate of Trinity N'utical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
Ball, American and British. 
2226% First Ave. Phone Black 5424. 



Capt. Sorensen's Navigation School 

Established 1899. 
105 PASSED— NO FAILURES 

Room 59, . . Safe Deposit Building 

First Avenue, foot of Cherry Street, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



WHEN IN PORT 

Trade with the Old Reliable 

SAWTELLE STORE 

— Dealer in — 

PURE GUM BOOTS, CANVAS 

HOOTS. LLAMAS AND OILSKINS. 

In fact everything appertaining to 

Seamen's Outfits. 



■ Just aiUUDd 
the comer 
from 
I Union Office . 



' SAWTELLE BUILDING 



EUREKA 



O'CONNOR'S CICARS 

1 in popular favorites. Equal in flav- 
or and aroma to cigars of twice their 
cost. They are made by union men, 
therefore always reliable and in good 
condition. Best value ever known. 

C. O'CONNOR 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

r.:i2 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



EXPRESS NO. 101 

Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

F. F. JOHNSON. 

Phone Hood 350. PORTLAND, OR. 



Headquarters for Seanien. 



NEW YORK LODGING HOUSE 

Albert Haller, Prop. 

Newly Furnished Rooros. Entirely Remodeled 

Prices Moderate. Phone Hood 352. 

203 BURNSIDE STREET. 

Cor. Front, near First PORTLAND, OR 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Thomas McPherson's Cigar Store 

86 West Mnln Street, Seattle, U nsh.. 

Abreast of P. C. S. Co.'s Dock. 

ALL KINDS OF 

Union-made Cigars and Tobaccos on 

Hand. 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. H ABERE R, PROP. 

161 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE 

Carries a full line of Cigars, Tobaccos 

und Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone Ind. 118. 




CLOTHING HOUS£ 

Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Boots, Shies 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

All Union Made Goods 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



BONNEY & STEWART 
UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing: bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



John Mullen, who was employed as 
fireman on the steamer Ventura some 
two and one-half years ago, is requested 
to communicate with his wife at 69 
Civile St., Anderston, Glasgow. 

C. Roach, who left the British ship 
Lynton at San Francisco in February, 
1900, is requested to communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Mary Roach, 4 Queen 
St., Queenstown, Ireland. 

John McGovern (alias John Wilson), 
last heard of in Xew York March, 1902, 
when on board the S. S. Calburga, is 
inquired for by his mother at Belfast, 
Ireland. Anyone knowing his present 
whereabouts will please notify the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



LB 



u 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. H UTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Pine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

S:m Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



LETTER LIST. 



(Continued from page 13.) 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Adams. Walter 
Allen, Frans 
Andersson, A. A. 
Andersson, J. 
Arcadius, Ture 
Arntsen, Erik 
Beese, Henry 
Carroll, R. 
Cederstrom, Wm. 
Christiansen-851 
Clough, H. R. 
Currie, James 
Donovan, John 
Erikson, Aleck 
Fogarty, J. P. 
Friedrickson, A. 
Gilhooly, H. 
Glouaguen 
Gustafson, Aksel 
Hansen, Edward 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, H. 



Jensen, Chas. 
Johansson, Knut 
Johnson, Maune 
Klein, T. 
Klemettila, G. 
Knutzer, Charles 
Kunigk, A. 
Labastide, Joe 
Larsen, L. J. 
Legallais, Jules 
Lie, Carl 

Lindstam, Olof A. 
Lundberg. K. H. 
Moen, K. E. 
Nielsen, N. 
Peterson, Charles 
Samuelsen, Krist 
Schilling, Carl 
Weber, C. O. 
Wickstram, Anton 
Williams, Chas. 



Letters in the Oilice of the Fishermen'i 

Union of the Pacific Coast 

and Alaska. 



Andresen, Thoralf 
Annus, John 
Bonde, Ths. 
Dahl, Ben 
Eliasen, Edv. Nik. 



Jacobsen, C. E. 
Nelsen, John 
Nelson, Peter 
Tishel, Mathias 



INFORMATION WANTED 



John A. Connelly, recently on the 
steamer Siberia, is inquired for by his 
sister, who has some important news for 
him. Address, Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

James Murphy, a fireman, who left the 
steamer Robert Dollar last June, is re- 
quested to call at the United States 
Shipping Commissioner's office in San 
Francisco. 

Martin Zentawer, native of Germany, 
aged 55, last heard from in 1891, on 
American bark "Guardian," is inquired 
for by the German Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

John Butler and Thos. Grady, who 
were employed on the steamer D. C. 
Whitney, on the Lakes, in 1901, are in- 
quired for by Captain T. J. Carney, 511 
Fifth St., Detroit, Mich. 

James Lennox, a native of Woolwitch, 
England, aged about 50, last heard of 
about twelve years ago in London, Eng- 
land, is inquired for by .his brother, 
William Lennox. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Anton Iversen, last heard of as hav- 
ing joined the American barkentine Au- 
rora, in Sydney, N. S. W., in 1902, is 
inquired for by his brother, Edward 
Iversen. Address, Steamboatmen's 

Union, Vancouver, B. C. 

G. L. Jensen, who sailed from San 
Francisco about January 12 last on the 
schooner Emma Utter and discharged on 
arrival at Gray's Harbor, is requested 
to call at the United States Shipping 
Commissioner's office at San Francisco. 

Oscar Sander, aged 15, dark hair, 
brown eyes ; left the Orphans' Home at 
Los Angeles several years ago to ship as 
cabin boy in a vessel at San Pedro, Cal., 
is inquired for. Anyone knowing his 
present whereabouts will please notify 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Information regarding . the wherea- 
bouts of Fricdrich Wilhelm Budde, born 
at Coeln-Deutz, April 1, 1868, who left 
Germany twenty years ago as a cabin 
boy, and last wrote to his relatives from 
Santa Barbara, Cal., in 1891, is respect- 
fully requested. German Consulate, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Francis Anderson, age 41, steward, of 
Liverpool, said to have been on the 
steamer Haytien Republic, in January, 
1893; Pat. Matthews, discharged from 
steamer Algoa, February 24 last; John 
Ritchie, boy, seen at Sailors' Union office 
December 15 last, and John King, who 
left the British ship Dumfriesshire last 
August. The above-named are wanted 
by friends in England and Ireland. Ap- 
ply to British Consul, 520 Battery St., 
San Francisco. 



California Undertaking Co. 

Private Residence Parlors 

R. J DEVLIN, MANAOCM 

W. L, LintoacY, Secretary 
CORNER POST 405 POWELL ST 

• AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 

• RCN SAY AND MIHT TELEPHONE MAIN #T1 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall. 

We Sell the Kind of Goods You Require. 



EXTRA STRONG HICKORY SHIRTS } 
BEST OVERALLS ! 

GOOD LUMBER SHOES ( 

STOCKTON FLANNEL UNDERWEAR ) 



UNION LABEL 



ALSO A FULL LINE OF GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS. 
Look at our Goods. You will be pleased. No trouble to show them. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

Of California. 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $3,000,000.00 

PAID UP CAPITAL AND RESERVE $1,725,000.00 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or Trustee. 

Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court pro- 
ceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully 
selectr-d. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, President. Horace H. Hill, Vice-President. H. Brunner, Cashier. 




A. ANDERSON, 



The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Corner Drumm and Commercial Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone James 4846 

A new building erected especially for 
sailors. Latest improvements, clean and 
light rooms, bath, reading and dining 
rooms. First class board and lodging at 
reasonable rates. Gospel service — Sun- 
days, 3:45 p. m., and Wednesdays, 8 
o'clock p. m. All welcome. 

Missionary and manager 



UNION STORE 

K)R UNION SAILORS 
AND FISHERMEN 

By making cash sales only we are 
enabled to sell at the lowest figure. 



STABENS 4 FRIEDMAN 

CLOTHIERS AND OUTFITTERS 

257-259 Pacifio St. 

Between Battery and Front, San Francisco 



JOE HARRIS 

Sea-faring . Men's . Outfitter 

Ready Made Uniforms. 
Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., near EAST 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



H. WARRINGTON 

SAILORS' FURNISHING GOODS 

Union-made Shoes, Hats, Caps, Under- 
wear, Tobacco, etc. 



You'll find everything strictly first class. 

711 Davis Street, near Broadway. 

(Opposite Pier ».) 



GREENS UNION STORE 

H CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALU WITH THE UNION LABEL. 

We give you a square deal. 



THE SUTTER 

Furnished Rooms 
At Reasonable Rates 

106 Stewart St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

wm. stadt, Proprietor. 



EXPRESSING 

— Done by — 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Cor. East and Mission Sts. 



iiors Ooifidino store 



J. GOODMAN 

110 Berry St., San Francisco 

The Best Goods In the Market. 



M. A. MAHER 

Men's - Furnishing - Goods 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Workingmen's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 



200 EAST STREET, NEAR HOWARD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



The Monogram Cigar Store 

All kinds of Union-made Cigars, Cigar- 
ettes and Tobacco. 

150 EAST STREET, COR. HOWARD. 

GUS HOLMGREN, Proprietor. 
Agent for the Steam Laundry. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH - SIDE - HOTEL 

800 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and King Streets. 



The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and lodging, $5 per week. All 
rooms single. 



FRANK JOHNSON 
SAN PEDRO HOTEL 

6 HOWARD STREET, S. F. 



Newly furnished. Large and airy 
rooms by the day, week or month, at 
reasonable rates. 

FIVE MEAL TICKETS, $1. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Andrew J. Stewart, a native of Maine; 
was sailing on the Coast two years ago; 
is inquired for by relatives. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The schooner Addie Jordan, before re- 
ported sunk at Florence, N. J., has been 
sold to F. Cramer for $600. 

The schooner Ella G. Eels, of 230 tons, 
has been sold to Captain Breen, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., for the general coast- 
ing trade. 

The schooner William L. Douglas, 
which was aground just above Schooner 
Ledge, floated recently and proceeded on 
her way to Providence, R. I. 

The schooner Henry P. Havens, which 
stranded at Lewes, Del., during the re- 
cent hurricane, was floated recently with 
the assistance of the tugs Juno and Asher 
J. Hudson. 

Captain Boeman and ten members of 
the crew of the bark James E. Wright 
arrived at Philadelphia, Pa., recently. 
The bark went ashore and was burned at 
Harbor Island. 

The Norwegian steamer Britannic, 
from Quebec for Sydney, C. B., and the 
schooner Maria Stella, collided in the 
harbor of Quebec recently. The schooner 
was badly damaged. The steamer es- 
caped injury. 

The work of removing the wreck of the 
steamer Kiowa from Boston harbor is 
progressing, and in a few weeks every 
vestige will be gone. Her decks have 
been blown up by dynamite, and about 
50,000 feet of lumber secured. 

The falling off in the demand for ship- 
building in Baltimore has caused the 
Baltimore Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company, of which J. Quitman Lovell 
is President, to go into the hands of re- 
ceivers. Archibald Taylor and Walter 
Ancker have been appointed in that ca- 
pacity. 

The Harwich (Mass.) schooner Elvira 
J. French was wrecked off the Jersey 
coast in a recent gale, with the loss of 
seven members of the crew of nine. Nel- 
son and Shulz, the engineer and one of 
the crew, clung to one of the pieces of 
the wreck for four days and nights, be- 
ing picked up by a schooner and landed 
in Norfolk, Va. 

The fourth of the five lightships being 
built by the New York Shipbuilding 
Company designed for Government serv- 
ice on the Atlantic Coast was launched 
recently without any ceremony. The 
vessel is 113 feet long, 28 feet 6 inches 
beam and 22 feet depth of hold. The 
remaining lightship will be launched in 
about two weeks. 

The steamer Arctic, commanded by 
Captain Bernier, with the Canadian ex- 
pedition under Major Moodie, sailed from 
Sydney, C. B., on September 22 for Hud- 
son Bay and the North. The party will 
remain three years. Captain Bernier 
expects to make an attempt to reach the 
North Pole in the Arctic after complet- 
ing the present trip. 

A dispatch received at North Sydney, 
C. B., recently, announced that the brig- 
antine Amy Louise, which sailed from 
that port for Green Point, N. F., is 
ashore at Safe Harbor, N. F. The crew 
were taken off, but the vessel became a 
total loss. She was laden with coal for 
a factory at Green Point. The Amy 
Louise was of 177 tons. 

The steamer Pathfinder arrived at 
New York on September 13 from Norfolk 
with the derelict British schooner Theta 
in tow. The Pathfinder picked up the 
derelict near the Five Fathom Bank 
lightship. The Theta's sails were set, 
and she evidently had been abandoned 
hastily after being in collision. The fate 
of her crew is unknown. 

A general order has been issued at 
the Navy Department that greatly sim- 
plifies the method of contracting with 
the railroad companies for the trans- 
portation of officers and men. It is one 
of several moves recently made by Sec- 
retary of the Navy Morton to cut out 
some of the red tape which clogs the 
wheels of the Departmental machinery. 



id 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



"With the Wits. 



Prejudiced. — "What! You dont 
prove' of free schools?" 
"No; I favor hire education." 



ap 



Right About. — "What's the news from 
the front?" asked the first citizen of St. 
Petersburg. 

"That our front is now where the reai 
replied the Becond, dolefully. 



Proper Enough. — "I don't know what 
right she has to advertise herself as a 
piii less actress.' " 

"Well, she explains that by Btating 
that she's never had any of these Brit- 
ish peers chasing around after her." 



It Has to Be Used. — "My wife's going 

to let mi' smoke in the house hereafter," 
said Henpeck. 
"Vmi don't Bay? Why, how is that?" 

"She saw a real nice ash receiver at 
a bargain sale and she couldn't resist 
the temptation to buy it." 



A Long Line. — "Young Bragley is our 
sporting editor now." said Spaceryte, of 

the Howler. "Succeeded his father, you 
know." 

"Seem- to run in i he family, eh ?" 

"<)h. yes! Why, Braglej claims that 
one 'i hi- ancestors was sporting editor 
of Addison's Spectator." 



A Do! tie i- Nothing. -"Of course, you 
always take a bottle with you on a fish- 
ing trip?" said t he Northern visitor. 

"A bottle, suh?" demanded the Ken 
tuckian. "What fob. sub'.'" 

"Ob, come now ! You don't mean to 
Bay you'd l'o fishing without whisky — " 

"We take a jug, sub." 



I' f Enough. — Victim — "You -old 

me that as a 'burglar-proof' safe." 

Dealer— "Well?" 

Victim — "Well, this morning I found 
it cracked open and rifled of all it- eon 
tents." 

Dealer — "What mole do you want? 

Isn't that proof that burglars have been 

at it?" 



Bald and Beardless. — "Yes," said the 

barber, "old men and boys are easily 
Mattered." 

"Yes?" queried the occupant of the 
chair. 

"Yes; you can usually flatter an old 
man by asking him if be wants a hair- 
on. and a boy by asking if he wants a 
shave." 



LUNDSTROM»S 



DNION 
MADE 



$2.50 HATS 



PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

I !.".-> Market Street, opposite Central 
Theater, and 005 Kearny .Street. 



Country Orders solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
Club 




Every Package bears 
the Union Label 



Union made 

Clothing 



ISSUED BYADTHORITYIF 





abk 



t-n 



We were one of the first firms in the 
United States to put the union label on our 
garments. As we manufacture our own 
stock, all our clothes bear the union label. 

Other stores in San Francisco have a few union-made lines 
to show union men. 
Every thing is union made in our establishment. 
In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a 
saving of middlemen's profits. 

Ready-made suits and overcoats from gio.oo to $35.00 
Made-to-measure clothes from $10.00 to $45 00. 




S. IN. WOOD <& CO, 

740 Market St., San Francisco. 

mMmmmmmmmmsBum 




Jf. Sorcns»n, 

r. antt Z*r«as. 



James A* Sorensen Co* 

Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 

103 to 1 1 1 SIXTH STREET, Below Mission 

TELEPHONE JESSIE 2821 SAN FRANCISCO 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for two years. Eyes Tested 
Free by an expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

The Big Jewelry Store 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light blue) 
appears on the box from which you 
are served. 



Issued by Autiuxily of Uie Cigar MaKers International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

3to (fntifirt. ii«mcv»«»a^»t)fatatMtwM**ar&ua!mra& 

i«mBa>0! iHcocjinurtio'iouiuiioiniuniM* u,ru ^cru«»«"OcvoteoroiVid 
wnrtawl if rV MOMlJUTOKlJml mTtlUmulMlUItt OF TXt Cfl«rf Unfmnnuutt 



K»ialbt« 



laccoCqtolv 



V C.M..I.U., 



C.M..l.V*fA 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

Smoke Union -Made Cigars that Bear the 
Above Label 



(Otherwise known as .SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between iKng and Berry Sts., Sun Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods. Hats, Caps. Trunks. Valises. Bags, etc., Boots, 
Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly UNION 
MADS. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the lowest market prices give me a call. 
Do not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylors Nautical School 




506 



Opposite 

U. S. Custom Houst 



BATTERY STREET 

COR. WASHINGTON STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest and best 
equipped private Nautical School In the Cnited States, 
Graduates prepared for the American and British 
Merchant Marine examinations. Warrant offlcere of 
the United States Navy prepared for examination for 
commissioned officers. Special course for cadets en- 
tering the United States Naval Academy and Ameri- 
can Merchant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a text book and guide 
for navigators, Is now on sale at the school. Prospect- 
ive purchasers, or those Interested in navigation may 
call at the school and inspect them. The book is well 
bound, contains about 400 pages of readable matter. 
F*RIOBC $6.00 



At Hale's 

Extra Advantages this Week 

In Overshirts <,oc: 

They're made of heavy black sat- 
een, double stitched for double 
strength throughout, felled 
seams. And they're made double 
on the shoulders, where the most 
wear comes. Extension neck- 
hand, pearl buttons, one pocket; 
made very full, .:fi inches long. 
We will warrant the color fast. 
Every size at 50c, though they 
are 75e. ordinarily. 

In Underwear $1.2$: 

For regular $1.50 garments. Jer- 
sey ribbed, form fitting, made 
with a French neck, stitched 
witli silk, faced with heavy sat- 
een. Come in pink, blue and 
natural gray. All sizes. $1.26 
garment. 



^ 



Ze f 4 



San Francisco's 

8-Hour Good Goods Store 

Market St., Near Sixth 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

.Snlloi-H' and Firemen - * Clothing 

and (.e lie nil Supplies. 



COLBY & FITZPATRICK 

lT'/i Stem** Street, 

Bet Market t V Mission, - Sun Kruncisco 



...SMOKE... 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNIONJVIADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY STREET. 



"LA CORTINA" 

CLEAR UNION MADE HAVANA 

MASCOT) Best 5 cent 
BLUE CAP] Cigars 

FACTORY, 111 TURK STREET 



STILL ON DECK 



ED. ANDERSEN 



7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY 

LUMBER HOOKS 



Scotty's Milwaukee 
Sweaters and Jackets 

Have stood the test against all competitors 

LakC Faring Men AH Know It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
HAIL I U R 9 3.30 
Beware of lniltntlonM 

WILLIAM LISLE 

••scorrv" 
III MEN0MENEE ST., MILWAUKEE. WIS. 



_ 



r« 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea.- Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XVIII. No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1901. 



Whole No. 887. 



A FRIEND'S UNFOUNDED FEARS. 



Morality of Trade-Unions Still Maintained. 

President Gompers Replies to Jane Addams. 



THE head of Hull House, the leading- 
social settlement of Chicago and of the 
United States, Miss Jane Addams, has 
contributed an article to the North American 
Review, on "The Present Crisis in Trade- 
Union Morals." Miss Addams is one of or- 
ganized labor's sincerest and staunchest 
friends, and anything she says upon the sub- 
ject of unionism — its principles, methods, 
objects, activities — is worthy of careful and 
sympathetic consideration. 

There is much in the article which is very 
complimentary to the labor movement, and 
the highest compliments are unconscious. 
Miss Addams expects much from organized 
and federated labor; her standards of con- 
duct and character, with reference to labor, 
are high indeed. 

Thus, declaring that "there is undoubted 
evidence that many unions are suffering from 
the present low standard of public morality, 
and share the more brutal doctrine of com- 
mercialism which makes a man resolve 'to 
get there,' despite obstacles from without or 
scruples from within," Miss Addams says: 

It is indeed told comfort to say that the methods 
of labor organizations are "no worse" than the meth- 
ods adopted by certain organizations of capital. If 
a small body of men become so absolutely engrossed 
in making money that they disregard public rights, 
that they bribe and browbeat railroads from the 
function of common carriers to that of grantors of 
favored rates — that is certainly deplorable; but, after 
all, not so deplorable as when a large body of work- 
ingmen disregard public rights and involve the honor 
and moral standard of many of their fellows. 

That is true ; but fortunately for labor and 
society there is no evidence whatever that 
large bodies of workingmen do, as a matter 
of fact, disregard public rights. Large 
bodies of men strike noAv and then, but 
surely Miss Addams docs not hold that to 
strike is to disregard public rights. In other 
parts of the article Miss Addams speak- 



violence and disorder in strikes and the cor- 
ruption in the unions, but she knows, and 
would be first to testify, that never have 
either large or small bodies of workingmen 
approved or condoned these things. Mistakes 
have been made in the labor movement, as in 
any great movement the world has ever seen, 
but they have been in most cases mistakes 
of the head, not of the heart. 

This brings us to the question suggested 
by the title of Miss Addams' article. Is 
there a crisis in trade-union morals ? There 
are no facts in the article to show that there 
is such a crisis, that the labor movement has 
descended to a lower plane in the last few 
years, or that there has been a change for 
the worse in the methods or personnel of 
the unions and their leaders. 

We have said before, and we repeat now, 
that political, social, and industrial move- 
ments should in fairness be judged by their 
best, uot by their worst aspects and represent- 
atives. Trade-union morality is higher than 
business morality or political morality, when 
properly and justly viewed, as Miss Addams 
should know. 

Take the one fact of sympathetic strikes, 
which have their justification in the princi- 
ple of solidarity, in the truth that an injury 
to one is the concern of all. How much loy- 
alty, self-sacrifice, fellowship, these strikes 
require! Commercialism talks a good deal 
about "enlightened selfishness." The selfish- 
ness we see on every side, but the enlighten- 
ment is very scarce. The loyalty constantly 
shown by organized labor argues not only 
enlightened self-interest, but generosity and 
sympathy. What movement of equal magni- 
tude is morally higher than the trade-union 
and labor movement? Compare it with party 
politics, with international diplomacy, with 
anything you please; it will stand the tost. 



Miss Addams herself recognizes that not 
the "higher classes," but the masses of "un- 
trained" workingmen are "intrusted with the 
difficult task of industrial amelioration and 
adjustment," and that the unions, "which are 
the organized expression of that effort, are 
the most significant organizations in our 
midst." We venture to say that there is no 
crisis in the morals of these "most significant 
organizations," and. that whatever crisis there 
is, is in the morals of society as a Avhole. 

But Miss Addams expresses the fear that 
the idealism of the unions is incompatible 
with, and endangered by, the necessity of 
"practical and businesslike" methods. Em- 
ployers complain that workmen are unreason- 
able and under the dominion of sentiment 
and dogma, and the question put by Miss 
Addams is whether in adopting business 
principles the unions are not sacrificing, and 
necessarily, their early idealism. 

We do not think that this must follow. To 
make contracts and stick to them, even when 
they limit or take away the right of striking- 
out of sympathy, is not to sacrifice idealism. 
To consult actual conditions and the dictates 
of reasonable expediency before striking or 
making demands upon employers is not to 
abandon any ideal ever proposed by intelli- 
gent unionists. 

The "idealism" of the labor raovemenl 
consists primarily in this, that the organized 
workmen in striking to better their own con 
dit ion and to secure for themselves mora 
equitable treatment are really battling lor 
social and industrial progress. 

When the workers raise the standard of 
living they raise it for all. 

When the unions reduce the hours of toil 
or increase pay they accomplish these bei 
cent results, not for any class, but for all 
classes. 

The strike-breaker, the "scab," the n 

who is too [gnoranl or loo jen He, or too 
selfish to join a union, reaps the benefil of an 
organization he does his worst lo undermine. 

Society needs justice, a fairer system of 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



distribution greater opportunity, freedom 
and leisure for its workers. 

The unions are doing the work of society ; 
in Miss Addams' words they are intrusted 
with the task of social amelioration. Their 
methods must be governed by circumstances, 
but no method which really promotes the wel- 
fare of union labor can possibly injure any 
other class. 

In the controversy over the "Closed Shop" 
— we arc glad to see that .Miss Addams pre- 
fers the term "Contract Shop," one being 
much fairer and more accurate, though for 
this very reason it does not suit the pluto- 
cratic press and hypocritical element among 
the employers — we can argue with Miss Ad- 
dams that the employers appeal to "ethical 
standards," while labor makes a businesslike 
proposition pure and simple. 

The union shop proposition is not only 
businesslike, but it is also moral. 

The employers who denounce it as a vio- 
lation of the workman's freedom and the 
principles of equal opportunity are either in- 
sincere or superficial. 

The union shop rests on the freedom of 
contract, or individual liberty. There is no 
greater element of "monopoly" in it than 
in any other contract for services or mate- 
rials. If you give work to A, you can not 
give the same work to B. Has B any griev- 
ance ? Would it not be ridiculous for him 
to object to the contract in the name of equal- 
ity? 

The opposition to the union shop is simply 
opposition to collective bargaining, and Miss 
Addams herself says that it is difficult to 
understand why business men have been so 
reluctant to concede to unions the right of 
collective bargaining. 

Collective bargaining implies collective re- 
sponsibility, and responsibility means the 
union or "contract" shop. 

How can union men undertake to control 
the work and conduct of outsiders ? 

There is no blow at idealism in the union 
shop. There would be if the unions were 
close corporations, monopolies, aristocracies. 
But are they not working day and night to 
extend their influence to convert new men, 
to organize all their fellows ? 

With all respect to Miss Addams, there is 
no "crisis in trade-union morals." The labor 
movement, like all other things, adapts itself 
to changing conditions ; but in all essentials 
it is as idealistic to-day as it ever was. It is 
more practical because of the experience ac- 
quired, but "practical" is not interchange- 
able with "corrupt" or "immoral" or "nai*- 
rowly selfish." — American Federationist. 



Behr, the inventor of the monorail railway, 
that has proved a success on the continent 
of Europe, is trying to induce London to 
adopt it. It is much less costly than the dou- 
ble-rail system, and he says he can arrange 
to run it at the backs of houses, instead of 
along the street. 



The other day an Australian who had 
fought in South Africa received from the 
British War Office notice that he had been 
overpaid $2.75, with a request that he return 
the money forthwith. He says he will not, 
and dares the War Office to do its worst. 



The Swedish People. 



From whatever point of view one consid- 
ers the social organization of the Swedish 
town, it is seen that it is directed toward the 
increase of the general good, although it 
should be said that the State enters but little 
into the civil life and leaves a large place 
for individual initiative. Another promi- 
nent fact about the Swedish life is the large 
part which women take in it. Idleness being 
considered dishonorable in Sweden, the wom- 
en have entered all of the Government depart- 
ments in which the work has been made 
agreeable and easy for them. Every day be- 
tween the hoiirs of 3 and 5 o'clock the offices 
are closed, in order that the women may visit 
their homes or do whatever they may wish. 

It is necessary to have lived some time in 
Sweden to have gained an idea of the ex- 
treme honesty of the country. Thefts are 
rare, crimes still more so. The majority of 
.the stores of Stockholm merely close their 
doors at night, the most precious stock being 
protected only by a sheet of glass. In fact, 
the policeman is merely an ornament. In 
the theaters a large room open to all is used 
as a cloakroom. Here everyone leaves his 
things without in any way guarding them, 
and there is never a loss. It is needless to 
say that this feeling of mutual confidence 
makes the spirit of the country a very delight- 
ful one. One of the most distinctive char- 
acteristics of the Scandinavian spirit from 
time immemorial has been the respect for 
women, and the most constant form of the 
feminine spirit has been the love of battle 
and the desire to obtain the same rights as 
man. While the woman of the south has 
dominated by her charms, the woman of the 
north has ruled by her force. 

The woman of to-day has kept the same 
love of physical exercise and the same thirst 
for independence, in the majority of schools 
the boys and girls being placed together, and 
at the age of ten young girls go out alone and 
have every liberty. There is no country where 
the woman who is obliged to earn her living 
is better cared for than in Sweden. All posi- 
tions are open to her. She may be a phy- 
sician, professor, journalist, manufacturer, 
employe in the Government offices, etc., with- 
out losing her feminine position in the world. 
The first transportation company of Stock- 
holm was founded and directed with success 
by a woman, many printing shops employ 
only women, and in literature the head of 
the idealistic school is Miss Selma Lagerlof, 
and her most bitter antagonist is Miss Ellen 
Kay. The consequence of all this has been 
a scorn of marriage and an increase in the 
number of women who live alone. 

In order to know the Swedish family well 
one must live some time in one of those great 
domains called the "Gard," which are found 
in the heart of Sweden, and in which many 
ancient customs are still preserved. The ex- 
tent of these domains is wide, in some cases 
between 17,000 and 20,000 acres, although 
the actual cost of the property is not very 
great. The proprietor of these estates must 
lodge his farmers and maintain all buildings, 
and he is also responsible for all the roads 
which traverse his land. There is also a 
very great moral responsibility, the proprie- 
tor being the spiritual father as well as the 



master of these people, who in many instances 
number 500 persons. — -lane Michanx, in Re- 
vue de Paris. 



Public Service of Railways. 



The number of passengers reported as car- 
ried by the railways of the United States 
in the year ending June 30, 1903, was 694,- 
891,535, indicating an increase of 45,013,- 
030 as compared with the year ending June 
30, 1902. The passenger mileage, or the 
number of passengers carried one mile, was 
20,915,763,881, having increased 1,225,- 
826,261. 

The number of tons of freight reported 
as carried (including freight received from 
connecting roads and other carriers') was 
1.304,394,323, which exceeds the tonnage of 
the previous year by 104,078,536 tons. The 
ton mileage, or the number of tons carried 
one mile, was 173,222,278,993, the increase 
being 15,932,908,940. The number of tons 
carried one mile per mile of line was 855,- 
447, which figures indicate an increase in 
the density of freight traffic of 62,096 ton 
miles per mile of line. 

The average revenue per passenger per 
mile for the year mentioned was 2.006 cents, 
the average for the preceding year being 
1.986 cents. The average revenue per ton 
per mile was 0.763 cent. This average for 
the preceding year was 0.757 cent. Earn- 
ings per train mile show an increase both 
for passenger and freight trains. The aver- 
age cost of running a train one mile appears 
to have increased between 8 and 9 cents. 
The ratio of operating expenses to earnings, 
66.16 per cent, also increased in comparison 
with the preceding year, when it was 64.66 
per cent. 

A summary of freight traffic, classified on 
the basis of a commodity classification em- 
bracing some thirty-eight items, is continued 
for the year under review. — Report of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 



Fecundity of Fish. 



In a chapter on the artificial cultivation 
of sea fish, contributed by R. B. Marston to 
Afialo's British Salt Water Fishes, it is 
stated that there need be no fear that such 
important fish as the cod and the herring 
can ever become extinct or even reduced in 
numbers by man, except locally. A cod of 
ten pounds has a million eggs. On July 26, 
1895, Professor Hensen calculated that there 
must be over 278,000,000,000 of impregnat- 
ed cod eggs in each square Norwegian geo- 
graphical mile of the surface of the Skager- 
rak. Consequently the 300,000,000 or 400,- 
000,000 of eggs artificially hatched and turn- 
ed in annually from a Norwegian hatchery 
are only a drop in the ocean. 

In America, however, codfish culture has 
had beneficial results in establishing lucra- 
tive fisheries in inshore waters of New Eng- 
land that had been entirely depleted or had 
not contained any great stock of them pre- 
vious to the operations of the Fish Commis- 
sion. Still more splendid have been the re- 
sults from the culture of shad, once a luxury 
obtainable only by a few, but now plentiful 
and comparatively cheap. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







On the Atlantic Coast. : 

(Contributed by tbe Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



Pendleton "TalKs Shop." 



Fields S. Pendleton, President of the At- 
lantic Carriers' Association, and probably 
the largest individual shipowner in the coun- 
try, declares in a statement published in the 
New York Herald that he is opposed to ship 
subsidies and in favor of discriminating — 
that is, preferential — duties on goods brought 
to the United States in American bottoms. 
Incidentally Mr. Pendleton bestows a few 
encomiums upon the Democratic party, em- 
phatically asserting that the Democrats are, 
and always have been, the best friends of 
American shipping interests. Referring to 
ship subsidies, he says: 

The Ship Subsidy bill, exempting, as it does, all 
vessels of less than one thousand tons register, will 
work for the sole benefit of the owners of large ves- 
sels, who are also large contributors to the Republi- 
can campaign fund. This country had a preferential 
tariff rate on goods brought here in American ships 
from 1798 to 1828, and at that time our flag could 
be seen flying in every seaport in the world. 

The gentleman further intimates that 
many Republicans secretly favor preferential 
bottom duties but openly advocate ship sub- 
sidies because of the large campaign contri- 
butions from those vesselowners whom sub- 
sidies would mostly benefit. Then, warming 
up to the subject nearest his heart, Mr. Pen 
dleton goes on, as follows : 

By the preferential rate a reduction of tariff is 
made on all goods brought to this country in Ameri- 
can built and owned vessels. The result of this 
policy would be that importers would insist, or would 
be forced, to have their goods brought here under our 
flag. It would create a demand for American ves- 
sels; the shipyards would be busy, and there would 
be employment for every American sailor under his 
own flag. One of the results would be that the 
$70,000,000 worth of products brought to this country 
annually from Brazil, for instance, would be brought 
in American vessels. The greater part of this now 
comes in British bottoms, the boats taking what is 
known as the triangular route. From Liverpool they 
carry manufactured goods to Brazil ; from Brazil 
they bring coffee to America, and from here they 
take grain back to England. Last year Brazil sent 
us $70,000,000 worth of goods, and we sent to that 
country only $15,000,000. If by a preferential tariff 
the products from Brazil were brought to this coun- 
try on American vessels, those vessels would make 
so low a return freight rate, rather than go back in 
ballast, that our manufactured articles would find a 
market in that country, which is now buying almost 
exclusively from England. 

For the owners of large steamships like those of 
the American line the ship subsidy is a good thing. 
It enables them to collect passage money from the 
passengers, and then taxes the small owner to collect 
a subsidy from the Government. For the small own- 
ers, the men who have blisters on their hands and 
vvho risk their lives in their efforts to eke out a 
living on the sea, the discriminating^ or preferential 
tariff that was advocated by the Democratic mem- 
bers of the Merchant Marine and Fisheries Commit- 
tee of the House of Representatives is a much better 
plan. By the Ship Subsidy plan an effort is made to 
build up the shipping industry by taxing all the peo- 
ple, the poor shipowner who gets no benefits along 
with the rest. Under that measure only thirty-seven 
of the 537 shipowners of this country would be bene- 
fited. Outside of the owners of the large passenger 
steamers there is not a shipowner in America who 
does not believe that the shipbuilding industry would 
receive a greater impetus by a discriminating or 
preferential tariff. Under that plan every shipowner 
would receive a benefit. It would hold out a helping 
hand to the poor owners, not by imposing a burden 
upon the people, but by reducing the tariff on the 
goods brought to this country in American vessels, 



which reduces the price to the consumer. It would 
give us the carrying trade of every country not inter- 
ested in the shipping business, at least. It would 
give us the carrying of the 2,200,000 tons of freight 
brought from Cuba last year, and all the freight 
from the South and Central American ports. It 
would create a demand for American ships which 
would make shipbuilding one of our greatest indus- 
tries, and it would be an encouragement to the com- 
mon sailor, who in the time of war has been the 
reserve for the navy. 

Mr. Pendleton's views on the subject he 
discusses are more than ordinarily interest- 
ing from the fact that, in a way, he repre- 
sents that large class of American shipowners 
whom he so feelingly alludes to as having 
"blisters on their hands," presumably acquir- 
ed while "risking their lives in their efforts 
to eke out a living on the sea," etc. His 
attitude toward the Ship Subsidy measure is 
easily understood when it is known that al- 
though he is the owner or part owner of more 
than one hundred vessels, not one of which 
is large enough to derive any benefit what- 
ever from that measure should it become 
law. That preferential duties on goods 
brought to this country in American bottoms 
should commend itself to Mr. Pendleton as 
the better plan is therefore only natural; 
and although one may disagree with him on 
minor points, it must be admitted that on 
the whole he has made out a fairly good case 
against direct ship subsidies. The word "di- 
rect" is used here merely to emphasize the 
fact that discriminating bottom duties in 
favor of our own ships are, after all has 
been said, simply indirect subsidies. How- 
ever, human nature is such that, to quote 
William Pitt, you may tax the shirt off a 
man's back so long as you do it indirectly. 

It will be noted from Mr. Pendleton's 
views, as published in the Herald, that he 
is not above that common weakness of promi- 
nent men who talk for publication, to wit, 
the "climax;" for he concludes his more or 
less pertinent remarks on a preferential 
tariff, etc., with the somewhat farfetched 
assumption that "it would be an encourage- 
ment to the common sailor, who in the time 
of war has been the reserve for the navy." 
This supplies the needed touch of patriotism 
to an otherwise strictly business oration, and 
is therefore most appropriately reserved for 
the wind-up. Earlier in the interview he 
also tells us that if his plan for building up 
the merchant marine were adopted "there 
would be employment for every American 
sailor under his own flag." These statements 
would be important, if true; but it is not 
easy to understand how subsidies or a prefer- 
ential tariff in favor of shipowners would 
alter the conditions under which American 
seamen now have to make their living. Mr. 
Pendleton does not advocate the abolition of 
imprisonment for desertion or the allotment 
evil, or any other legalized evil from which 
seamen at present suffer. So long as these 
evils prevail American seamen will not de- 
rive much "encouragement," etc., nor will 
they be eager to seek "employment under 
their own flag." 

In fact, the sincerity of Mr. Pendleton on 



this point may be justly doubted. As Presi- 
dent of the Atlantic Carriers' Association he 
has shown himself anything but a friend of 
the "common sailor," for whose material 
welfare he has now so suddenly become so- 
licitous. He has done his level best to reduce 
the going wages of seamen, and has taken 
every advantage of the law to restrict their 
personal liberties and to deprive them of con- 
ditional privileges. As an individual ship- 
owner his record is even worse. Time and 
again crews have backed out of his vessels 
because of the smallness and filthy condition 
of their forecastles. Time and again his ves- 
sels have gone to sea shorthanded (and man- 
ned with incompetent men, at that), to arrive 
in the next port with the crew so fagged out 
that they were glad enough of an opportunity 
to run away without the formality of get- 
ting paid off. His antagonism to the Sea- 
men's Union is mainly because of the activity 
of that organization in trying to obtain bet- 
ter legislation and living conditions for sea- 
men. Mr. Pendleton's latest deliverance on 
the "sailor question," therefore, looks sus- 
piciously like a case of the devil quoting 
Scripture. 



Shipping Notes. 

Our old shipmate, George Lorange, one of 
the oldest members of the Atlantic Coast 
Seamen's Union, recently fell heir to a little 
money left him by a loving old aunt. He 
is now in New York negotiating for the pur- 
chase of a small vessel, with which to go fish- 
ing down South. Edwin D. Cheney, the 
Thomas Jefferson of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, will go mate with Captain Lor- 
ange. Our best wishes go with you, George 
and Ned. Don't forget to read the Journal ! 



Shipping on the Atlantic Coast, viewed 
as a whole, may be described as from slack 
to middling. It has been rather good of 
late in Boston and other Eastern ports, and 
the outlook in that section is favorable just 
now. A rather curious feature of the ship- 
ping situation on this Coast is that, hardly 
without an exception, the vessels which are 
tied up for want of remunerative charters 
are the very ones which were most active last 
spring in reducing wages. The "I-told-you- 
sos" are saying that it serves them right. 

The excursion boats have gone out of busi- 
ness earlier this year than usual, partly be- 
cause of the hard times, but mainly on ac- 
count of the tremendous falling off in the pas- 
senger traffic since the Slocum disaster. The 
tying up of these boats has thrown out of 
employment hundreds of members of the At- 
lantic Coast Marine Firemen's Union, par- 
ticularly in New York and vicinity. Other- 
wise, the Marine Firemen report conditions 
unchanged since last week. Dennis Reddy, 
a member of the Pacific Coast Marine Fire- 
men's Union, was buried in the Catholic 
Cemetery, Jersey City, on September 24, by 
the local branch of the Marine Firemen. 
(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



Four persons were burned to death in 
a bote] fire at St. Joseph, Mo., on Octo- 
ber 7. 

James Callahan, an Iowa millionaire, 

lias left $20,000 to found a home for the 
H ives of drunkards. 

Two were killed and throe fa- 

tally injured in a race riot near Lynch- 
burg, Miss., on September 2(5. 

A plan to double New York's water 
supply, now under discussion, involves 
the expenditure of $90,000,000. 

President Roosevelt has been petition- 

l!ii!i~h reformers to intervene in 

the affairs of the Congo Free State. 

Two hundred and six persons were 
recently arraigned in New York on 
charges of violating the Naturalization 

laws. 

The Panama ('anal Commission has 
advertised for bids for a large quantity 
of machinery and material to be used 
.'ii the [sthmus. 

ii nor Wright, of the Philippine-,, 
has written to President Roosevelt de- 
ploring discussion in the United States 
of Filipino independence. 

Portraits of the Czar, forming part of 
the Russian exhibit at the St. Louis 
Exposition, were seriously mutilated by 
unknown persons last week. 

The earnings of the United States 
Steel Corporation for the quarter end- 
ing September 30 will be about $18,000,- 
000. This is larger than was expected. 

John W. Foster, ex- Secretary of the 
Navy, speaking before the Congress of 
Lawyers and Jurists at St. Louis, Mo., 
recently, suggested the disarmament of 
all nations. 

The three Buffalo (N. Y.) Aldermen 
and four who formerly held the office 
indicted on grafting charges were ar- 
raigned recently and pleaded not guilty- 
Each furnished $1,500 bail. 

Porto Uico's 1,007 public schools open- 
ed on September 2ti, with 07,000 pupils 
enrolled. In the first school year dur- 
ing American occupation there were 800 
scl Is, with 2.3,000 pupil-. 

For the third consecutive winter ex- 
treme destitution prevails among the 
Alaskan Indians, and Government help 
is absolutely necessary to protect them 
from starvation and extermination. 

The monthly statement of the public 
di lit shows that at the close of business 
September 30, 1904, the debt, less cash 
in the Treasury, amounted to $982,382,- 
937, which i^ a decrease lor the month 
of $5,010,409. 

At the annual meeting of the I 
dian Pacific Railway held at Montreal 
on October 5 it was decided to increase 
capital stuck by $25,500,000 worth 
.if bonds, of which $16,900,000 is to be 
issued at g 

Acting Secretary of State Loomis has 
.aided Consul- General John Goodnow at 
Shanghai permission to return imme- 
diately to the United States to answer 
charges preferred against him of malad- 
ministration of affairs in his office. 

The Oceanic Steamship Company's 
ii Machon, which sailed from Vic- 
toria, B. C, on September 29, for Yoko- 
hama, carried a large party of Japanese, 
who have been summoned home by spe- 
eial order for military .service or train- 
in;.'. 

Embassador Azpiroz, of Mexico, has 
filed formal objection with the State 
Department against the construction by 
the United States of the proposed dam 
at Potholes, above Yuma, for the diver- 
sion of the waters of the Colorado 
River. 

The merger of the American. Consoli- 
ntinenta] Tobacco corn- 
panic.- has been temporarily enjoined 
by Nice Chancellor Pitney, of New Jer- 
sey. Bondholders have staite.! a suit, 
alleging that the plan is to save the Con- 
solidated Company at the expense of the 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANT'S 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Hoods Manufactured for 

Seamen. 
YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OCK GOODS ALSO 



lippman bros. 
New Clothing Store 

Goods Direct from the Factory. 
UINIOIV STORE UINIOIN GOODS 

■WielcJwalci Block, Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAIN PEDRO, CAL,. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 



Wholesale Dealer in the Choicest 

and Liquors 



of Old Wines 



BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at the lowest San Francisco prices. 
We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, neur Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
a little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spending 
all you earn, but save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 
splendid opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San 
Francisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that. We offer you lots on 
graded streets with cement sidewalks and curbs, trees planted and water laid 
in, from $350 to $450, at the exceptionally easy terms of $25 cash and $10 
per month until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for 
your lot it will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity 
slip by, but see John Anderson, next door to the new postoffice. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro. Cal. 



JOHN HELANDER 

— Dealer in — 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CIGARS 

Fourth Street, near Beneon, 

San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Stx., San Pedro, Cal. 

— Dealers in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Herald and all San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

BRAND & LAWYER 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausage of all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by TJ. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 



FRED SYENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 
AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

KLIAS WEBBRO, Proprietor. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made < i;:ir». TolinecoM, Pipes, 
Notion*, Etc. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Headquarters tor Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT STREET, OPP. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAX PEDRO, CAL. 



G. W. HARVEY 

The old Time Expressman 

Solicits Your Patronage. 

Give Him a Call. 

Stand at Front St., San Pedro, Cal. 



People's Bargain Store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Fumlsliiiin Goods, Boots and 

ShoCM, Hals nail Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent., Front and Beacon St*., San Pedro. 



S. W. Express 



HANS HENRIKSEN, Proprietor. 

Give your old Comrade a call 
when in San Pedro 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

— Dealer In — 

GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN, also GREEN 

FRUITS and COUNTRY PRODUCE 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL 

OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



'irPnTSTetttP When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 

*»lil£>Tt.rw stlff see to lt tnat the Genuine Un i 0n Label is E 

,„,,„ „. ., ., ln it- The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 

roui edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
t L«L P° S! j es ? lon a nd offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
„ i labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

m vii ■ iv . nn nn c JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MA 11 I I.N I.WM.oic, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 16, New York, N. Y. 



PORT TOWNSEiMD, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

POUT TOWXSEM), WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., POUT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 
around the coiner from the Union 
Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis. 



P. \V. Kisenbels. 



EISENBEIS & SON 

— Dealers in — 
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Crackers. 
ship*' stores a Specialty- 



:il« Water St. 



Port Toivnsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. E Coon, I'res 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. inc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St.. Port Tovt n.icini, Waaa. 

Wareaonaei Burtlctt Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend. Waaa. 

WHOLESALE AND HETAIL DEALERS 

IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries. Dry Goods. Seamen's 

and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest and 

fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

— Dealer in — 
Dry Goods, Clothing. Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
313 Water St.. next to t'oiiiiiioreliil Ilnnk, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorpora. ed 

Dealers in LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS and 

VEGETABLES. Wholesale and Retail. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Kates. 

port TOWNSEND, wash. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

— Dealer in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS 1MI NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER 

FOURTH ST. 

c<n Sts., San Pedro. 



INFORMATION WANTED 

Tom Courtney, of Courtmacsherry, 
County Cork, Ireland, is inquired for by 
the British Consulate at San Franci 

William Hansen, a cook who left tlie 

schooner Ethel Zane about three months 

Wash., is inquired for 

by his wife. Any one knowing of hi* 

whereabouts please address Box 2155, 

San Pedro, Cal. 

The following named seamen are in- 
quired for by the Consulate of S' 
and Norway at San Francisco: Harry 
Xilsen. from Asker : Williaw Anderson, 
from Stockholm; Emil Swanson, from 
n, from Goth- 
enburg; Johan Emil Engebrektaon, from 
Gothenburg; Q rdstrom, from 

Christiania; Jacob II. Dalland, from 
Siglevik; Olof M. Nelson, from Sweden; 
Frithjof Ellinosen, from Drammen; Jo- 
hannes Gudmundsen, from Stavanger; 
K. A. Kolderup Weasel, from ( 
tiania; Johan Sander i from 

Brunneijall; Ed. 15. Herwan, from Stock- 
holm; Edwin Bredesen, from Chris- 
tiania; Gustav Hansen, from Aaka 
Martin Olsen, from Vatteroen; John K. 
\V. Johanson, from h . M. Lof- 

berg, from 1'artille. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 



.•^•^•^•^•>>.-^».->».-^-:^-^>.->fc,->v^>. •>».•: 



jR Pacific Coast Marine. «> 



The United States battleship Ohio was placed in 
commission at San Francisco on October 4. 

The United States naval training ship Intrepid 
was launched from the Mare Island (Cal.) Navy 
Yard on October 8. 

The United States battleship Nebraska was launch- 
ed from the yard ' of Moran Brothers, at Seattle, 
\V;ish., on October 7. 

A metal lifeboat belonging to the wrecked steamer 
Discovery was recently found buried in the sand on 
the Alaskan coast, fifteen miles from Yakutat. 

The gasoline schooner Barbara Hernster returned 
to Seattle, Wash., on October 10 from the Arctic 
with $30,000 worth of whalebone. The crew lost a 
battle lasting three hours with a monster whale. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 6 
from Norfolk, Va., reported that the American ship 
Henry B. Hyde, which recently ran ashore, had 
broken in two during the previous night and had been 
destroyed. 

The new steam- schooner Cascade, built at Eureka 
for the Humboldt Lumber Company, arrived at San 
Francisco on October 7 in tow of the steamer Fran- 
cis 11. Leggett. Her machinery will be installed at 
the latter port. 

The new steam-schooner Norwood, built for Sud- 
den & Christenson, was given a trial trip on San 
Prancisco Bay on October C and met all require- 
ments. The Norwood was built by Hall Brothers on 
the northern coast. 

A schooner built for the South Sea trade, to the 
order of foreign owners, was launched from Chap- 
man's yard at Benicia, Cal.. on October 8. The keel 
of another schooner, to he used in the Mexican trade, 
has been laid by Chapman. 

The steamer Mineola struck a reef off Tigil Bar, 
Kamschatka, on September 5 and became a total 
wreck. Captain A. Kirkwood and the crew of 
twenty-eight men were saved and taken to Hakodate 
by the British war steamer Algerine. 

The British ship Delcairnie, Captain Llewellyn, 
fifty-five days from Newcastle, Australia, arrived at 
San Francisco on October 9 with 2,700 tons of coal. 
Six other vessels which sailed ahead of the Delcairnie 
aic still af sea, but daily expected to arrive. 

It is reported from Bcllingham, Wash., that since 
the first of last week the run of silver salmon has 
been sufficient to supply the seven canneries of the 
lower Sound, which arc putting up fall fish, to their 
full capacity. Heretofore the catches have been spas- 
modic. 

The Neptune Salvage Company, the manager of 
which, Captain Fred Finch, successfully searched 
for the steamer Islander, off Douglas Island, Alaska, 
will now attempt to find the wreck of the Pacific 
Mail liner City of Rio de Janeiro, which went down 
in the Golden Gate several years ago. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 10: German ship Sirene, 133 
days from Liverpool for Valparaiso, 10 per cent; 
British schooner Advance, 08 days from a Mississippi 
port for La Guayra, 35 per cent: Italian bark Gae- 
tano Casabona, 110 days from Sydney for Table Bay, 

5 per cent. 

Good progress is being made in preparing the sur- 
face of Mile Rock, in San Francisco Bay, for the 
lighthouse that will be erected there by the Govern- 
ment. The schooner Wing and Wing has been trans- 
formed into a machine shop by Contractor Mac- 
Mahon, and will be stationed at the Rock until the 
work is completed. 

The German schooner Neptun, Captain H. Schmidt, 
thirty-five days from Jaluit, Marshall Islands, ar- 
rived at San Francisco on October 5 with a cargo of 
fifty-one tons of copra. She will take on a return 
cargo of merchandise for the Marshall and Caroline 
islands, where she has been engaged in trading, and 
will sail again for Jaluit in about two weeks. 

The damage to the steam-schooner Northland as a 
result of striking a rock off Point Pinos some days 
ago while on her maiden voyage to Southern Cali- 
fornia, will amount to $15,000. On October 6 the 
Northland was taken to the Sixteenth-street dry- 
dock at San Francisco, to be repaired. It will be 
some time before she resumes business on the Coast. 

Clark Reimann, a seaman on the American ship 
Shenandoah, has libeled that vessel in the United 
States District Court, at San Francisco for $4,000 
alleged damages sustained by falling from aloft dur- 
ing the passage from Baltimore, Md., to San Fran- 
cisco. Thirteen other members of the crew have sued 
for $425.50 each, on account of bad and insufficient 
food. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 

6 reported that the British steamer Barbara Bosco- 
witz, from Vancouver, B. C, for Northern British 
Columbia ports, struck a reef off ITnrbildon on the 
5th and sank. Four passengers were drowned, but 
the remainder of (lie passengers and crew, number- 
ing ISO persons, were saved. The passengers lost 
were drowned while the boats were being launched. 

All the hhlibut fishermen of Vancouver, B. C, 
went on strike on October 7, and the steamers King- 
fisher. Columbia and New England, of the New Eng- 
land Fish Company's (leels are wit. 'lout, crews. ^ The 
trouble is about wages. The men have been paid 25 
cents a fish, and the Company has adopted a new 
rule for paying them one cent a poroid for fish. The 
latter method of payment the men have refused to 

ace, '(it . 

A new steamer line is to lie established between 
British Columbia and Mexican ports, the principal 
owners of the line being Andrew \Vcir & Co., of Scot- 



land. It is planned to make San Diego a calling 
port. The Company will run modern steamers with 
a capacity of 4 500 tons of freight, fifty first-class 
and 300 to 400 steerage passengers. The boats are 
to be run semi-monthly. The first boat will leave 
Victoria the first week in January. 

The only change recently made on the overdue 
board at the San Francisco Merchants' Exchange is 
an advance of 5 per cent in the rate on the Russian 
ship Dorothea, now out 184 days from Australia for 
Falmouth and quoted at 35 per cent. The same rate 
is quoted on the British schooner Advance, 69 days 
out from a Mississippi port for La Guayra, Vene- 
zuela, a trip that should not have occupied half the 
time. 

Captain B. Butenshon, of the schooner Aloha, has 
reported to the Branch Hydrographic Office at San 
Francisco that on September 3, 1904, in latitude 43 
degrees 30 minutes north, longitude 128 degrees 40 
minutes west, he passed very close to a piece of 
wreckage. It was a hanging knee, about ten feet 
long each way, and appeared to have some wreckage 
hanging to it, submerged. It had the appearance of 
not having been long in the water, but was rather 
black. Captain Butenshon would have lowered his 
boat and made a closer examination, but the weather 
was foggy and darkness was coming on. 

The Dutch ship Europa, now out 163 days from 
Antwerp with a general cargo, is daily expected to 
arrive at San Francisco. On August 25 the vessel 
put into Valparaiso for water, and immediately 
sailed again. The British ship Barfillan is out 139 
days from Antwerp, and also about due. Considera- 
bly more than a year has passed since the French 
ship Bayonne left Dunkirk for San Francisco, but 
much of the time has been spent at Montevideo, where 
she put in on December 12 last, with the master 
drowned and the rigging damaged. At last accounts 
the Bayonne was to have resumed her passage on 
October 10. The French bark Bidart, 161 days from 
Glasgow is another vessel due. The French ship 
Champigny, 158 days, and the French bark Margaret 
Mirabaud, 157 days, are both due from Swansea, 
with cargoes of coal. 

The overdue British ship Lamorna was formally 
posted as missing on September 28. This brings to 
an end all speculation on this unfortunate vessel, 
which is believed to have been wrecked during a 
violent storm off the Vancouver coast early last 
spring. The Lamorna left Puget Sound on February 
28, bound for Queenstown, laden with 27,820 centals 
of wheat, valued at $34,775, and 56,133 centals of 
barley, valued at $63,284. On March 2 the ship 
passed out of the Straits of De Fuca, as reported 
from Tatoosh, but was never afterward heard, from. 
A terrinc storm occurred off the Coast soon after she 
put to sea, and on March 10 wreckage believed to 
have come from the Lamorna was found on the west 
coast of Vancouver Island. Subsequently more 
wreckage was found, in such quantities that little 
doubt was left of the vessel's loss. More than 
200 days having elapsed since her departure from the 
Sound, Lloyd's is justified in posting the ship as 
lost. 

A letter received at San Francisco from Captain 
Cook, of the whaling schooner Bowhead, reports that 
vessel at Herschel Island, in the Arctic, on May 5, 
with all well. Only one death had occurred on the 
three whaling vessels there, a man on the schooner 
Bonanza dying of consumption. A man deserted 
from the Bonanza, also, but he went back to the 
vessel after wandering for five weeks among the 
snow drifts of the desolate coast, and will probably 
recover from the effects of his great privation. Dur- 
ing the past winter, according to Captain Cook, the 
lowest temperature was 40 degrees below zero, the 
season having been mild for those regions. Cook 
expected to be away from the Island by July 5, and 
among the bowheads by July 25. Whalebone was sell- 
ing in December last at $6 per pound, and oil was 
bringing 55 cents a gallon. Captain Cook wrote that 
a calcrT of ten whales would induce him to return 
this season to San Francisco, otherwise he will re- 
main another year in the Arctic. 



DIED. 

Alfred Dame, No. 303, a native of California, 
aged 42, died at San Francisco, Cal., October 4, 1904. 

Alfred Gunn, No. 302, a native of Finland, aged 
:,(, died at San Francisco, Cal., October 4, 1904. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years' an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine 
law in this city. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Rooms 8 and 10, 508 California 
street. Telephone Grant 163. 



Geo. E. Nalder, a member of the Sailors' Union, 
No. 555, is inquired for. Anyone knowing anything 
as to his present whereabouts please notify the 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Information is wanted regarding the whereabouts 
of Sam Larkin, at one time sailing from San Fran- 
cisco. Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Bagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches, and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



SAM 






OFFICIAL 








SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 10, 1904. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping dull. The Committee on Ballot 
for delegates tc the International Seamen's Union 
convention reported that eighteen members desired 
to have their names placed on the ballot (eleven 
delegates to be elected). On motion, the Committee 
was instructed to have the ballots printed. 

A. Furusetii, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 3, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping very dull; pros- 
pects poor. H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Red 208. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 3, 1904. 
Shipping dull ; many men ashore. A few of the 
vessels that were laid up have started to load again. 

P. B. Gilt,, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 05. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 3, 1904. 
Shipping good during the week. 

Wm. Tiiorbeck, Agent. 
88y a Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. No. 443. 

Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 3, loot. 
Shipping improving; prospects fair. 

Wm. Gohl, Agent. 
N. E. cor. F and Heron sts. P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Act. 3, 1904. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

D. W. Paul, Acent. 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood No. 352. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 2, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack : pros- 
pects uncertain. 

P. O. Box 327. J. W. Ericksen, Agent. 

San Pedro Agency, Oct. 3. 1904. 
Shipping fair; prospects medium. 

H. Ohlsex, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 178. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 20, 1904. 
Situation unchanged. 

F. Larsen, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' 
ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 0. 1904. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at ,S 
p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping dull. The report of the Quarterly Finance 
Committee was read and adopted. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 

Seattle Agency, Sept. 29. 1904. 
Shipping medium. 

R. Powers, Agent. 

San Pedro Agency, Sept. 30, 1904. 
Shipping good; no men ashore. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
COAST AND ALASKA. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 10, 1904. 
the regular weekly meeting of the Fishermen's 
Protective Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska 
was called to order at 8 p. m., Ed. Andersen in t lie 
chair. Secretary reported a very poor season for 
Behring Sea in general. The second quarterly finan- 
cial report was adopted as read. An Amendment to 
Article XII, Section B, to read: "The Initial ion Fee 
shall be- ten ($10.00) dollars, to go into effect Jan 
uary 1, 1905," was unanimously adopted, to take its 
usual course. The following members were nom- 
inated for delegates to the convention of the Inter 
national Seamen's Union of America, to lie held in 
San Francisco December , r >, 190-1: I. N. Ilylen, No. 
13; L. Corbett, No. 207; I'M. Andersen, No. 1; An- 
drew Brandt, No. 1; Fred. Ilillinan. No. S7 : Ed. 
Rosenberg, No. 126, and Peter Gade, No. 1. 

I. N. Hylen, Secretary. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Oct. •'!, 1904. 

Shipping slow. Agents were instructed lo post 
si^ns in the halls, staling that the Union is not re 
sponsible for baggage left in its car 

Wm. Pen.IE, Secretary. 



Tonawanda (N. Y.) Agency, Oct. 3, 1904. 

Shipping slack: a large surplus of men on the 
docks. 

152 Main st. Thomas Lester, Agent. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Providence (11. I.) Agency, Oct. :;, 1904. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

James Wilso 



New York (N. Y.) A( ; I ::. 1904. 

Shipping medium. JOHN COBBETT, A- bI 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Coast Seamen's 
Journal 



Published Weekly by 
THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



IV. MACARTHUR.. .Editor | P. SCHARRENBERQ, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail, - $2.00 | Six months, - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday noon 
of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should address 
all communications of a business nature to the Business 
Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second-class 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, south- 
west corner East and Mission streets, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the Journal provided they are of general interest, 
brief, legible, written on one side only of the paper, and 
accompanied by the writer's name and address. The 
Journal is not responsible for the expressions of cor- 
respondents, nor for the return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



OCTOBER 12, 1904. 



THE BUCKLEY APPEAL. 



The appeal for commutation of the deatli 
sentence upon William Buckley is one that 
will be supported by public sentiment 
throughout California. That an atrocious 
murder was committed, and that the mur- 
derer should be punished by the extreme 
penalty of law, is conceded by every one. 
But, precisely because of the general senti- 
ment regarding the crime itself, it is im- 
portant that the greater care be taken in 
punishing tin' perpetrator, in order that the 
public temper may not get the better of its 
judgment on the facts and circumstances of 
the case. 

The appeal submitted to Governor Pardee 
contains much evidence that can not but 
raise a doubt of Buckley's guilt in the mind 
of every intelligent person, regardless of 
prejudice or preconception on the issues out 
of which the murder of Rice arose, or was 
supposed to have arisen. The appeal is the 
work of responsible and representative mem- 
bera of the legal profession and is therefore 
entitled to every respect and credence. Upon 
the strength of the appeal Governor Pardee 
has already granted a reprieve, pending the 
production of new evidence. Even as the 
case now stands there seems to be good 
ground for further Executive clemency. Un- 
less the statements submitted to the Governor 
by Messrs. Ferral and Murphy, and circu- 
lated widely throughout the State, be con- 
troverted by equally substantial evidence of 
a contrary tenor, the feeling of "reasonable 
doubt" must remain strong in the minds of 
the people of all classes. Under the circum- 
stances, the execution of Buckley would be 
a serious thing, serious so far as the public 
sense of justice, not to say mercy, is con- 
cerned. We hope, and believe, that Gover- 
nor Pardee will save the public conscience 
by granting the commutation prayed for. 



Demand the union label on all purchases ! 



LIVERNASH AND WYNN. 



Representatives Livernash and Wynn 
should, and, we believe, will, be re-elected to 
Congress. These gentlemen, elected two 
years ago from the Fourth and Fifth Dis- 
tricts, respectively, of California, have made 
good every pledge and fulfilled every reason- 
able expectation of their constituents; they 
have commanded the respect and attention of 
their colleagues and the Government at 
Washington, and have done credit to the in- 
telligence, honor and manhood of the State. 

Livernash and Wynn should be given a 
mandate to go on and finish the work they 
have begun ; it is good work, and it is in 
good hands. To state the issue of the cam- 
paign in these Districts in a few words, it is 
simply a question of doing work or doing 
politics. Do the people of the Fourth and 
Fifth Districts desire substantial results in 
the form of legislation in their interest, or 
are they satisfied that their Representatives 
shall go to Washington for the purpose chief- 
ly of "supporting flic Administration V The 
appeals made to the voters on the latter 
ground are in reality an insult to the public 
intelligence, since they assume, and by infer- 
ence assert, that the Representative who dif- 
fers, in political faith, from the Adminis- 
tration will necessarily op]X>se the latter 11)11111 
all occasions. 

In plain fact, the cry that the Administra- 
tion must l>e "supported" is simply an appeal 
for the election of men who can be depended 
upon to "stand pat" for the glory of party 
politics, regardless of right or wrong, and 
irrespective of the interests of their Dis- 
tricts and State. Livernash and Wynn may 
be depended upon to "support the Adminis- 
tration" in the future, as they have done in 
the past, when judgment and good faith dic- 
tate that course, and also to support their 
constituents on the same conditions. That 
is all that any reasonable and honorable con- 
stituency can ask for. We confidently expect 
that these gentlemen will be re-elected by 
largely increased majorities. 



The difference between saying that trade- 
unions, as such, should not go into politics 
and saying that trade-unionists, as citizens, 
should not go into politics would seem to be 
obvious, so clearly so that one is justified 
in assuming that it will be understood and 
accepted by one's readers as a matter of 
course. The Journal insists that trade- 
unions, as such, should not go into politics. 
And because it takes this position it has been 
charged in certain sources with opposition 
to political action by the working class on 
working class lines. The fact is that this 
paper has nothing to say for publication on 
the latter score, not because it lacks opinions 
on the subject, but because these opinions 
are out of its line as a trade-union paper. 
Those who insist upon misinterpreting the 
Journal's position in this respect are either 
very dull or very dishonest. 



When buying tobacco — smoking or chew- 
ing — demand the label of the Tobacco Work- 
ers' Union, in blue on each package and plug. 
The Tobacco Workers' label is anti-trust and 
anti-child-labor. 



SEAMEN WILL ENTERTAIN". 



The organizations represented in the Pa- 
cific District of the International Seamen's 
Union of America have determined to accord 
the customary hospitality to the delegates 
present at the forthcoming convention of the 
latter body. A Joint Committee on Enter- 
tainment has been elected, as follows : 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — II. Lund- 
berg, A. Seaman and P. Scharrenbcrg. Pa- 
cific Coast Marine Firemen — W. McDonald, 
C. J. Harrington and A. Pryal. Marine 
( looks' and Stewards' Association — J. O'Con- 
nor, E. Andersen and J. J. Sherwood. Fish- 
ermen's Protective Union — I. N. Hylen, 
Andrew Brandt and H. Goransen. Bay and 
River Steamboatmen's Union — P. Carroll, 
J. Rasmussen and E. Williams. 

C. J. Harrington has been chosen Chair- 
man, and P. Scharrenberg, Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Committee. The whole Commit- 
tee will meet at Sailors' Union Headquarters 
next Monday, October 17, at 5 p. m., when 
the sub-committees will report. The pro- 
gramme will then be submitted to the re- 
spective organizations. The experience and 
judgment of the Committee and the enthu- 
siasm of the local affiliated bodies constitute 
an assurance that all fitting honors will be 
shown the representatives of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union when they meet in 
San Francisco in December. 



The revelations of fraud by the Nonpareil 
Cork Works, of Camden, X. J., in putting 

iron in the compressed cork blocks wmh\ in 
making life-preservers, has shocked the moral 
sense of the public, despite the very general 
disposition To indifference, or at least resig- 
nation, toward corruption in the industrial 
and other activities. The members of the 
firm in question have been indicted and ar- 
rested on a charge of "conspiring to defraud 
the Government," etc. Unless, as in so many 
similar cases, the indictment shall be proved 
defective, there is a good chance that these 
unconscionable scoundrels will receive some 
practical measure of their deserts. In this 
connection we observe a tendency on the part 
of the press to become hysterical in the de- 
mand for the punishment of these frauds. 
One paper, for instance, suggests that each 
of the guilty persons be thrown overboard 
with a compressed iron life-preserver upon 
him. This sort of thing scares nobody, for 
the reason that it is impracticable, besides 
being unconstitutional. The compressed- 
iron frauds have no fear of death by drowning 
or other violent means ; but the prospect of 
going to prison, if only for a year or two, 
would make them shiver in their shoes. The 
duty of the press in this case is to unite in 
an earnest demand for severe punishment, 
not by lynch-law, but by legal process. 



The Yachtsman, a London authority on 
aquatic sports, announces its opposition to 
a continuance of Lipton's efforts to win the 
America's Cup, on the ground that said ef- 
forts have been merely so much advertising 
for Lipton's groceries. The Yachtsman i- to 
be congratulated upon the proof it affords of 
the fact that it can see a joke, provided it 
be given plenty of time and plenty of joke. 



OOAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



STRIKE LOSSES AND GAINS. 



The fiction that the loss to labor during a 
strike is represented by the amount of wages 
which the strikers would have received in the 
given period of work is very clearly exposed 
by the Weekly Bulletin of the Clothing 
Trades, as follows: 

A labor press syndicate, in soliciting our patron- 
age, sends us occasionally the slips of several col- 
umns of "labor" items. The present week has 
brought, among others, the following: 

It is estimated that the garment workers of New 
York City lost about $2,000,000 in wages in the recent 
strike against the "Open Shop." 

It is the appearance of just such hazy paragraphs 
that causes us to decline patronizing any syndicate. 
We very cheerfully grant that the intention of the 
publishers is to furnish to the best of their ability 
sound and well-digested union matter, but it is the 
fear that such blunders as the foregoing may get 
into our columns, apparently by our authority, that 
prevents us swallowing our news without mastica- 
tion. * * * 

There was no loss to the world in general through 
the late garment workers' strike. There are now as 
many garments in the market as there would have 
been had there been no strike. There has been no 
loss to the clothing manufacturers considered as a 
whole. The palpable and grievous loss to the work- 
ers in the trade would have been in supinely accept- 
ing the "Open Shop" and the consequent general 
competition among themselves — a loss past all esti- 
mate. 

Any loss in wages to the individual during this 
summer's strike is more apparent than real. Time 
would have been lost in any event, through the in- 
evitable dull season. The additional work now being 
performed in part compensates for the apparent loss. 
Another source of compensation lay in the strike 
benefits which were issued. 

In view of these facts, while certain individuals 
have lost and suffered for the time being, it is to be 
doubted that on the whole there has been any loss 
to the entire body of New York garment workers. 
What their loss would be, individually and collect- 
ively, if they had not put up the fight, may be imag- 
ined by comparing present wages and conditions 
with those of the time when there was no union. 

The test of the whole case is contained in 
our contemporary's suggestion of a compari- 
son between "present wages and conditions 
with those of the time when there was no 
union." Every one knows that in the ab- 
sence of the power of resistance offered by 
organization, wages would sink to the "sub- 
sistence limit." The mere presence of that 
power — in other words, the fear of a strike — 
is sufficient in many instances to prevent 
the reduction of Avages. When a strike is 
forced upon labor, the ultimate result, wheth- 
er the immediate ends of the strike be at- 
tained or not, is to resist the downward tend- 
ency of industrial conditions generally. 

The Journal has already pointed out that 
the immediate monetary losses incurred in 
a given strike should be figured on the basis 
of the difference between the amount of cash 
on hand at the end of the strike and at the 
end of a like period of work. The results 
thus obtained may not be absolutely correct, 
but they will certainly be much more reason- 
able than those reached by the plan of com- 
puting wages unearned as so much total loss. 
But, whatever the formula used, and what- 
ever the solution arrived at, the essential 
point remains that it is only by resistance, 
passive where that suffices, active where that 
be necessary, that the downward tendency of 
wages can be arrested or an upward tendency 
established. The "strike losses" of to-day 
are the industrial and social gains of to-mor- 
row or next day. 

"What's done we partly may compute; 
We know not what's resisted!" 



The Navy Department has replied to the 
protest of the Sailors' Union (published in 
last week's issue) against the attempt to ship 
a deck crew for the navy collier Saturn, now 
at San Erancisco, at a rate of wages much 
lower than the "going rate" of the port. The 
reply is as follows: 

Navy Department, 

Washington, October 5, 1904. 

Sir — Replying to your telegram of September 30, 

the Bureau of Navigation reports that the crew for 

the Saturn is being enlisted at the regular rate of 

wages established for the collier service of the Navy. 

Very respectfully, 

CHAS. H. DARLING, 

Acting Secretary. 
Mr. A. Furuseth, Secretary, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

The wages offered by the Saturn ($25 per 
month) are fully $10 less than those paid 
on the army transports. Possibly, the Navy 
Department can explain its reasons for dis- 
criminating so broadly against the seamen 
in its service, as compared with those em- 
ployed under the War Department, but 
practical men find difficulty in drawing a 
line between the character of work required 
of the men on the respective classes of ves- 
sel. The niggardly policy of the Navy De- 
partment reflects no credit upon it- manage- 
ment; in fact, as a blow at the standard 
wages of seamen on the Pacific, that policy 
can not be too severely condemned. 



Thomas E. Watson, People's party nomi- 
nee for President of the United States, in 
his letter of acceptance, says: 

If I were President, I would recognize that capital 
and labor have reached a dangerous antagonism. My 
utmost influence would be used to establish a na- 
tional bureau of arbitration. I would ask combined 
capital to choose one man, union labor to choose 
another, and I would myself, as Chief Magistrate, 
choose a third. Such a board of arbitration should 
have jurisdiction over labor troubles and would be- 
come a power of good. 

This, of course, is a proposition to estab- 
lish an industrial triumvirate whose opinion 
shall substitute, or supersede, that of the 
public, and whose mandates shall be law unto 
the people. In a word, Mr. Watson would 
establish compulsory arbitration, a system 
which has been condemned by organized 
labor in this and other countries. Mr. Wat- 
son is to be commended for his courage, if 
not for his judgment, in espousing an "issue" 
which the nominees of other parties are con- 
tent to merely flirt with. The consoling feat- 
ure of Mr. Watson's declaration is that it 
is utterly impracticable — almost as much so 
as his declaration that he is in favor of being 
elected to the Presidency. 



The Sailors' Union of the Pacific enjoys 
the reputation of being largely instrumental 
in establishing a market for union-made 
products in the localities along the Coast fre- 
quented by its members. It should be the 
object and pride of every member to uphold 
the fair fame of the Union in this as in all 
other respects. Demand the union label, 
boys, and don't be put off with anything 
"just as good !" 



The "ideal" union man is the man who 
perceives — and practices — the spirit of 
unionism in his capacity as a consumer. 
Consume only union label products ! 



Referring to the fact that the United 
States battleship Nebraska was launched on 
Friday, the nautical expert of the San Eran- 
cisco Chronicle characterizes the incident as 
"open defiance of one of the most sacredly 
cherished superstitions of the sea." Of 
course, this is all gospel truth ! The Chron- 
icle proceeds thus: 

No sailor will depart from a port on Friday if he 
can help it, simply because of the superstitious belief 
which possesses all of his calling that the day is 
unlucky and that a voyage so started will bring dis- 
aster of some sort to ship and crew. 

When the Chronicle man declares that "no 
sailor will depart from a port on Friday if 
he can help it" he displays a very remarkable 
degree of information on the subject. How- 
ever, if that indubitable Solon of the Sea 
would make good his claim as the "know-it- 
all" of the maritime world he can just put 
it down that no sailor will depart from a 
port on any other day of the week if he can 
help it. 



The predicament of the United States 
navy, owing to the shortage of men, is em- 
phasized by the news that there are not 
enough chaplains to supply the moral and 
spiritual needs of the crews. "As the matter 
now stands," says a press dispatch, "there 
are only twenty-five chaplains for the 30,000 
and more enlisted men in the navy." It is 
now proposed to increase this number to the 
extent of providing one chaplain for each ves- 
sel having a complement of 250 officers and 
men. It's a first-rate idea; but it doesn't go 
far enough. Why not provide each ship with 
chaplains enough to complete her fighting 
complement? The result, apparently unat- 
tainable in any other way, would mean much 
for the peace and piety of the Navy Depart- 
ment, and thus the chaplains would be ful- 
filling their mission to save souls, besides 
saving their prayers. 



The San Francisco Labor Council has 
published the record of the votes cast on the 
labor bills by the members of the California 
Legislature of 1903. The record is com- 
piled from the official publications of the 
Legislature, supplemented by explanatory 
notes from the report of the Labor Council's 
representative at Sacramento. The publica- 
tion is therefore reliable in every way. It 
should be carefully perused by the voters of 
the State as a guide to intelligent action at 
the coming election. 



The man who hopes for the "destruction 
of the unions" in order that the workers may 
be forced into his own pet "movement," 
hopes in vain. When the unions are destroy- 
ed the only movement that will interest 
humanity will he one that moves in the direc- 
tion of some other planet, since the world 
itself will have come to an end. 



The Index to Volume Seventeen of the 
Coast Seamen's Jouknal may be procured 
by our readers upon application to the Busi- 
ness Manager. Readers who have preserved 
files of the Journal will find the Index a 
valuable aid in referring to the contents. 



For union label goods, see Journal ads. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



i><s><s*sxe>3xsxsxe>«xs*sxs>-sxe^. 



> 




Value of Triple Screws. 



Admiral George VV. Melville, retired, in 
an interview recently, declined to discuss the 
naval movements of the Japanese and Russian 

vessels in the East because of the President's 
order forbidding officers of the naval and 
military service to publicly discuss matters 
relating to the Russo-Japanese War. The 
Admiral, however, discussed the value of 
three screws to a war vessel, and used the 
Russian ship Rurik in illustration. In the 
recent actios between the Port Arthur squad- 
ron and that of the Japanese it was reported 
that the Rurik was rendered unmanageable 
by the explosion of a shell which disabled her 
rudder and one screw. Admiral Melville de- 
clares that if the Rurik had been supplied 
with three screws she would have hecn able 
to proceed, notwithstanding the damage to 
rudder and one screw, and that the Russian 
squadron might have escaped. 

"Assuming that the reports of the fighl are 
correct." said Admiral Melville, "that the 
explosion of a shell disabled the Rurik in the 
manner described, she could not be sailed or 
maneuvered, and was. of course, at the mercy 
of the enemy. The rest of the Russian fleet 
naturally fell in around to protect her, and 
received the weight of the enemy's fire while 
the Rurik was vainly trying to repair the 
damage to her rudder and steering gear. 
Finally, after heroic efforts, the Rurik was 
abandoned to her fate, and the Russian fleet 
scattered, making the best of its way, as per 
order of the admiral commanding. 

••Now. here is a lesson we have learned 
from this fighl alone. In battleship construc- 
tion it is next to impossible to provide spare 
rudders or steering gear under water and 
out of the way of the enemy's fire. But by 
the three-screw system, which I urged so per- 
sistently, although vainly, upon our Board of 
Construction, the whole problem is solved. 
For if, as in the case of the Rurik. the rudder 
and one propeller were shot away, with one 
.■enter screw and one wing screw uninjured. 
the ship would have been perfectly managea- 
ble, the center -crew driving ahead, and the 
remaining wing screw steering at will. All 
ships over .°.,000 tons constructed for France, 
Germany and Russian navies are now fitted 
with the three-screw system. Greal Britain 
and the United States alone neglect this greal 
military advantage in time of war, and the 
greatest source of economy in the use of fuel 
in time of peace. 

■•After i itting forth all the advantages of 
the three-screw system to our Board of Con- 
struction, one of the brightest and wittiest 
members of the board said, 'Why, Chief, it is 
had enough to have two screws in a com 
tnanding officer's head without having three 
of them to think of.' lie was right. But 
three screw- in the maneuvering of a battle- 
ship have many advantages over two screws, 
and this one item is simple in comparison 
with the thousand and one other thing 
commanding officer has to think of. In the 
future after the lessons learned from the dis- 
ablement of the Russian battleship Rurik 



more attention will he paid to the three-screw 
system of propulsion. Even though the rud- 
tid center screw of a three-screw battle- 
ship lie disabled, the advantages of the twin- 
screw ship remain. In other words, the three- 
screw system combines propulsive power and 
rudder under all conditions." 



Reindeer in AlasRa. 



In 1901 Dr. Sheldon Jackson, the Ah 
agent of the Bureau of Education, brought 
over from Siberia the first lot of reindeer, 
only sixteen, and started a little colony of 
them on Unalaska, an island lying off the 
bleak coast of Alaska. At first the experi- 
ment was looked upon as rather a waste of 
time and money, but time came to the r< 
and it was clearly proved that these animals 
could be successfully imported and taken care 
of, so that now our good lawmakers are ap- 
propriating $25,000 annually for increasing 
the supply. The reindeer have taken kindly 
to the native moss, which forms their princi- 
pal article of food and, of course, needs no 
outlay for cultivation. There is said to be 
enough of this moss in Alaska to furnish 
plenty of food for 10,000,000 reindeer. 

At the present rale of increase, even if no 
more are imported, there will be at least 
1,000,000 reindeer in Alaska in less than 
twenty-five years. To go a step further, it 
will not be at all surprising, in the opinion 
of some, if this industry should grow to Ik 
one of considerable commercial importance 
to the Tinted States, and it has even he*".: 
estimated that in some thirty-five 
Alaska may be in a position to sell 500,000 
to 1,000,000 reindeer carcasses, besides fur- 
nishing several thousand tons of hams and 
tongues. 

Each doe may be counted on to add to the 
herd a fawn a year for some ten years. They 
also furnish very rich milk, which is said to 
make excellent cheese, the quantity of milk 
averaging about a teacupful at a milking. 

The reliability and endurance of these ani- 
mals is remarkable, making them invaluable 
for transportation service. This is proved 
by the fact that they have now for several 
years been used to carry the United States 
mails on regular routes with the greatest suc- 
cess, and in about half the time requin 
dog teams. They can also be ridden with a 
saddle, and travel along contentedly with a 
pack load of 150 pounds. — Scientific Ameri- 
can. 



Ship Lines to Africa. 



Twenty-one steamer lines connect with the 
port of Durban, Natal, South Africa, among 
which arc four from New York — the Prince, 
the Bucknall-Currie, the Clan Union Ameri- 
can, and the Houston lines. There is also 
the Canadian and African Steamship Line 
running between Canada and South African 
ports. During the year 1903 794 steamers, 
with 1,821,245 tonnage, and 158 sailing ves- 
sels, with 157,973 tonnage, entered the port 
of Durban. 



**V*»»»»*4 



"QuicK Ltinch" Tragedy. 

Who can write the life tragedies that may 
raced to the "bolting" of luncheons 
at "quick lunch counters!" Yet it would 
seem that even a "quick lunch" is be- 
coming too slow for us. Recently I saw a 
sign in the windows and over the door of a 
New York restaurant announcing "The 
Quicker Lunch.'' "The quickest lunch" will 
probably soon follow. Indeed, many young 
business men do not take time even to go to a 
lunch counter. They have luncheon brought 
to iheir offices, where they talk business while 
they dine. 

lias life become so rapid that a man can 
not take time to eat ? Is it possible that he 
can allow himself only ten minutes for lunch- 
eon; and that, even while eating, he can 
ike time to smile, or to turn off the 
steam, but must keep the throttle valve of his 
thinking machine wide open — planning, 
planning, thinking, thinking? 

We have become mad in the matter of dol- 
lar-chasing. Not long ago I heard a busi- 
i ■ - man say to his partner, who had recently 
married, "took his wedding trip on an elevator 
in a New York sky-scraper." It was the 
only lime he felt be could take to celebrate 
such a minor affair as his marriage! 

A man can not be u< »rmal, and can not reach 
his best while living at such a high rati' of 
speed. We Americans can not, under exist- 
conditions, attain that exquisite poise of 
character, that mental balance and that har- 
monious bearing which should distinguish a 
great people of a highly civilized race. — 
Success. 



Famous Masts. 



The masts of the frigate Constitution, 
whose 100th anniversary was celebrated re- 
cently in Boston, were cut in Waldo county, 
Maine, and an old settler, Crosby Fowler, 
relates this story of that important lumbcr- 
ing operation : 

In the town of Unity, mi land now owned 
by C. C. Fowler, the Btump is still pointed 
out where well authenticated tradition says 
that one of the Constitution's masts once 
. a gianl of the forest, towering high 
above nil other trees. 1 well remember hear- 
ing old settler- describe the tree and the man- 
ner of hauling it. 

It took eighteen oxen to move it, and one 
pair in a separate sled to keep the rum along 
to cheer the hearts of the men who had come 
by invitation, with their oxen, to help haul 
the big stick to the Sebasticock, where it was 
launched and afterward floated to tidewater 
on the Kennebec. 

The --tump is much decayed by time and 
defaced by the axes and knives of seekers 
after relics, but there is enough left to mark 
the place where the noble tree once stood. 
This tree was said to be what is termed a 
32-inch mast, and, while not as large as they 
frequently cut in those days, was remarkable 
for its beauty ami great length, as well as 
for its size at the top. — Xcw York Sun. 



mmm 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Baltic to BlacK Sea. 



To build a ship canal from Riga in the 
Baltic to Kherson in the Black Sea, to cut in 
two a continent over 800 miles across to unite 
the Mediterranean with the Baltic, using the 
Black Sea as a connecting link, thus render- 
ing the separation of the Baltic and Black 
Sea fleets at an end, to bring St. Petersburg 
3,000 miles nearer to Egypt, India and the 
Far East, and so provide a new road down 
which the northern glacier may roll upon the 
warm lands of the south — this is the stupen- 
dous task which Russia has set herself to do, 
and to encompass which she is ready to spend 
thirty-six million pounds. 

But although a straight line drawn from 
Riga to Kherson measures only 800 miles, 
the canal will in point of fact be nearly twice 
that length. Mr. Ruckteschell, the great 
Russian engineer, calculates that it will at- 
tain the enormous length of 1,468 miles, 
necessitating a passage of 160 hours, or 
slightly under seven days. 

A portion of the route mapped ont by Mr. 
Ruckteschell, who will probably be intrusted 
with the building of the canal, consists of 
navigable rivers, and there is a waterway of 
some description or other connecting Riga 
and Kherson already. This will, however, 
have to be very considerably deepened and 
widened before it becomes of any use for the 
passage of vessels of deep draught. 

In the Province of Smolensk, at a spot 350 
miles southeast from Riga and 600 north 
from Kherson, two rivers take their rise in 
the same marshes. One of them, the Dnie- 
per, after flowing by a circuitous course for 
J, 330 miles, empties into the Black Sea near 
Kherson. The other, the Duna, flows more 
directly to the Gulf of Riga, the town of 
Riga being situated at its mouth, 577 miles, 
if the windings of the river are followed, 
from its source. 

These two great watercourses, of which 
the Dnieper is by far the more important, 
are connected by the Berezina Canals, by 
means of which the stream of the same name, 
a tributary of the Duna, is rendered naviga- 
ble for rafts and barges. 

Having regard to these facts, it would not 
at first appear that the construction of the 
canal would present a very difficult task, but 
it must be borne in mind that rivers in the 
land of the Czar have an awkward habit of 
drying up in the summer and freezing in the 
winter. Indeed, on some of the canals men- 
tioned traffic is confined to the time of the 
spring floods, so that, even if the channels are 
utilized, the water supply will have to come 
from the outside, and even then it will be 
just as liable as ever to freeze. 

As planned by the engineers, the canal is 
to be 31| feet deep, 140 feet wide at the bot- 
tom and 266 feet wide at surface. A broad 
paved road will be built by the side of the 
canal for the whole of its length, and thus 
there will be not only a canal traversing the 
country from north to south, but a roadway 
also. The strategical value of such a canal 
to Russia it is impossible to overestimate. 

Were she to go to war with Turkey, the 
Sick Man of Europe would be absolutely at 
the mercy of the Bear, who could gobble him 
up with his eyes shut. . 

In the event of a "breaking off of diplo- 



matic relations" with any' of the other Med- 
iterranean States — Austria, Italy, France or 
Spain — the only difficulty would be to pass 
the ships of war through the Dardanelles ; 
and it is quite within the range of possibili- 
ties — Russian possibilities — that this diffi- 
culty would be overcome. 

Should Great Britain be unhappily at war 
with the King's nephew, the Muscovite would 
possess an enormous advantage, always sup- 
posing he could pass the Dardanelles ; for 
Egypt would be open to his attack, as also 
Cyprus, Malta and Gibraltar. 

The British fleet, too, would be compelled 
to watch the Mediterranean and the Baltic, 
instead of the latter only, as would be the 
case if Russia had no canal. Such a canal 
would simplify very greatly the transporta- 
tion of troops to the transcaspian region of 
the Russian Empire. 

Besides the strategic value of the canal, 
there is the commercial side to be considered. 
There could be no doubt but that it would 
prove a tremendous sthrmlus to Russia's sea- 
going trade, what there is of it. But its 
completion would be an undertaking which 
would put the Transsiberian Railway quite 
in the shade so far as great engineering prob- 
lems and difficulties are concerned. 



W. Austin Edwards, of London, England, 
has offered to the World's Fair authorities 
a smuggler's chest 150 to 200 years old. Tt 
originally held twelve one-gallon bottles of 
Holland gin. Six bottles are still in perfect 
condition, while six are broken. The chest 
was found in a barn on the southern coast of 
England. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY 



We Don't Patronize. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 
Union of America) 

121 mill 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone 1321 Monroe 

BRANCHES 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295 

TOLEDO, 1702 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762 
AGENCIES 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL. ...138 Ninety-second Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago 
SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS 
CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS 



Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette. Mich. 
Milwaukee. \\ Is. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman. New York City; Kerbs. 
Wertheim & Schiffer, New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby, Milling Company, Min- 
neapolis, Minn.; Kelley Milling Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meals — Kingan Packing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, la.; Krementz & Co., Newark. N. j. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rocester, N. Y.; Strawbridge 
& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner Bros., New- 
York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt .ind Collar Com- 
pany, Troy, N. Y., Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, 
N. Y.; duett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James 
R. Kaiser, New York City. 

Shoes — Wellman. Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thos. 
Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass.; Harney Bros., Lynn, 
Mass. 

Suspenders — Russell Manufacturing Company, Mid- 
dletown. Conn. 

Textile — Merrimac Manufacturing Company (print- 
ed goods), Lowell, Mass. 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica. N. Y. 

Woolens — Hartford Carpet Company, Thompson- 
ville, Conn.; J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Company, Chicago, 111. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson. Kimberly & Co., printers, Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Company, publishers, 
Hammond, Ind.; Gazette, Terrc Haute, Ind.; 
Times, Los Angeles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS AND STONE. 

Pottery and Briek — J. B Owens Pottery Company, 
Zanesville, O.; Northwestern Terra Cotta Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111.; Terre Haute Brick and Pipe 
Company, Terre Haute, Ind.; Evans & Howard 
Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick Company, St. Louis. 
Mo.; C. W. Stine Pottery Company, White Cot- 
tage, O. ; Harbison-Walker Refractory Company, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wag-on Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Presscott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Davis Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, Dayton, O. ; Computing Scale Com- 
pany, Dayton, O.; Iver Johnson Arms Company. 
Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Company, Syr- 
acuse, N. Y.; Brown & Sharpe Tool Company, 
Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Company, 
Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass.; Hohmann & Maurer Manufacturing 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. ; Henry Disston & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.; American Hardware Company, 
New Britain, Conn. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Ni- 
agara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, O. ; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; 
Payne Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln 
Iron Works, Rutland, Vt.; F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company, Rutland, Vt.; Art Metal Con- 
struction Company, Jamestown, N. Y. ; Erie City 
Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David Maydole Hammer 
Company, Norwich, N. Y.; Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, Elizabeth. N. J. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Mesklr. Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germsr Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stove, Ranges^ and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa. 



Terre Haute 



STREET RAILWAYS. 
-Street Railway Company. 



WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, Davenport, la.; M. Goeller's Sons, Cir- 
cleville, O. 

Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Cooperage — Cincinnati Cooperage Company, Cincin- 
nati, O. ; Northwestern Cooperage and Dumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin; El- 
gin Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Williams 
Cooperage Company and Palmer Manufacturing 
Company, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; BalUrd & Ballard 
Milling Company, Louisville, Ky. 

China — Wick China Company, Kittanning, Pa. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta. 
Ga.; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. 
Y.; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, b.; N. 
Drucker & Co. (trunks), Cincinnati, O.; St. Johns 
Table Company, St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids 
Furniture Manufacturing Association, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 

Gold L,cni — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. Y.; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, 
Cape May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Tex.; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; 
Huttig Sash and Door Company, St. Louis;, Mo., 
Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, More- 
house, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort Bra 
Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia. Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus 
Buggy and Harness Company, Columbus, O. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, 
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, O. ; 
mond Rubber Company, Akron. ( I, 

Pens — L. E. Waterman & Co., New York City. 

Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co.. Ba1 LVla, N. Y. ; 
J. N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Company. Norfolk, 
N. Y. 

Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, I'l 
delphia. Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, O. 
Hallways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Ind.; 

Dla 






10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



Fag Ends. 

The ratio of cruelty to kindness in the 
world is still rather inure than 16 to 1. To 
reverse this ratio is man's true mission on 
earth. 



There is no "'Open Shop" in politics. You 
either have to measure up to the specifications 
of the trusts or gel oul and work for a liv- 
ing — and vote for the candidates of the 
trusts, of course ! 



Strikes, boycotts and lockouts would be 
wholly unnecessary if men generally were 
disposed to yield to right rather than to 
might. Governments would then serve the 
people instead of ruling them. 



The autonomy of a branch of a trade- 
union should be complete, except in ease- 
where the interests or welfare of the entire 
membership of the Union are involved. Fre- 
quent meddling by the members at Head- 
quarters with the purely local affairs of a 
branch dampens the enthusiasm of the mem- 
bers; and nothing so quickly tends In disinte- 
grate a trade-union as apathy. Besides, it 
is more than likely that all the wisdom in the 
Union is not centered at Headquarters. 



What a satire it is on the Declaration of 
Independence and the principles enunciated 
by that documenl thai in the one hundred 
and twenty-eighth year of its existence "the 
lieM governmenl on earth" has shrunk into a 
governmenl of the people by politicians for 
their masters! Tin uncrowned king of 
America to-day is Monopoly, who controls 
the Government through his hired lieuten- 
ants, the politicians. Our politics have be- 
come so corrupt that the word "politician" 
somehow associates itself in the mind with 
"prostitute."' How have the mighty fallen ! 



It is difficult, almosl impossible, nowadays 

to dissociate the idea of success from that 
of wealth. A mental picture of poverty 
seems, Bomehow, to quite naturally associate 
itself with failure and obscurity. This is 
so because our civilization tends to develop 
our ideas of life along material rather than 
spiritual lines; and this, in turn, explains 
why modern Christianity is a failure. Be- 
tween its precepts and its examples there is 
all the difference that exists between the ideal 
and the real. Of all the incongruities in 
an incongruous world there is none to beat 
the spectacle of a rotund, high-salaried prel- 
ate unctuously telling his ultra-fashionable 
congregation that the Son of Man was so poor 
He had not where to lay His head. 



President "Whitney, of the Boston cham- 
ber of Commerce, recently appointed a com- 
mittee consisting of two hundred of Boston's 
leading citizens to work in the interests of 
reciprocity with Canada. Frank K. Foster, 
the well-known writer and speaker on trade- 
union topics, was named as a member of the 
committee. Mr. Foster is a printer, and has 
for many years been active in the labor move- 
ment of Xew England. In a recent debate 
with President Eliot of Harvard, held in 



Faneuil Hall, Boston, on the question of 
"Trade-Unionism," .Mr. Foster unquestiona- 
bly had the best of the argument, and his 
ability and eloquence were publicly acknowl- 
edged by President Eliot himself. The best 
known production of Mr. Foster's pen is a 
volume on "The Evolution of a Trade-Union- 
ist" 



"Wages in British Columbia. 

The following shows the wages paid in the 
lumber and shingle mills and logging camps 
in the vicinity of Vancouver: 

Lumber Malls — Laborers, white, $1.75 to 
$2 a day; Japanese, *1 to $1.60 a day; Chi- 
nese, 90 cents to $1.30 a day; head sawyer, 
$4 to $5 a day: carriage riders (white), 
$2.75 a day; edge men, $2 to $2.50 a day; 

edge ni'ii'- helpers, $1.75 a day; trimmers, 
$2 to $2.50 a day; engineers, first class, $80 
to $125 a month: second class, $G0 to $7.") a 
month; firemen, $45 to $60 a month. 

Shingle Mills — Sawyers, from 11 1<> 15 
cents a thousand feel: packers (Chinamen), 
halt' the amount paid to sawyers; laborers, 
•$1.7.') to $2 a day; engineers, Becond class, 
$60 to $75 a month; firemen, $45 to $50 a 
month ; ( 'hinamen. 90 cents to $1.35 a day. 

('amps- Men are paid only fur actual 
work. If rain or other cause prevents work 
men receive no pay. Fellers, $3.50 f" $1 a 
day; butters, $2.50 to $3.50 a day; sniper,, 
$2.50 to $3 a day; barkers, $2.50 to $3 a 

day; skid road men, $2 to $2.50 a day; hook 
tenders, $2.50 a day; engineers, second elass, 
$60 to $75 a month; firemen, $45 to $60 a 
month. All men pay board, which varies. 



A New Torpedo Boat. 



In a torpedo boat recently constructed in 
England a striking innovation has been made 
in combining steam turbines with an ordinary 
reciprocating engine, the objeel being to se- 
cure economy at low speeds and high efli- 
ciency when the maximum speed i> demand- 
ed, hi the vessel, which is of the ordinary 
design Otherwise, tin re are three shaft.-, to 
each of which one propeller is fitted. The 
reciprocating engine, which has an indicated 
horsepower of 250, drives the center shaft 
at a speed of about 450 revolutions per min- 
ute, a rate sulticient to obtain a speed of 
aboul ten knots per hour. The two side shafts 
are driven by the turbines, which consume 
about J, 75(1 horsepower, and make about 
l.i'oo revolutions per minute, bo thai a speed 
of twenty-live knots per hour is obtained. 
The arrangement is considered to represent 
the most efficient method of using the steam 
turbine on a torpedo boat designed for high 
speed, hut it is thought to he an open ques- 
tion whether the superiority of the turhine 
over the usual machinery in such vessels has 
been demonstrated. Further tests of die ar 
rangement are expected on the trial of a new 
French torpedo boat, with engines somewhat 
similar, and, by comparison with those where 
turbines alone, and reciprocating engines, 
have been used, should show just what kind 
of engine, are most useful for this important 
class of war vessels. — Harper's Weekly. 



Rheumatism is almost unknown in Japan. 
The Japanese escape the malady to a great 
degree by avoiding the excessive use of alco- 
hol and tobacco. 



International Seamen's Union of America. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1V4A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarter*: 

BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 
Branches: 

BANGOR. ME., 44 Union St. 
PORTLAND. ME., 377A Fore St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I., 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 37 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 68 West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Southeast corner Second 
ind Lombard Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD„ 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, VA.. 52 Campbells Wharf. 
NEW BEDFORD. MASS.. 7 South Water St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA.. 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y„ 16 Union St. 
Branches: 

NEW YORK CITY. 51-52 South St. 
BOSTON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
1'ItILADELPHIA. PA„ 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MD„ 1800 Thames St. 
NORFOLK. VA., corner Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE. ALA. 104 South Commerce St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA„ 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATIAMK. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, MASS., 223 Commercial St. 

Branch: 
NEW YORK, N. Y„ 21 Old Slip. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branches: 
GLOUCESTER. MASS.. 141% Main St. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 129 Twenty-third St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, ILL, 121-123 North Desplaincs St. 
Branches: 

MILWAUKEE. AVIS.. 133 Clinton St. 
\uo. n. v.. 56 Main St. 
[TABULA HARBOR, O.. 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O., 1702 Summit .St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT, MICH.. 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR. WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, WIS.. 515 East Second St. 
LAY CITY. MICH., 919 North Water St. 
RACINE. WIS.. 923 Forest St. 
MANITOWOC, WIS.. 809 South Eighth St. 
BRIE, PA., 1"7 Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL, 138 Ninety-second S'. 
SANDUSKY. O., 1107 Adams St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St. 
Breaches i 

DETROIT, MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 

Tl ILE1 M '. ' >.. 1702 Summit St. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 154 Main St. 

OGDENSBURG, \". V., 94 Hamilton St. 

BAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOM \. WASH.. 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH., 88% Quincy St. 

SERDEEN, WASH, P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. OR., 23 North Front St. 
EUREKA, CAL, P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. I., P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MABINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 
Branches: 

SEATTLE. WASH., Colman Dock. Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 
Headquarters i 

SAN FRANCISCO, UAI... 9 .Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH, P. O. Box 12. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 

Mr ••. I: : 

SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION 

Headquarters. Astoria. Or. 

11. M. LORNTSEN, Secretary. 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room is open at all times to Members 

of the Sailors' Union. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mis- 
sion. 

American Printing House, 1067 Market. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, James H., The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Benson & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co.. 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., 321 Cali- 
fornia. 

Brunt, W. N., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. F„ Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 

California Printing Co., 41-43 Eighth. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Commercial Publishing Co., S. E. cor. 
First and Mission. 

Cook, The Morton K, Second and Minna. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Daily Racing News. 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento-. 

Dettmar, C. H., 529 California. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 

Fording & Payne, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 103-109 Union 
Square. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 1019 
Market. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden West Press, 527 Mission. 

Gould, W. H., 1019 Market. 

Hancock Bros.. 73 Third. 

Harvey, John D., 246 Sutter. 

Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hiester. Wm. A., City Hall Square. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hinton Printing Co., 516 Commercial. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lacaze, K, 519 California. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Leidecker, C. Co., 156 New Montgomery. 

Leilich & Colburn. City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lvon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Meyerfeld, Albert M., 414 Pine. 

Meyer Printing Co., 638 Mission. 

Mission Free Press. The, 2401 Mission. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Munk, R., 809 Mission. 

Murdock. C. A. & Co.. 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Pacific Heights Printery, 2438 Sacra- 
mento. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M.. 1010 Buchanan. 

Phillips, Smyth & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press. 723 Montgomery. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-325 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Shanley, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Spaulding. Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co.. 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 

Sterett, W. I. Co., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 213 Stevenson. 

Steutzel & Co., 109 California. 

Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square Ave. 

Town Talk Printing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Turner. H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Upton Bros.. 17 Fremont. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wahl & Drake, 850 Market. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 
Bookbinders. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power, 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. - mmoT 

Kitchen, John Jr. Co., 510-514 Commer- 
cial 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

McGeeney, Wm. H., 33 Stevenson. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 
Lithographers and Printers. 

Britton & Rev, 525 Commercial 

Galloway Lithographing Co., 410 San- 

Roes'ch Co., Louis, 321-325 Sansome. 
Photo-Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey. 107 New Mont- 
gomery, near Mission. 
Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. , 

California Engraving Co.. 506 . Mission. 
Lewis '& Newberry Co., 645 Market. 
McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 
Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant Ave. 
Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 

Union Engraving Co.. 144 Union Square 

Yotemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotype™. 

American Press Association, 207 Sacra- 

Hottschneider Bros., 412 Commercial. 
Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 



Twenty =five 



25 


Expert Shoe Fitters. 


25 


Union Men. 


25 


Partners 


25 


Alen who share the profits of their 
industry. 


25 


Shoe Men to advance the interests of 
Union Stamp Shoes. 



Do We Deserve Your Patronage? 




Phelan Building, 812-814 Market Street. San Francisco. 
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 



$1 aweek $1 

Gold Watch or Diamond 

UIVITBD STATES 
WATCH CLUB 

640 MARKET ST., ROOM 3 I 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager. <A 




Union Boot & Shoe Store 

United Workingmen —Am 
Co-Operative Company's rW$ 
Shoes Constantly on Hand ^* 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

C. LESTER, 12 Steuart St. 



44 EAST STREET 

Room 6— Phone Bush 341 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

ALTERING AND REPAIRING 



J. M. RICHARDS, Prop. 



World's WorKers. 



Be Sit M-lmllK Tailors 



English Worsted Suit $15.00 
English Tweed Suit . 15.00 
Scotch Tweed Suit . 13.50 



XXXX Beaver Suit . $22.50 
French Pequet 0. & V. 15.00 
English Serge . . . 14.00 



PANTS TO ORDER, $400 30 SSX tt SS! t0 

By co-operating together we are enabled to make you a suit of any ma- 
terial known on a profit of $2.50, be it XXXX Beaver or French Cassimere. 
Not a trust — but co-operation. 

Dependable Work. You Select the Cloth. 

Perfect Fit. We Do the 'Work. 

CAN YOU TOUCH THE ABOVE PRICES ELSEWHERE? 

~~- - 31 Market Street 

AVE ARE OUR OWN 
BOSSES. 



THE SIX CO-OPERATIVE TAILORS, 

We are far down Market Street. 
Reason: Rent, $15 per month. '*»,;',; 



The Monogram Cigar Store 

All kinds of Union-made Cigars, Cigar- 
ettes and Tobacco. 

150 EAST STREET, COR. HOWARD. 

GUS HOLMGREN, Proprietor. 
Agent for the Steam Laundry. 



The Castle Cigar Store 

250 East Street, near Folsom, 

KEEPS THE 

BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS AND TO- 
BACCOS. 

Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
G. H. PALMER, Proprietor. 



The French Transatlantic Company, 
having agreed to make certain conces- 
sions, the striking seamen have decided 
to resume work. 

Canadian trade-unions have decided to 
send agents to Great Britain and other 
parts of Europe to discourage emigra- 
tion to Canada. 

Under the New Zealand Arbitration 
Court's award, the Auckland district 
house painters receive Is. 3d. an hour 
for a 44-hour week, and unionists get 
preference of employment. 

The West Australian Arbitration 
Court, dealing with a firm of butchers 
for paying an employe less than the 
rates fixed by the Court, ordered them 
to put up the amount short paid — over 
$75. 

By virtue of the Russian Emperor's 
ukase extending the privileges of resi- 
dence to certain classes of Jews within 
the pale, the police have received in- 
structions hereafter not to expel Jewish 
workmen from villages in which they 
have taken up their residence since 1882. 

The Adelaide (Australia) Operative 
Bootmakers' Union has written to the 
three boot trade unions in New South 
Wales urging them to make preparations 
to take united action for an Australian 
minimum wage for the trade as soon as 
the Federal Arbitration Act becomes 
law. 

Ninety-five Japanese contract laborers 
were forwarded from San Francisco to 
Mexico recently by the Southern Pacific 
Company. The men landed at the for- 
mer place from Yokohama and were all 
under contract to a coal mining com- 
pany at Las Esperanzas, Mexico, for five 
years at a rate of 05 cents a ton. 

The delegate board of the Northern 
Colliery Employes' Federation, of New 
South Wales, has decided to grant £100 
to the men at the Waratah colliery, 
who have had only six days' work dur- 
ing the last six weeks, and £400 to the 
Co-operative colliery men, who haven't 
averaged 23s. per week during this year. 
The money is to be replaced to the funds 
of the union by a 2V4 per cent levy on 
the earning of members of the Federa- 
tion. 

The Brisbane (Queensland) Worker 
says: "All trade-unionists will regret 
to hear that the Victorian Coal Miners' 
Association has disbanded. The long 
and heroic fight put up by members 
of this union against the tyrannical 
mineowners will long be remembered. 
The whole of the records and effects 
of the late Association have been left 
in possession of late Secretary Wilson, 
who maintains that unionism is not 
dead in the coal districts, and will come 
again stronger than ever." 

Recently a large deputation, repre- 
senting Victorian (Australia) employers 
and employes, urged on Premier Bent 
the necessity for legislation to prevent 
the furniture trade passing into the 
hands of Chinese. It was stated that 
there were 014 Asiatics engaged in the 
Melbourne furniture trade, and only 
about 100 Europeans. Unless action! 
were taken there would be no white 
men in the trade, and suggestions were 
made to license the Chinese and to place 
their factories under the control of 
lockers. 

The outlandish decisions of the West 
Australian Arbitration Court, and the 
biased attitude of Judge Parker, the 
President, have caused great discontent 
among the workers of that State. At 
a mass meeting in Perth recently the 
following resolution was carried unani- 
mously: "That it is the opinion of this 
meeting that the Arbitration Court, as 
at present administered, is a menace 
and a danger to the rights of the work- 
ers, consequent upon its action in re- 
fusing to recognize the principles of 
the Act as hitherto interpreted." 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



General News. 



The SKcct Metal Workers' Btril 
extended from Philadelphia, Pa., to New 
York. Chicago and Boat 

Henry C. Payne, Postmastei ' leneral 
of the United States, died at Was 
ton, D. C, on October I. aged sixty 

The legality oi the practice oi I 
tian Science in New Hampshire was up- 
held by the Supreme Court of that State 
on < Ictober 4. 

The Postomce Department is arranging 
the mail Berviee to the war zone in ac- 
cordance with advance of the Japanese 
- in Manchuria. 

Frederick August* Bartholdi, the 
French sculptor and creator of the 
statue of Liberty, in New York harbor, 
died at. Paris en October 4, aged sev- 
enty years. 

It is said that there is likely to he 

trouble in the West Australian building 
trades, as the employers are trying to 

enforce a reduction of from lit to 20 
per cent in wa - 

President Roosevelt has countermand- 
ed the plan of the War Department 

transferring the work of making uni- 
forms from the soldiers' widows to a 
private contractor. 

It is rumored that both .Japan and 
Russia have arranged for the building 
of warships in the United State-, the 
former with Charles M. Schwab, and the 
latter with Lewis Nixon. 

Unemployed workers appear to he 
pretty numerous in Perth, West Aus- 
tralia. A carrier there recently adver- 
tised for a driver and was beseiged by 
150 applicants for the job. 

The Republican Executive Committee 
of the Tenth I onal District of 

Georgia has announced the nomination 
of II. Porter, the only negro practitioner 

at the Augusta bar. to oppose T. W. 
Ilardwiek for Congress. 

It is learned at, Homestead, Pa., that 
the Carnegies have received, through 
New York agents, in the past ten 
orders from both Japan and Russia for 
armor plate, both sides wanting orders 
tilled with greatest possible - 

(t is considered probable that the dap 

anese conscription law will lie am 

by increasing the reserve service to live 
years, thus making tie regular and re- 
serve Service total seventeen years and 
five months. This will mean a large 
increase in t hi' arm] . 

The baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
t harles McDaniel Landon, of Columbus, 
(!.. is surrounded by four great-grand- 
mothers and three grandparents. Of the 
foui mdmothers three li] 

generations ire unbroken. None of the 
great-grandfathers is living. 

The report of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad Company for the year ended 
June 30 shows that the gross earnings 

524,574, an increase of 
169, and operating expenses $24,234,542, 
an increase of $202,449, leaving net earn 
ings of $22,290,031, an increase of $180,- 

01 it. 

A direct threat was served on tie- city 

of New Yoik on October 5 by the Ship 

Trust that, unless it can secure docking 

privileges in the New- Chelsea improve- 
ment it will withdraw all of the 
>hips under its control, representing 100 
bottoms and 4S0.5^:'. tons, from the port 
of New York. 

Governor Robert M. La Follett 
Wisconsin won a com] i in the 

state Supreme Court on October 5 in 
the contest between the "St ilwarl 
"Half-breeds" of Wisconsin politics. Mis 
name and those of othei candidates for 
State offices, placed in the field by the 
June convention that Dominated him for 
. rnor for a third term, will 
I : allot, undei I 
- Republican Ticket." The names of the 
candidates for Roosevelt and Fairbanks 
electors will be on the same ticket. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Lett Used for six months 

at the Sailors' Union Office for 

twelve months, all told. If not called 

tor at the expiration of one year letters 

will be returned to the Postofflce. 



id, A. M. 
son-3 i it 
John 
Adreasen, Kdvin 

ip, Rich. 
Ahlquist, Albert 
Alexis, Hakan 
A linn. John 

.. M. 

ndsen, Pet 
Amundson, Alf. 
Andersen-689 
Andersen-863 
Andersen-912 

rsen-925 
A n.lersen. Adolf 



Anderson-68 
Anderson, A. E. 
Amierson, Carl All 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, H.-403 
Anderson, J. E. 
Anderson, Sven 
Andersson-139 
Andersson-1184 
Andersson, A. W. 

-,son. C. S. 
Andersson. Eskll 
Andersson, Hjalmar 
Antonsen, Martin 
Apps, Alf 
Arnesen-1111 



.\imi'l^nii, nuwu ai ncocii-.i.. 

, n. Bernhard Arneten, Ragnvald 
sen. li. Hj. Arntsen, Erik 



Ole 

Andersen, Sjur 
linker, C. P. 
Baker, John 

in, ]'.. M. 

Barber, A. 
Bastion, W. 
Bauer, K. < I. 

, . I.udv. 

il R. 
Beohler, Joseph 
Bee. Colin 

-1171 
1 ■ 

i -1210 
I d, S. 

I ternert, Fred 
Blankenfeld. O. 
Blinne, Karl 
Block, Alf. 
Plomberg. Gus 
Cainan, Geo. 
('arisen. E.-699 

en, John L. 
Carlson, C. V. 
Carlsson, Axel G. 

on, John 
Carlsson, W. S. 
Camaghan, Mr. 
Caroe, Arthur 
Christensen. K. 
Chrlstensen, G. I,. 



Aselius, Algol 
Asmussen. M. C. 
Blom, Philip 
Bock, Chas. 
Bohnhoff, H. 
Borini. Lewis 
Bottcher, J. G. C. 
Boudoux, Leon 
Boyesson, Carl a. 

■ i 1 1 1 i mi. K. 

Brandters. J. 
Brandt, Otto 
Braun. F.-1195 
I ;■■:! v. John EC. 
Bredesen, Edwin 
Brillowsky, N. 
Brooman, Henry 
Brose. R. 
I trown, E. 
Byerling, C. A. 
Christensen, J. R. 
Christensen. O. M. 
< hrlstiansen, Carl 
Clausen-793 
Cleary. Thomas 
Clementsson, A. 

■h. H. R. 
Connor, John J. 

nor, Win. 

per, Hans 
Cuno. J. 



Christensen, Henrik Cutmann. A. R. 

W. G. i er, Geo. S. 

Dahl. John M. Dodgson, A. H. 

1 lahlberg, Gunnar Doense. J. 
1 lahlgren, Albin Dorlis. Harold 
i lahlgren, Karl Dorsch. Fred 

J. — (M.) Draeger, M. 
, Ernst Dyck, Max 
De Han n. G. A. 
Eglit, Fred 
Ekblom-607 

t , W. 
Ekstrom. J. P. 
Ellison, EdN. 
Els, John 
Emanuelsen, C. 
Fabricius, H.-170 
in. John E. 
er, A. 
dstad, Olai 
Flodln, John 
Forst i-oin. Fr. 
Gaedecke. E. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Glaubltz, Fred 
Gohring, Wm. 
Gossi 1, Pa ni 

ten, J . 
Haberman, H. 

, .. l.i nnart 
Hnknnsson, G. 
Halvorsen, H. 
Halvorsen, Morten 
Halvorsen. Wm. 
Hansen-1162 
Hansen-1218 

n, Andrew 
en, Geo. -1410 
I inns. ni. i [ana 

a, II. H. 
i tansen, H. Sigur 

in, John P. 

n. Maurius 

in, Xokhart M.Holm, Oscar 
i. eo. -1218 Holtti, John 



Enbom. Wm. 
Engell, Emil 
trom. C. 
F.rlksen-512 
Erikson, E.-38 
Evald, Ernst 
Evensen. Einar O. 
Foster, Frank 
Fox, Thomas 
I'oyn. Sam 
Freiman. August 
French, J. A. 
Furst. John 

i 111. Hjalmar 
Gray, J. K. 
Grey, E. J. 
Gulbransen, Nils 
Oundersen-515 
' lunlach, John 
i [eleneue-1360 
Hell, A. -1012 
IKlsteen-1241 
Herhold, w. 
I [erma n, a b-x 
Hesselberg, K. 
Hetebrugge, W. 
llill-1148 
Hinner, Paul 
I [lxson, J. W. 
Hjelmer, w. 
Hji ri sen, V. J. 
Hobson, Thomas 
l [okansson, Fred 

! lolnns. i 'hris 
Holmes. Martin 



Ilmisson-1270 
I lansson. Hilmer 
1 lardy, Win. 

man, Wm. S. 
Am.- 1179 
I inzol. W. 
Ild. Julius 

sen-1126 
i seu-1511 

en, Emil 
Jakobsen, x. C. 

W. 
Jankeri, Oskar 
n, A'eert 
-on-1234 

.lansson. John 
Jansson, R. A. 
Jens, Otto 
i 769 
Jenscn-1461 
Jensen. Anders C. 
■ . F. 
I nst. 
' S69 

Jensen, IT. F. 
,li nsen, Martin 

sinus 
Johansen- ' 

1216 
Kaehne, R. 
Kanger. Herman 

Karlsen, John L. 

in, Karl R. 
Karlsson-603 
Karlsson, G. J. 

Kask. John 

. P. 
.1. J. 
Kerharo, Frank 
Kepmka, R. 
Harry 
Niels 

en, Carl J. 
-ner. Karl 
John 
i itto 

.ardt, N. 
I.nrkin. Sam 
Larsen-643 
Lnrsen-916 

n, Anton 
' -824 



Hornberg-1383 

Horn, Krist 
Horstman, H. 
Hoss, John 
Houston. Rob 
Mo rley, James 
llstad, Olaus 
Johansen, B. J. 
Johansen, F. C. 
Johansen, G. E. 

i nsen, John P. 
Johansen, T. P. 
Johansson-880 
Johansaon-1096 
Johansson-1396 
Johansson, A. 
Johansson, Aug. 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, Nils L. 
Johnsen-983 
Johnson-588 
Johnson-1201 
Johnson-1399 
Johnson, Ed. F. E. 
Johnson, W. J. 
Johnson, Wm. 
scar 
Jordfold, Theo. 
.Iiirgensen, Theo. 

ph, E. S. 
Jungjohan, J. 
John 
in. G. 
Knudsen, Fred 
Knutsson, O. H. 
Knutson, Ola f A. 
Kokkala. H. 
Crane, Karl 
Krlstensen-928 
Kristensen, H. 
Krlsterisen, Hans 
Kristensen, O. M. 
Kristiansen, T. O. 
Kristoffersen-614 
Kristoffcrsen. K. II. 
Krohnert. Alb. 
Kunedt. Wm. 

Lelneweber, J. 
i .-win, Chas. 

| nrl-1042 
I.illie. Fred 
I.indstrom, G. A. 
Lite, Knut 
Lockwood. Chas. 
Lofberg. F. Magnus 



Larsen, Hans 
I.arsen. X. 
Larsson-933 
Laskey, W. 
Lau, Gust. 

e. l. 

Legallais, Jules 
Madison, David 

Madsen-952 
Madsen. Hans M. 
M olsen, L. E. 
Magnusson, Karl 
Mahoney, F. E. 
Malmkvist, Carl 
Mardeson. Andrew 
Martelock, Chas. 
Martinson, M. 
Materre, Alex 
Mathison, J. M. 
Mathsen, Olaf 
Matiasen, Nils 
Mattejat, W. 
Maunstrom, Wm. 
Mavor-1371 
Neilsen, M. P. 
Nelson-663 
N'iehlasen. N. C. 
Nielsen-678 
Nielsen-751 
Nielsen-859 
Nielsen, Berger 

l, Niels C. 
Nielsen. Ole 
Oberg, Herbert 
Oberhauser. J. 
Oliegrun, John 
Olsen-206 
Olsen-630 
Olsen-699 
i-727 
Olsen, Hans J. 

M.nrinus 
Olsen, Oscar 

n. Torwald 
Pi ike. Harry 
Parkko, Ma it in 
Passon, Bruno 
Peabody. Frank 
Pedersen, Chr. 
i '. dersen, Ole 

en, 'I'h. K". 
Pederson, Louis 
Perry. Ben 
Petersen-659 
Petersen-954 
Rahlf, Jurgen Koike, Geo. 

Rasmusen, Alb. Rollo, R. 

Rasmussen, Geo. P. Rosan, Oscar 

Wm. Ruellans, Jules 

Riches, Alf.-663 Rustad, Sverre 

Robinson, W. Ryder. J. E. 

Rohl, Werner 
Salhareasen, Jorgen Smith, John A 



Lolman. Werner 
London, Frank 
Lorentzen-990 
1 iorenz, O. i B, 
Laden, Albin 

ph, II. 
Lund, Chas. 
McCarthy, Peter 
McCarthy, t. 
McCombs, F. S. 
McGarrick. John 
Meinseth, Albert 
Menthen, Otto 
Merriam, B. \\ r . 
Michael, Walter 
Mikkelsen, S. 
Morre. B. F. 
Morrl ssey, J 
Morris, Wm. T. 
Mortensen, M. H. 
Mullen, Leo L. 
Muller, K. 
Mullins, Dan 
Munson. Mi 
Murstadt. A. F. 
.Nielsen, Peter 
Nielsen, W. 
Nielsen, Willie 
Nilsen-671 
Nordblom, B. G. 
Nurse, Uriah 
Nvmalni. '.''ollx 
Nymann. J. C. P. 
Nyroos-769 
Olsen. Sam 
Olsen, Terje 
Olsin, Olaf S. 
Olson, Olof 
Olsson-597 

n-812 
Olsson-824 
Orchard. S. H. 
( isterbi rg, < !a ri 
i isterberg. Frit 
Petersen, Viktor 

Peterson-920 
Peterson, J. I ' 
Fetterson. Knut 
Pettersson-725 
Phair. Wm. 
Pick, R. O. W. 
Piedvache, E. 
Pollack, Paul 
Preuss, Fred 



Salvesen, Sam 
Samsioe, Sven 
Sandav, Frank 
Sandberg-938 
Sandberg, Theodor 
Santos, Augustln 
Schade, Wenzel 
Schaefer. T. 
Schultz-1307 
Schutties. Eugen 
Schwenke, Karl 
Sehey, J. O. 
Self, Arthur 
Si rrero, Louis 
Setterberg, K. 
Shubert, Otto 
Sllloots, 'I'onnies 
Silva. Joe H. 
Simonsen-1147 
Bimonaen, Tom 
Simpson, T.. C. 
Sirvertsen, Hilmar 
Sjursen. Ingvald 
Thiele. A. 
Thoren, Gust 
Thorn, Arvid 
Thorssen, Fred 
Toick, Mat t 
i ' "ii berg, Chas. 
Udby, Harold 
I'dd. John-885 
I'ken. H. 

Lohen, !•'. 
Von der Molen, D. 
Vassallo, P. 
Vick, Chas. 
Viereck, Heinrich 
Wagner, J. 
V\ all. R. A. -744 
Walter, E. 
Warren, Frank 
Warren, W. A. 

Watson, J. i-'. 
Weibust, John 
Weiden. Ed 
Weide, Paul 
Welsh. John 
W. sik. Gust. 
Westerholm. V. W. 
Westin, John 
Younger, A. J. 
Zacho, K. 
Zachrlsen, J. M. 



Smith. Valdemar 
Smith. W. 
Soderman, Elis 
Si diie. [ngwald 
Sorensen-1460 
Sorensen, N. 
Sorensen, Theo. 
Sorensen, T. M. 
Staaf-1464 

l.ouis 
Stahn. Otto 
Stenberg, Alt. 
Stephan — 1455 
Sterne, Geo. 
Stockman, L. 
Stosch 

Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundholm, Erik 
Sundholm, Frans 
Svendsen. Otto 
Svenson-1295 
Svensson, Karl o. 
Swederius. C. E. 
Tompson, Loui 
Torkkel, Kristlan 
Treelnes-524 
Tv< dt. H. S. 
Tulin. Fritz 

Ulright. T. 
Unterein, F. 

Vincent, Jos. 
Vogel, A. 
Void. O. P. 
Von Kleist, II. 
Vneieh. V. 
Wiberg, John 
Wlebke, Krnst 
Wihi ol. Ernest 
Wi.ik. II 

In i :- • ■ 1 1 Chas. 
Will, Clem 
Will. Geo. 
Williams. R. E. 
Wilson. Robert 
Winter, John 
Wirnhof, P. 
Wright, C. 
Wright, W. B. 
Zlllmann, B. 
Zimmerman 
Zerberg, Geo. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

Ahlstrom.AU Edvardsen. J. 

Albers, Geo. Eichman. W. 

Albertsen, Johan- Eklund, H. 

nes Eriksen, Fred 

Altonen, G. N. Felix, L. 

Andersen, A. -826 Fergusen, J. 

Andersen, Fred H. Fjelstad. O. 

Andersen, L. T. Forstrim. C. 

Andersen. V. V.-991 Francis, E. C. 

lerson, Alfred Gonderson. M. 
Anderson, Charlie 
Anderson, J. 



Amierson, J. Edv. 
Anderson. Wm. 
Arcedius, Ture 
Arnesen. Anders 
r.aker, Ed 
Balke, E. 
Bauer, K. I. 
Beckwith, W. N. 
Berg. Thos. A. 
Berglund, A. 
Bluseth. M. 
Krurim. A. 
Cameron, H. B. 
Cameron. R. 
Campbell, John 
Canrenus. W. 
Carlson, L. P. 
Ceconi, F. 
Charlson, D. 
Christensen, Adolf 
Christensen, G. L. 
Christensen, K. 



Gonzales. F. 
Grainger, J. 
Greenland, H. 
Gregor. Edvin 
Gronlund, O. 
Guke, John 
Gundersen, Anton 
I l.i -Kind, Carl 
Haldorsen, A. E. 
Hanley. J. 
Hansen, Alfred 
Hansen, Edvard 
Hansen, Henry 
Hansen. H. E. 
Hansen. H. P. 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hansen. Markus H. 
Healey, T. 
Hellman. Carl 
Henrlksen. Joseph 
Hermansen, Albert 
Hermansen, F. 
Hermansen, L. 
Hofman, F. 



Johanson, H.-135 
Johnson, Chas. 
Jollnit, W. 
Jones, B. O. 
Jonsen, L. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen. E. 
Johansi 

johannesen, J. -1119 
Johnson, Hjalmar 
Johnson, James 
Johnson, John 
Josefsen, F. W. 
Jurgess, J. A. 

han. H. C. 

Keastner. Hans 

Kloperstrom, W. 

Knudsen. Sam 

Kongsvald, R. 

Kopplin, Robert 

Krallman. A. 
. F. 

3 .ai sin, A. -HI 1 

I.arsen. Axel 

1 .urscn, C. L. 

I.arsen. E.-933 

l ,arson, Nils 

Lauren, J. O. 

Lehman, J. 

Lie, J. I.. 

Kind. John 

l.ind. K.-885 
I niiii, A. 
in, John 
John 

l.orentsen. J. P. 
en, C. H. 

B. W. 
Martlnsen, K. 
Mayer, Albert 

kanys, W. 

J. R. 
r, Albert 
uen, A. L. 

Morrisse. D. 

Munson, M. 

Nicklasen, H. 

Nilson. C. 

m, TI.-680 

Nilson, H. 

Nilsor. 

n, Eskeld 

Xissen. Jens 

Nuitanen. H. 

Oberg. C. W. 

Olsen, B. 

Olsen, C. 

a, Carl J. 

Olsen. E. 

E. M. 
L. K. 

Clsen. Marius 

Olsen. O. H. 

Olsen, Oscar 

Olsen. P. F. 

Olsen. P. O. 

Olsen. R. 



Olsen, Sam 
l'aaso. Aud 

in, C. 

n, J. 

1 1 . P. 
Federson, Lars 
Pehrsing, H. 

I.. 
Pendvi u 

-en. H. A. 
Petersen, P. 
Peterson, John 

Petterson, ( >t to 
Pieper. 1 1. 
Prell. li. 
Pringle, R. 
Ramm, Wm. 

■ M. 
Keineh. 11. 
Rlordan, P. 
Robertson. M. 
Rogne. J. T. 
Rude. A. M.-14 17 
Salonen, E. 
Salvesen. K. 
Sandberg, A. 
Sarin. C. 
Scholen, J. 
Schwartskopf, P. 
Selander, G. 
Severtsen, Geo. 

Simonsea. !•'. 
Smith ■ 
Smith. Paul 
Smith. Wm. 
Soderman, J. M. 

^n. Chas. 
i. ii. M. 
Soren 

en, P. K. 

M. 

Stahsing, W. 

Strom, A. 
Strom, J. G. 
Sullivan, W. J. 
-en. Sven 
Swansen, G. 71. 
Swanson. John 
Swensen I 
Owens 

Thayfon, John 
Thompson. Robert 
Thomsen. Ed 
Thorsen. M. 
Thorsen, Theo. 
Wahrunberg, O. 
Walker, Geo. 
Warren, Wm. 
Wennerliind. A. 
Welzel. K. 

Wieh. W. 

A. 
Wiedner. K. 
Wilson. Thos. 
Whit 

kl, P. 



- \\ I'I'.Dltll, (VI.. 
Akselsen, Johan Johannesen, Jacob 



Akerblum. Charles 
Allen. John 
Amelsen, Johan 
\ mneii, Albert 

Anderson-907 

Andersen-912 

Ander 

Andersen. Edvard 

Andersen, Ingbret 

A. 
Andersen. Joseph 

ien, Salve 

son, A. B.-l 119 Johnson. Chas. 
Anderson. A. J. i P. J. 

son. Alfred Karlson, J. A. 
Anderson. A. G.-549 Karlson-388 

son. Bertinius Karlsson. I 



Johanson, J. -1462 
Johanson, Na t anial 
Johansson. Carl- 

LB19 
Johansson. Carl L. 
Johndahl, Harry 
Johnsen. Carl-588 
Johnson-1281 
Johnson, Edward 
Johnson, Edward A. 
i. Michael 
in. P. 
Johnston, O. W. 



Christoffersen, HansHoving, B. A. 



Clausen, C. J. 
Cockran, R. B. 
Dahlgren, C. J. 
Dahlberg, Joseuh 
Daly. J. 
Didriksen. I. 
Dyk. C. J. Van 



Huhley. Howard 
Jacobsen, J. A.-779 
Jacobson. Oscar 
Jensen, G. A. 
Johansen, L.-1210 
Johansen, 0.-139 
Johansen, Wm. 



Anderson. F.-671 
in, John 
in, Martin 
A nderson, Otto 
Anderson, S. 
Anderssen-853 
Arniale. Frans 
.'. rvidsen, Axel M. 
Laker, John 

E. 
i tli imquist, H. 
Bock, Charles 
i rick 
irlc 
Boose. 

, William 
Bortram, Wm. 

Uage) 
Brouford. Charles 
Bryndal, Henry 
i matlc, Charlie 

■:. An gUSt 

' ■ irlson, Eric 
Carlson, J. 

on, J. -388 
Carnaghan, W. X. 
it e, I'.odiou 
i Ihristophersi i 

-804 
I lilo 

< •nnerford, L. 

1 .-'at. J. 
' limli ii h. Hermann 

nd, J. A. 
i Charles 
Erikson, Alfred 

nind. G. E. 
n. Arthur 
Frietrom, I. M. 

Jim W. 
Green, F. 

all, Johan 
Frederik 
Grunbock. Johan 

eh, John 

'son, A. F. 
Gustafson, J.-432 

< rustafson, K. Os- 

k.ar 
Gustafson, Oskar 
1 1 nstavsr-n. Ben 
1 lalversen. Wm. 
i M P. 

■ii, AlfV.G. 

Bernhard 
t tansen, Laurits 
i la nsen, Theodor 

:. ,i. 
n. Hilmar 
ike, F. A. 
Hendei sen, J. 
Hinze, A. F. W. 
-kar 
Hull. Harry 

Janliunen, W. 
I i son. C. L. 

in, Carl W. 
M. M.-38C 

Jensi n, c L.-1461 

n, Lewis 
n. Rasmus 



Km 

Karlsson. John 

Kenna, Peter J. Mc 

K l h 1 . 1 ! 

Kittelsen, Laurits 

Klingstrom, Gun- 
nar 

Klover, lb- iiir. 

K nndsen, i taniel 

Kristensen. Gustav 
Kris! I I. B. 

en, Karl 
A. 

u. Gust. 
Larson, ( llaf Edvard 

y, J. 
Lehtom 
I.mdqvlst. I 
I .ovenhjelm, E. M. 
Lundberg, Erik 
T.undin. Charles 
Makelalnen, J. 
Markmnnn, I ' 
rich 

.. Victor 

Mikklesen. 

■ 'hris- 
lian 

Nelson, T. H. 

i-ft20 

Nlelson. X. C. 

Xissen. James 
V. <;. 

Emil 

Andrew 

n, John B. 

olaf 
.. N.-502 

i Hson. Benny 
w. 
rhuis, R. 

ing. Emil 

■ on 

■ airy 

. II. 
n. G. 
a. Mart In 

1-446 
-iscn. Emil 
i ussen, olaf 

II. 

Robstad. Sorensen 

John 
Rohdi 

Ro.-i.nl, lad. K'arl 

Royden. w. II. 

n. A. 
Sa ndberg, Tin odor 
■ " - 1 1- 1 

schinit 

itto 

14fi4 

StefTel 

•ii Karl 
v. A Ihert 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE HID FRfiUT 



THE ONLY STORE ON THE 
WATER FRONT OF HONOLULU 
EMPLOYING WHITE LABOR 
EXCLUSIVELY. 



SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 



FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
OIL CLOTHING, TRUNKS, 
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS 

THE RED FRONT 

COR. QUEEN AND NUANU STS. 
HONOLULU, H. I. 



MYRTLE CIGAR STORE 

Importers and Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. 

The only House keeping a full line of 

Union-made Goods. 

T. J. FITZPATRICK, Proprietor. 

836 Fort Street. Honolulu, H. I. 



HOFFMA N GIQ AR STORE 

Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor, 

Cornel- Hotel and Nuuanu Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Svenson, Sven 
Svensson, Nicolaus 
Svensson, Thure 
Syvertsen, Isak 
Thallos. Mr. 
Thompson, Stephen 
Thorve, Gustav 

Danielsen 
Tomask, Math. 



Wahlstadt, Albert 
Walbergh, Joseph 
vvarren, Fred 
Werner, Ruben 
Westerholm, Aug. 
Whyne, Fred 
Wikstrom, Anton O. 
Zugehaer, Alex. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



Ahlquist, Harry 
Anderson, Frank 
Braver. Dave 
Doose, W. 
Dickson, George 
Drummond, Steve 
Degeorges, Leon 
Dahl-517 
Eckberg, C. E. 
Filliet, Lorens 
Fristrom, S. M. 
Gunluck, John 
Gilbert, Wm. 
Grondahl, John 
Horkman, T. 
Hansen, Hans Bas- 

berg 
Holmes, C. V. 
Hrelja, Frank 
Hellander, Wm. 
Jansson, Harry 
Jonesson, Fr. 
Johannesen, Ed. 



Johansen, Soren 
Jones, John 
Kohff, R. 
Katcharin, Jacob 
Linder, C. A. M. 
Lindberg, John 
McRae, Alex. 
Muller, Fr. 
Nelson, Chas.-393 
Nilsen, Henry 
Pederson, P.-S96 
Stephan, C. 
Soderlund, E. 
Tornstrom, Chas. , 
Reitz, Alec. 
Revfem 
Rice, P. B. 
Roscheck, P. 
Wiebeck, Wal. 
Wahlstedt, A. R.- 

778 
Westerberg, Nils 
Westerlund, C. W. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, Geo. 
Andersen, E. 
Anflndsen, O. 
Arntsen, E. 
Andersen, Lauritz 
Anderson, Ben 
Amerson, Olof 
Buch, D. 
Bernhardsen, K. 
Coffman, Milo 
Cedargren, A. 
Carlson, G. 
Christison, Harry 
Doyle, H. 
Dischler, P. 
Diedrichsen-786 
Engman, E. 
Eliasen, E. 
Farclig, B. 
Fergusen, J. 
Gasman, G. 
Horeldsen, Ch. 
Hansson, J. 
Hult, Wm. 
Hahuer, Fr. 
Hendrikson 
Halltham-1285 
Janhunen, F. 
Jones, Ch. 
Jordan, Ch. 
Jorgensen, P. 
Jorgensen, John 
Johansen. Martin 



Kent, S. 
Kuglund, C. 
Knudsen, S. A. 
Kolderup, K. 
Lillie, F. M. 
Lahde, Th. 
Lyche, N. 
Dinden, M. A. 
Lindstrom, Fr. 
Ivlagnusen, C. E. 
Martinsen, F. 
Mathisen, M. 
Meinking, W. H. 
Miettinen, A. E. 
Nyroos, O. J. 
Olsen, O. J. 
Olsen, S. 
Owens, John 
Olsen, C. A. 
Petersen-782 
Peterson, P. 
Pettersen-856 
Roberts, Ch. 
Rogind, S. 
Svenson, Sven 
Salversen, Sam 
Stevensen. J. 
Schmidt, Ch. 
Thomas, John 
Westgard, D. 
Wickstrom, A. 
Warren, Fr. 
Wilson, Rob. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Adams, Walter 
Allen, Frans 
Andersson, A. A. 
Andersson. J. 
Arcadius. Ture 
Borini, Henry L. 
Bruce, John 
Cederstrom, Wm. 
Carroll, R. 
Cross, D. D. 
Currie, James 
De Bruin, J. 
Erikson, Aleck 
Ferguson, Julius 
Fogarty, J. P. 
Fraser, James 
Frazer. John R. 
.Garside, James 
Gilhooly, H. 
Glouagucn 
Gustafson. Aksel 
Hansen, Edward 
Hansen, H. 
Hilarion. Chas. 
Hinner, P. 



Ingebretsen, Nils- 

•107 
Jensen, W. E. 
Johanson, Ernest 

.lull.-! nsuii, Frank 
Johansson, Knut 
Johnson. Maune 
Klein, T. 
Knutzer, Charles 
Labastide, Joe 
i ..i iii,>. Francois 
Legallais, Jules 
Lie, ( 

Tandberg, G. W. 
Lindstam, Olof A. 
Lundberg, K. 11. 
McCarthy, John 
Nielsen, N. 
Nyberg, C. 
O'Donovan, Jack 
Ong, George 
Samuelsen. Krist 
Schilling, Carl 
Sorensen, C. 
Swanson, F. O. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store closes at 6 p. in.; Saturdays at 10 p. in. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CABRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



I McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE-NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

1332 PACIFIC AVENUE, TACOMA, WASH. 



Call 
at 



The Union Cigar Store 

WHEN IN. TACOMA 

FOR 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY AND 

PIPES. 

Local and 'Frisco Papers always on 

hand. 

2223 North Thirtieth Street. 

MERRIT TERRILL, Proprietor. 



HOQTJIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor 
call at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIaM AND ABERDEEN 

For your Clothing, Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Shoes, Rubber 

Boots and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



UNION MADE CLOTHINC 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND GAPS 



o4^ 




HOQUIA.M. 

WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Anderson, Harry 
Begowick, John 
Bjornstad, Nils 
Boock, Christian 
Borlin, J. 
Bray, J. K. 
Brussell, Ed. 
Buch, David 
Eidswaag, Peter 
Ekerlein, Frans 
Eslon, V. 
Evans, John 
Furlong, James 
Burst, Ragner 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Granbom, Emil 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hanson, August 
Horsley, R. S. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johanson, Karl F. 
Johnsen, Martin 
Jorgensen, Sofus 
Jorgensen, Walter 
Karlson, Oscar S. 
Kask, John 
Kristianson, C. F. 



Lorentzen, E. M.- 

866 
Lubke, John Von 
Mackay, Joseph 
Martinson, Holger 

E. 
Nielson, Niels 
Nilsson, Henry 
Norheim, John 
Olsen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pott, George 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Sarnde, M. J. 
Sjonborg, Harold 
Smith, A. 
Soderman, Oscar 
Starkey, Wm. 
Stoessle, Camille 
Thampson, Harry 
Thompson, C. M.- 

251 
Vestergren, Anton 
Waldron, Harry 
Weide, Paul 
Wideberg, Oscar 
Zellmann, B. 



EUREKA, CAL. 

Asmussen, McC. Klint, Sam 

Anderson, Chas. Lehnhard, W. 

Andersson, L. T.-735 Lovi, Alfred 
Anderson, J. Emil Meyerkana, Valter 



Andersen, Henry 
Anderson, Nils 
Brown, Frank 
Carlson, Pastar L 
Carlson, Atel 
Dercks, Chr 



Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, Karl A. 
Patiyariski, P. 
Prauss, Fred 
Toucer, Chas. 
Sanders, Frank 



Hansen, Hans Tea- Spreeslis, Fred 

dar Sorensen, Thorn. 

Hansson, Gust. Hj. Steffany, Joseph 
I Ialnberg, Alfred A. Walsh, P. R. 
Halvarsen, H. Weiss, Wilhelrn 

Johnson, John 

HONOLULU, H. T. 

Borkman, F. Passon, T. 

Cole, H. Peabody, F. 

Eggers, J. Rohden, A. 

Hansen, M. Rose, W. K. 

Haroldson, C. Sinlor. A. K. 

Hillborn, F. Sigvartsen, C. O. 

I lansson-1270 Sohrimper, F. 

J.ikkopsen, J. Thorsen, T. 

Kure, P. Todt, J. 

Nelson, S. H. Thomas, J. 

Olsen, C. A. Wouters, H. 

Ouchterlong, F. Vatland, G. 

Letters In the Oillce of the Fishermen's 
Union of the Paclilc Coast 
.-■nil Alaska. 
Andresen, Thoralf Jacobsen, C. E. 



Annus, John 
Bonde, Ths. 
Dahl, Ben 
Eliasen, Edv. Nik. 



Nelsen, John 
Nelson, Peter 
Tishel, Mathias 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
— Visit — 

WALTER EHRLICHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods. Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 
be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS, 

JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 

UNION MADE 
^^^L^j^^^ Watches & Jewelry 

19 HERON STREET, ABERDEEN, WASH. 




UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

I*. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 
24 Heron Street. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



You can get good 

HONEST UNION MADE GOODS 

FROM 

A. W. BARK LEY 

56 G Street 

Becker Block, next to Bicycle Works, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 
He carries everything a sailor wears. 



Have your photographs made while in port by 

THE ABERDEEN ART CO. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 

Marine Views, Enlarging, Copying, 
& Crayon Portraits, Picture Frames. 

C. V. LOV, Prop. 
40« Market St. Aberdeen, Wash. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 



GO TO 



F. KINGSTAD 

Agency for Aberdeen Steam Laundry. 

Stand on entrance to Union Office. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



W. C JUDSON 

... EXPRESSMAN ... 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
phone .... ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Sailors' and Loggers' Outfitters 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods. Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins. 



THE RELIABLE 
CLOTHIER . . . 



GEO. FISHER 

Heron Street, ABERDEEN, WASH. 



News from Abroad. 

The Moorish Governor of Arzila, Mo- 
rocco, was recently murdered by tribes- 
men. 

II is reported that the main Russian 
army lias commenced the retreat north 
waul from Mukden. 

The Canadian Parliament was recently 
dissolved, and a general election was or- 
dered for November 3. 

Statistics of Japan's finances indicate 
ability to carry the war through 1905 
without embarrassment. 

Count Tisza, Hungarian Minister of 
the Interior, has prohibited the Mormon 
propaganda in Hungary. 

German banks have taken up the Mex- 
ican loan of $0,375,000 for the building 
of the Tehuantepec Railroad. 

The Chilean Government intends to 
open the Oqtii Isthmus in Magellan 
Straits, with the purpose of shortening 
navigation. 

A car containing United States mail, 
on a train from Paris to Havre, was 
recently broken open and ninety-one bags 
were rilled. 

Japan has concluded purchase of the 
American Tobacco Company's interests, 
adding 1,000,000 yen to the price, thus 
assuring monopoly. 

It is said that Russia will probably 
decline to send a representative to The 
Hague Peace Conference, to be called by 
President Roosevelt. 

The information of the Russian War 
Ofliee proves that the Japanese losses 
during the siege of Port Arthur have 
been 45,000 killed or wounded. 

Alderman John Pound, Chairman of 
the London General Omnibus Company. 
Limited, has been chosen Lord Mayor 
of London for the ensuing year. 

Russia is alarmed by growing unrest 
among Buddhists of Central Asia. A 
"holy war" is possible, designed to es- 
tablish an independent kingdom. 

The Pope recently called for a service 
of atonement by the Catholics in Rome 
for the insult offered to the Holy See 
in the meeting of Freethinkers there. 

A severe earthquake has wrecked the 
Governor's building and four school- 
houses at Talcahuano, Chile. The Quin- 
quina lighthouse was ruined. No deaths 
have been reported. 

The report that Japan and Russin 
have arranged a direct exchange of news 
regarding prisoners of war without *-»>' 
intermediary of the United States and 
France is confirmed. 

A dispatch to the London Daily Tele- 
graph from Seoul says the expected rais- 
ing of the Russian cruiser Variag, which 
was sunk at Chemulpo on February 9, 
was successfully completed on Septem- 
ber 30. 

Prince George, of Schaumberg-Lippe, 
lias tiled a protest against the succession 
of Count Leopold as Regent, alleging 
that the lattcr's great-grandmother was 
not legitimately descended from the ao 
ble family. 

A dispatch from the Paris Temps from 
Toulon says the Russian Government has 
negotiated for the construction of eleven 
torpedo-boat destroyers of the late I 
model by the Compagnie Des Forges el 
( handlers de la Mediterrae. 

General Kuropatkin, on October 2, is- 
sued orders for a forward movement of 
the Russian army. The advance began 
on the 4th, and on the 7th the Russians 
captured the Japanese position at Benl 
siapul/.c, inflicting heavy losses upon the 
latl a 

The British expedition to Thibet left 
Lhassa September 23, having comp 
the object of its mission. In bidding 

■ i HI to Brigadiei I (eneral MacDon- 
ald, commander of the British military 
forces, l lie \ enerable Regi n1 an oked the 
blessing of heaven on his head for spar 

in" i he ii" I eries from i iola I ion, and 

pre ented him with a golden image of 
Buddha. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The San Francisco Labor Council has 
issued the labor-bill record of the mem- 
bers of the last Legislature, for the use 
of voters at the coming election. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
has ordered work resumed in various 
places where it had been halted because 
of a desire to retrench financially. 

Textile workers of Philadelphia, l'a.. 
have decided to ask the Legislature of 
that State to pass a law fixing a fifty- 
five hour week for women and children 
employed in mills. 

It is reported that fourteen hundred 
members of the Amalgamated Rubber 
Workers' Union, after a five weeks' 
strike, have announced their readiness 
to return to work under whatever terms 
were offered. 

After a shut-down of two months, four 
of the open-hearth furnaces of the Car- 
negie Steel Company resumed operations 
on October 1. Nearly 500 men were put 
to work, making a total of 2,000 men 
employed at the South Sharon (Pa.) 
plant. 

It was announced by the Cam 
Steel Company on October 5, that the 
Armor Plate Mills at Homestead, l'a.. 
would, on the 9th, be opened up in full. 
These mills have been running in full 
but twice since they were opened many 
years ago. 

The third Bessemer steel converter 
and the Soho furnace of the Jones & 
Laughlin steel plants, at Pittsburg, Pa., 
resumed operations recently, and the 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufactur- 
ing Company have placed six depart- 
ments on double turn, affecting 1,000 
men. 

Judge Roberts, of Warren, 0.. has 
granted an injunction against Harmony 
Lodge, Amalgamated Association of lion, 
stcd and Tin Workers, and citizens "t 
Girard to prevent strikers and sympa- 
thizers from interfering with the opera 
tion of the Carnegie Steel Company'c 
( lirard plant. 

The lockout of the 300 boilermakers 
and their helpers in the Erie Railroad 
Company's locomotive shops at Susque 
hanna. Pa., has taken on a new phase, 
the company having imported to that 
place three carloads of 150 non-union 
men. Another contingent of non-union 
men is expected. 

The Carnegie Steel Company an- 
nounces that every department of the 
Homestead (Pa.) plant resumed opera- 
tions on October 9, giving employment 
to 2,000 men. The Monongahela works 
of the American Sheet and Tin Plate 
Company resumed operations on the 
10th, employing 500 men. 

John Shaleen, of Dickson City, was in- 
dicted at Scranton, Pa., recently, charged 
with mining coal without having first 
taken out a certificate of competency. The 
case is the first of the kind ever brought 
in that region, and is the result of a 
crusade of the United Mine Workers to 
secure a higher grade of workmen in the 
mines. 

Preparations are being made for the 
resumption of operations at many win- 
dow-glass factories throughout the coun- 
try, after a suspension of nearly five 
months. Fires are being started, and 
within the next thirty days thousands 
of skilled employes and their helpers, 
who have been idle since last spring, 
will be back at work. 

Work has been resumed, after a brief 
period of idleness, in the car shops of 
the Pullman Company, at Chicago, 111. 
The Company will put 2,000 of its for- 
mer employes to work at wages lower 
by 10 to 20 per cent. They will be em- 
ployed in the repair department. In 
their number will be found none who 
has been known as a labor agitator. The 
cut in wages is general, extending to the 
office force. The scale at the shops has 
ranged from $1.75 to $7 a day. 



FOR SALE 
VOLUME XVII 

OF THK 

Coast Seamen's Journal 



BOUND AND INDEXED 



PQipr to unions affiliated with the International Sea- 
nlUL men's Union of America, or members thereof, 



$2.00 



• • • A pp ] y to . . . 

BUSINESS MANAGER, COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



WHEN IN PORT 

Trade with the Old Reliable 

SAWTELLE STORE 

— Dealer in — 

PUHE GUM BOOTS. CANVAS 

BOOTS, LLAMAS AND OILSKINS. 

In fact e veryth ing appertaining to 

Seamen'* Outfit.*. 



3 Z^Z' SAWTELLE BUILDING 

fro in 

cuioDoaic,! EUREKA 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 



First-Class Board and Lodging 

Ri asonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C nnd D, 
IUREKA, CAL. 



The Humboldt Lodging House 

F. ROUGES, Proprietor. 

NKATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE IN 
EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 

BY THE 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

403 FIRST STREET, EUREKA. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City or County on short notice. 

HALT1NNER & JOHNSON, Proprietors 

CITY SODA WORKS 

PETER DELANEY, Proprietor. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 
Has Removed to 439 Second St. 

CORNER OF F, 

White Labor Only. EUREKA, CAL. 



THE MODEL 

Union-made Clothing and a full line 
of Men's Wear. 

The Model $3.50 Shoes 

Orders taken for Union Tailor- 
made Suits. 

AUG. GUSTAFSON. 437 Second St. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging. $5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 25c .and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in town. 



CORNER FIRST ANU D STREETS. 



WHEN IN PORT CALL AT 

South Bay Hotel 

FIELDS LANDING. 



J. B. BIRD, Proprietor. 



Good Board and Lodgings by day, week 
or month. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



5 



ISSUED ay authority OP 



5 D 4^3^R 




flHT 



REIilSTERIO 



jm 



$ii*»\£.& 



From 
Maker to Wearer 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling goods at less 

than Eastern prices. 

THE BLUE RROINT 

Manufacturers and Retailers 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

S12 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. SEATTLE, WASH. 



Phone Red 1786 

IRA A. CAMPBELL 

PROCTOR IN ADMIRALTY. 

Rooms 210-217 Bailey Building. 

Seattle, Wash. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR EXAMINATION 
NEVER HAD A FAILURE. TERMS MODERATE 

Navigation 

— AND — 

Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. JAS. MARSHALL 

614 First Ave. , Seattle Comptmneg Adjusted 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Navigation and Nauti.al Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Miss Helen C. Smith, - - Instructor 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
sail, American and British. 
222r.i/ a Klrst Ave. Phone Black 5424. 



Capt, Sorensen's Navigation School 

Established 1899. 
105 PASSED— NO FAILURES 

Room 59, . . Safe Deposit Building 

First Avenue, foot of Cherry Street, 

. SEATTLE, WASH. . 



O'CONNOR'S GICARS 

The popular favorites. Equal in flav- 
or and aroma to cigars of twice their 
cost. They are made by union men, 
therefore always reliable and in good 
condition. Best value ever known. 

C. O'CONNOR 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



PORTLAND, OB. 



EXPRESS NO. .01 



Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

F. F. JOHNSON. 

Phone Hood 350. PORTLAND, OR. 



Headquarters for Seamen. 

NEW YORK LODGING HOUSE 

Albert Halleii, Proii. 

Newly Furnished Rooms. Entirely Remodeled 

Prices Moderate. Phone Hood 352. 

203 BURNSIDE STREET. 

Cor. Front, near First I'ORTI.A ND, OR 



INFORMATION WANTED 



John Mullen, who was employed as 
fireman on the steamer Ventura some 
two and one-half yean ago, is requested 
to communicate with his wife at 69 
Clyde St., Anderston, Glasgow. 

C. Roach, who left the British ship 
Lynton at San Francisco in February, 
1900, is requested to communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Mary Roach, 4 Queen 
St., Queenstown, Ireland. 

John McGovcrn (alias John Wilson), 
last heard of in New York March, 1902, 
when on board the S. S. Calburga, is 
inquired for by his mother at Belfast, 
Ireland. Anyone knowing his present 
whereabouts will please notify the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Information regarding the wherea- 
bouts of Friedrich Wilhelni Budde, born 
at Coeln-Deutz, April 1, 1868, who left 
Germany twenty years ago as a cabin 
boy, and last wrote to his relatives from 
Santa Barbara, Cal., in 1891, is respect- 
fully requested. German Consulate, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. H ABERE R, PROP. 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE 

Carries n full line of Clgrnrs, Tobaccos 

and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone Iuil. 118. 




CLOTHING HOUSE 



Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Boots, Shoes 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

All Union made Goods 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



BONNEY & STEWART 
UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia St-.., Seattle, 'Wash. 



Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. IS. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. H UTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Pine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 




SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



UNION MADE BY UNION MAIDS 



A 




V 



California Undertaking Co, 

Private Residence Parlors 

R. J DEVLIN. MANAGER 

W. L. Likobcy, Secretary 

CORNER POST 405 POWELL ST 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 
OPEN »AY AND NJOHT TELEPHONE MAIN »T1 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James C. Bartlett, aged 34, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

K. A. Johnsson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Rendal, in 1902, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

John Welsh, a native of Central Amer- 
ica, member of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Martin Andersen, a native of Tors- 
lando, Oland Sweden, is inquired for by 
his brother, G. Andersen, at present in 
the Marine Hospital at San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Herman Heino, native of Finland, aged 
25, who left Australia one year ago in 
the schooner Golden Shore, bound for 
Puget Sound, is inquired for. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Emil Enberg, a native of Finland, 
aged about 30 years ; last heard of in 
San Francisco a year ago, is inquired 
for by Captain S. A. Enlund, ship Glen- 
ard. Address, W. R. Grace & Co., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

O. Peter Valdemar Petersen, born in 
1867 in Kallunborg, Denmark, last heard 
of in 1896, when sealing from San Fran- 
cisco, and was living in Rio Vista dur- 
ing the winter from 1890 to 1894, is 
inquired for by his brother, P. C. Peter- 
sen, box 41, San Pedro, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall. 

We Sell the Kind of Goods You Require. 

EXTRA STRONG HICKORY SHIRTS \ 
BEST OVERALLS f |||||ni| . Anr:i 

GOOD LUMBER SHOES f UN,0N LABtL 

STOCKTON FLANNEL UNDERWEAR) 

ALSO A FULL LINE OP GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS. 
Look at our Goods. You will be pleased. No trouble to show them. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

Of California. 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAI $3,000,000.00 

rAID UP CAPITAL AND RESERVE $1,725,000.00 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or Trustee. 

Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court pro- 
ceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully 
selected. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, President. Horace H. Hill, Vice-President. H. Brunner, Cashier. 



| ' ■ -- 




A. ANDERSON, 



The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Corner Drumm and Commercial Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone James 4846 

A new building erected especially for 
sailors. Latest improvements, clean and 
light rooms, bath, reading and dining 
rooms. First class board and lodging at 
reasonable rates. Gospel service — Sun- 
days, 3:45 p. m., and Wednesdays, 8 
o'clock p. m. All welcome. 

missionary and Manager 



UNION STORE 

HOR UNION SAILORS 
AND FISHERMEN 

By making cash sales only we are 
enabled to sell at the lowest figure. 



STABENS & FRIEDMAN 

CLOTHIERS and OUTFITTERS 

257-259 Pacific St. 

Between Battery and Front, San Francisco 



JOE HARRIS 

Sea-faring . Men's . Outfitter 

Ready Made Uniforms. 
Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., near EAST 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



EXPRESSING 

— Done by — 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Cor. East and Mission Sts. 



ilors Outfittinq Store 



J. GOODMAN 

110 Berry St., San Francisco 

The Best Goods in the Market. 



M. A. MAHER 

Glen's - Furnishing: - Goods 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Workingmen's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 



H. WARRINGTON 

SAILORS' FURNISHING GOODS 

Union-made Shoes, Hats, Caps, Under- 
wear, Tobacco, etc 



You'll find everything strictly first class. 

711 Davis Street, near Broadway. 

(Opposite Pier 9.) 



GREENS UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry 

SAILORS* OUTFITS 

Best quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL, WITH THE UNION LABEL. 

We give you a square deal. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH - SIDE - HOTEL 

806 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and King Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and lodging, $5 per week. All 
rooms single. 



206 EAST STREET, NEAR HOWARD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



FRANK JOHNSON 
SAN PEDRO HOTEL 

6 HOWARD STREET, S. F. 



Domestic and Naval. 



Newly furnished. Large and airy 
rooms by the day, week or month, at 
reasonable rates. 

FIVE MEAL TICKETS, 91. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Andrew J. Stewart, a native of Maine; 
was sailing on the Coast two years ago; 
is inquired for by relatives. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

John Williams, alias John W. Assars- 
son, a native of Sundsvall, Sweden, last 
heard of in San Francisco, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

G. L. Jensen, who sailed from San 
Francisco about January 12 last on the 
schooner Emma Utter and discharged on 
arrival at Gray's Harbor, is requested 
to call at the United States Shipping 
Commissioner's office at San Francisco. 

Oscar Sander, aged 15, dark hair, 
brown eyes; left the Orphans' Home at 
Los Angeles several years ago to ship as 
cabin boy in a vessel at San Pedro, Cal., 
is inquired for. Anyone knowing his 
present whereabouts will please notify 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 



The United States battleship Connecti- 
cut was launched from the Brooklyn 
(N.Y.) Navy Yard on September 29. 

The schooner Joseph L. Mulford, which 
went ashore in the Delaware Kiver, be- 
low the Marine Hospital at Lewes, on 
September 15, iloated recently, unassist- 
ed. 

The American line has decided to take 
two ships out of commission, and have 
fortnightly sailings from Philadelphia, 
Pa., after November 5. Reason, lack of 
freight. 

Trie schooner Elvira J. French, from 
Newport News, Va., for Portsmouth, is 
supposed to have foundered in the recent 
Equinoctial gale. Two of her crew were 
landed at Norfolk recently. 

General Humphreys, Quartermaster 
General, United States Army, has or- 
dered that the army transports Kilpat- 
riek, Sumner and McClellan, lying at 
New York, be put out of commission. 

The British steamer Loyalist, bound 
from Halifax for London with a general 
cargo, went ashore at Seal Cove, Tre- 
passey Bay, near Cape Race, during a 
fog on September 28. She is a total 
w reek. 

Captain Hemphill will be asked to re- 
store the punchbowl presented to the 
United States battleship Kearsarge by 
the Emperor of Germany. Captain 
Hemphill claims that the bowl was a 
personal gift. 

The French steamship Admiral Fouri- 
chon arrived at New Orleans, La., re- 
cently, from Santos, via Rio de Janeiro, 
with 91,517 bags of coffee, valued at 
$1,000,000. This is the largest cargo of 
coffee ever brought to New Orleans. 

The wrecked tugboat Israel W. Dur- 
ham, which foundered in the recent hur- 
ricane, causing the death of eight per- 
sons, has been raised from the river near 
Wilmington, Del., by Captain John J. 
Williams, of Chester. 

The Norwegian steamer Hippolyte 
Dumois, at Philadelphia, Pa., from Port 
Antonio, passed a derelict schooner, with 
foremast standing, on September 28, in 
latitude 37 degrees 18 minutes north, 
longitude 74 degrees 43 minutes west. 
There was no sign of life on board. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports that 
328 sail and steam vessels, of 40,374 
gross tons, were built in the United 
States during the quarter ended Sep- 
tember 30, 1904. During the correspond- 
ing quarter ended September 30, 1903, 
310 sail and steam vessels, of 66,023 
gross tons, were built. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports that 
105 sail and steam vessels, of 14,699 
gross tons, were built in the United 
States during September, 1904. The 
largest steel steam vessel included in 
these figures was the Wilkesbarre, of 
1,197 gross tons, built at Wilmington, 
Del., for the Central Railroad of New 
Jersey. 

George R. Dilkes & Co. have purchased 
the steamer Algiers, to run in the line 
of the Southern Steamship Company, 
between Philadelphia, Pa., and Tampa, 
Fla., by way of Key West, to take the 
place of the steamer M. F. Plant, re- 
cently purchased by the Oregon Coal and 
Navigation Company, of San Francisco. 
The Algiers is a vessel of 2,200 tons ca- 
pacity, and has been engaged in the New 
York Galveston trade of the Southern 
Pacific Company. 

The steamer M. F. Plant, at present 
being overhauled at Neafie & Levy's ship- 
yard, at Philadelphia, Pa., has been 
turned over tc the Oregon Coal and 
Navigation Company, which recently 
purchased her from the Southern Steam- 
ship Company. She will leave in a few 
days for San Francisco. Captain Bird- 
sail, master of the Plant, turned her 
over to Captain Nelson, of San Fran- 
cisco, who went East from the Pacific 
Coast to take charge of her. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 

Lucky Proprietor. — Guest (in c 
restaurant). — "Here, waiter! This food 
is vile, and I don't propose to pay for it. 
Where's the proprietor?" 

Waiter — "He's gone borne to lunch, 
sir." 



Time and .Money. — Miss Romantique — 
"The foreign nobility, having nothing to 
do. niusi lead awfully monotonous lives." 

.\li-s Eostique— "Yes, I notice that 
those who come over here never seem 
l" have any change." 



Nothing but Memory. — "Pincher seems 
to be very charitable." 
'"What I Xonsense!" 
"Why lie says he always remembers the 

poor." 

"Well, it's merely a matter of mem- 
orj !" 



Ambiguous. — Nell — "Did he like the 
diets we sang?" 

Belle — "I can't tell from what he 
said." 

Nell — "Why, what did he say?" 

Belle — "He said I sang well, but that 
you were better still." 



In No Danger. — Nell — "Miss Anteck 
is the greatest one to worry about troub- 
les that are never likely to come to 
her." 

Belle — "Yes, she was wondering the 
other day if it's really true that there 
are microbes in kisses." 



Not the Same. — "Jack Nervy called on 
old Roxley last night and asked him for 
his daughter's hand." 

"That was brassy of him. What did 
the old man say?" 

"Said 'I'll compromise with you, young 
man. and give you my foot,' and he did." 



A Concession. — Henpeck — "My wife is 
getting real good with me these days. 
She lets me open all the mail that comes 
to the house." 

Meeker — "Including all the letters ad- 
dressed to her?" 

Henpeck — "Gracious ! No ! The letters 
addressed to me." 



Kept to Itself. — "This clock is of no 
use to me," said the customer. "I want 
you to take it back." 

"What's the matter with it?" asked 
the dealer. "It's warranted to keep good 
time." 

"That may be the trouble. It certain- 
ly doesn't give good time." 



LUNDSTROM'S 



UNION 

MADE 



$2.50 HATS 



MADE BY 



PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

r 1.1s Market Street, opposite Central 
Theater, and 005 Kearny Street. 



Country Orders solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
Club 



teuctf by Authority of th««~ ™ 

iwravmN^SH^iimMATioiui 



Established 

Over 

30 Years 

on the 

Pacific 

Coast 



Every Package bears 
the Union Isabel 




Union made 

Clot hi no 



I5SUED BYAIJmQRiTYtf 

mi 



i 



M*, 



REGISTERED 



cr 
o 



m 



We were one of the first firms in the 
United States to put the union label on our 
garments. As we manufacture our own 
stock, all our clothes bear the union label. 

Other stores in San Francisco have a few union-made lines 
to show union men. 

Every thing is union made in our establishment. 
In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a 
saving of middlemen's profits. 
Ready-made suits and overcoats from $10.00 to $35.00 
Made-to-measure clothes from $10.00 to $45. 00. 



tC 



S. IN. WOOD <& CO, 

740 Market St., San Francisco. 




James A* Sorensen Co* 

Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 

103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, Below Mission 

TELEPHONE JESSIE 2821 SAN FRANCISCO 

All Watch Eepairing Warranted for two years. Eyes Tested 
Free by an expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

The Big Jewelry Store 



SMOKERS 



See that this label ( in light blue ) 
appears on the box fromjwhich|you 
are served. 



(»pi i«M__ 

Kiued by Aytfiomy of Uie Ciear MUKers International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(DlS CfTllflfS %lKCv<o«at<«llnt««nn< iu» M feQlSS (MM! 
jWBTJIOl 'HdXttHMnS'imWuTHmLUWI* «ara •' crj4«W"» Ofvolei inuirt 

»Wr">BiHllVHOMi«iTtJI*ljnilil(tUlirUJ(.|iflll»RtlJf TMO!»n DmlnalllglM 

■Map— — »utiUW|w*M<— <aW 

Q. TtC (/]blfcu*4. fteattetd. 
* c.M.j.zrtf 



*T?S^"« ; fii" v<!*-'*,WW.^**."<,_>W.. *■*-. v.*"*:/ 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

Smoke Union -Made Cigars that Bear the 
Above Label 



(Otherwise known ns SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Hetween iKng and Berry Sts., San Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly UNION 
MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market prices give me a call. 
Do not make a mistake — LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




CnC BATTERY STREET 

WlIU COR. WASHINGTON STREET 

SWu.tom Hou.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest and best 
equipped private Nautical School In the United States, 
Graduates prepared lor the American and British 
Merchant Marine examinations. Warrant officers of 
the United States Navy prepared for examination for 
commissioned officers. Special course for cadets en- 
tering the United States Naval Academy and Ameri- 
can Merchant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a text book and guide 
for navigators, is now on sale at the school. Prospect- 
ive purchasers, or those Interested In navigation may 
call at the school and inspect them. The book is well 
bound, contains about 400 pages of readable matter. 
PRIOB 96.00 



At Hale's 

MEN'S SWEATERS, 
98c. 

Instead of $1.50— All Sizes. 

Swell sweaters, in black, navy 
and maroon, with double 
roll collars, heavy rib, nice- 
ly finished. Not a great 
number of them. That's 
the reason they are 98c. 
It's a "stock-rightening" 
movement. Don't be late. 

Men's Underwear, 

40c Garment 
Regular 60c value: cotton ribbed, 

comfortable, heavy and warm 
winter weight; form fitting. 
They're well made, witli covered 
seams; come in gray, blue and 
ecru. All sizes at 40c garment. 

■£ G'yg..-j"i i 

San Francisco's 

8-Hour Good Goods Store 

Market St., Near Sixth 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Sailors' and Firemen'* Clothing 

anil General Supplier. 



COLBY & FITZPATRICK 

\"V-i Steuurt Street, 

Bet Market & Mission, - San Francisco 



...SMOKE... 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNIONJVIADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY STREET. 



"LA CORTINA" 

clear UNION MADE Havana 

MASCOT) Best 5 cent 
BLUE CAP] Cigars 

FACTORY, 111 TURK STREET 



STILL ON DECK 



ED. ANDERSEN 



7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY 

LUMBER HOOKS 



Scotty's Milwaukee 
Sweaters and Jackets 

Have stood the test against all competitors 

Lake Faring Men All Knovr It. 

SWEATERS SENT 111 
MAIL, FOR 93.30 
Heivare of Imitations 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTY" 
III MENOMENEE ST., MILWAUKEE, WIS. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 











i 
























A Jo 


urnal of 


Seamen, 


by 


Seamen, 


for 


Seamc 


n. Our A 


im: The Brotherh 


ood of the Sea 




Our 


Motto: 


Justice 


■ by 


Organization. 


Vol. 


XVIII. 


No. 4. 








SAN 


FRANCISCO, 


WEDNESDAY, 


OCTOBER 


19, 


1904. 






Whole No. 888. 





AUSTRALIAN LABOR METHODS. 



Political Action Independent of Unions. 



Facts From Authoritative Sources. 



A COMMON recourse of the radical in the 
American labor movement is to refer his' 
hearers and. readers to the example of politi- 
cal action by the workers in other countries, Ger- 
many and Australasia especially. The enchantment 
that distance lends is important in the scheme of 
those who would divert the organized workers from 
the proper business of trade-unionism. For one 
thing, it is difficult to controvert the representations 
thus made, since one's belief in such matters is 
certain to be influenced by one's leanings toward this 
or that policy. The trade-unionist who believes in 
political action is naturally inclined to believe all 
that he hears about political action in other coun- 
tries, and vice versa in the case of the man who 
disbelieves in that policy. In the absence of facts 
it's all a matter of faith. So the political-actionist 
continues to cite the glorious deeds of the Buffering 
brothers in distant lands — the more distant the bet- 
ter for his purposes; while his opponent continues, 
witli equal confidence in his owrt faith and his hear- 
ers' ignorance, to deny the existence of political 
action among the trade-unionists of other countries. 

The Journal has never taken any stock in the 
frequent references to the political action of the 
organized workers in Europe and the Antipodes. Of 
course, our unbelief has rested partly upon presump- 
tion ; to some extent we have gone upon the theory 
that the principles of trade-unionism being univer- 
sal, they must prevail wherever the trade-union 
exists. However, the JoUBNAL'S skepticism has not 
been based entirely upon faith; it has had a sub- 
stantial justification in knowledge. Having been for 
many years in close and constant personal touch with 
the leading labor men and labor papers of other 
countries, we have gathered, by the processes of 
absorption and assimilation, a more or less definite 
and reliable idea of the truth regarding the political 
and other forms of activity among the world's work- 
ers. Such information as the JOURNAL has thus de- 
rived is all opposed to the theory of political action 
by the trade-unions, as expounded by the political- 
actionist in the United States. However much the 
reader may be inclined to discredit the results ar- 
rived at by the processes here described, it can not 
be doubted that they are, if only a little, more relia- 
ble than those obtained by the simple process of 
declaring that a thing is so because it ought to 
be so. 

Recognizing, as clearly as any of its critics might, 
the inadequacy of its information on the subject, the 
Journal some time ago set about making definite 
inquiries from authoritative sources. Among other 
lines of investigation, a number of questions were 



drafted and submitted to those of the Journal's for- 
eign correspondents deemed most competent to speak 
for the labor movement in their respective localities. 
It so happens that these correspondents are in most 
instances the recognized authorities among their 
respective associates, so that the replies tendered by 
them are in every sense reliable. 

In a recent issue (October 5) the Journal printed 
the substance of the information received regarding 
the German labor movement. The more important 
details contained in that article were supplied by 
Mr. C. Legien, Secretary of National Federation 
of Labor, a position analogous to, and in fact identi- 
cal with, that of Secretary of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. Secretary Legien informs us that the 
trade-union and political activities of the German 
workers are carried on by separate and distinct or- 
ganizations, and that "such separation is expedient 
for organizing purposes, because organizations which 
arc, formed for the struggle for higher wages should 
include all workers, and keep out none on account 
of political differences." 

'the Journal herewith submits the results obtained 
from inquiries made among the leading labor men 
in Australia and New Zealand. Among the questions 
addressed to our correspondents, were these: 

1. Do the unions elect representatives to political 
gatherings for the purpose of nominating candidates, 
etc.? 

2. Uo the unions pledge their members to support 
or oppose certain candidates at, the polls? 

3. State the methods by which the nominees of 
the Labor party are selected. 

4. What percentage of the unions supports I lie 
Labor party in an official way? 

5. What percentage of the total membership of 
all the unions is contained in the unions included in 
the foregoing inquiry? 

6. What proportion does the voting membership 
of the unions bear to the total voting strength of 
the community? 

The replies to these queries are herewith given. 
Mr. S;iin Smith, the Labor member of (lie Arbitration 
Court of New South Wales, writes: 

1 . No. 

2. Unions don't pledge their members as a body 
to support any Labor candidate. However, two im 
portani unions have rules pledging their members to 
Bupport the selected candidate, as their members 
principally select (lie candidates, namely, the Austra- 
lian Workers' Union (The Arbitration Court has 
recently ordered this union to strike from its Con 
stifution the political pledge feature, as a condition 
of securing the benefits of the Arbitration Act.— 
Ed.) and the Harrier Miners. The city and miners' 
unions encourage their members to join the local 
political leagues in flic electorates in which they 
reside, special facilities being offered to do so. 



3. Candidates are selected by the Electoral Branch 
League in each electorate where a Labor candidate 
is nominated. If no League exists the Central Execu- 
tive approves of candidates to contest such seats. 

-1. The great bulk of the unions officially support 
the Labor candidates by a Triennial Convention that 
is convened some weeks prior to the general elections 
to stir up all the Labor electors. Every union and 
Labor Political League sends a delegate to the Con- 
vention, which issues an appeal to the workers to 
vote for the Labor candidates. 

5. There are (is. (175 trade-unionists registered in 
the State (N. S. W. ) ; the number of votes secured 
by tlie Labor candidates at the last election was 
39,285. 

0. The total number of voters in New South Wales 
is 1270,081. The trade-unionists number 07,675. 

Mr. T. Lauder, editor of the Tocsin, of Melbourne, 
the leading labor paper in Victoria, replies as fol- 
lows: 



1. No; but members of unions 
political labor leagues. 

2. No. However, unionists 
consistently supporting Labor ca 

3. Methods differ slightly in 
lian States, though in principle 
In this State Labor nominees are 
of what is called the Political 
ratified by a central executive, 
themselves to the Labor platform 

4. Without immediate figures 
tion to answer. Approximately 

5. Approximately 40 per cent 
0. Roughly, as one to three 

elections give varying results. 



can do so through 

ire more and more 
ndidates. 

the various Austra- 
similar to Victoria. 
selected by branches 
Labor Council, and 
They must pledge? 

not an easy ques- 
two- thirds. 

although different 



' lion. Edward Tregear, Secretary for Labor, New 
Zealand, replies as follows: 

1. No. 

2. No. 

3. Through political committees and associations, 
such as the Liberal and Labor League, flu' Women's 
Political League, etc.: not. through industrial or 
trade unions. 

4. No percentage in an official way; 100 per cent 
unofficially. 

5. No reply. 

ti. Workers' unions, 27,642; employers' unions, 
3,070. Total electors on roll. 129,385. 

In substance these replies show that the trade 
unions in Hie localities represented by I lie writers do 
not take political action ill the sense suggested by 
the radical in the American labor movement. Upon 
this point, all three of the Journal's correspondents 
here quoted are emphatic and unanimous. Except in 

so far as official action IS implied by the election 
S delegate from each union to a triennial convention, 
which is done in \ew South Wales alone, the char- 
acter of the political action taken by I lie trade 
unionists of Australia and New Zealand is cssen 
tially individualistic thai is, it is action by the 

individual rather than In I lie union. The fact that 

_lie.il unanimity exists a Cg the organized workers 

on political questions, Hie fact that, as in New 

Zealand, LOO per cent of the hide unionists unoffi- 
cially support the respective Labor or Labor and 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Libera] candidates, does not change the character of 
their action; it still remains individual action so far 
as the trade-unions are concerned. 

In addition to his categorical replies. Secretary 
Tregear lias favored the Journal with a letter con- 
taining much valuable and interesting data concern- 
ing the labor and political affairs of New Zealand, 
which is herewith published in full, as follows: 

Department of Labor, 

Wellington, May 18, 1904. 
Editor Coast Seamen's Journal: 

1 am much obliged to you for your kindness in 
sending me a list of questions on socio-political sub- 
ject--. S<> much hazy misstatement gathers about 
our New Zealand legislation and its effects that I 
am grateful when 1 get an opportunity of explana- 
tion and public attention. 

We have no Labor party in the ordinary sense of 
the word, neither in Parliament nor in the political 
arena. This may seem strange, since our country 
is spoken of as the place where "Labor is King." 
The Tories were wrecked (in 1890) by an alliance 
between Labor and Liberalism. This means thai 
skilled and unskilled labor became allied with farm- 
ers and with professional and commercial people of 
progressive and enlightened ideas. There has never 
been a Larger Dumber of Labor members in our 
House of Representatives than ten or twelve, i. e.. 
Labor members belonging to the working classes, and 
with the working-class interests professedly taking 
precedence of all others. 

In the present Parliament I do not think there 
are more than three or four such members in a 
House of seventy-four. Jt was found to be unneces- 
sary. A bootmaker, a sailor, a foundryman — these 
are nearly all our present Labor members in the 
lower House. But — and it is a large "but" — almost 
every member of the House has been a workingman. 
The Premier was an engineer, the Minister for Public 
Works a carpenter, the Minister for Railways a tele- 
graph operator; the Government whips were small 
farmers, and so on. Almost every man in the House 
has been "through the mill'' of hard work and pio- 
neering troubles. Therefore there is a sympathy with 
labor questions which only reflects the opinions of 
electorates composed iti vast majority (as in every 
other country) of workingmen and women. This has 
hitherto made it unnecessary to evolve an inde- 
pendent Labor party. 

The position lias had immense advantages. The 
workingmen in the House are listened to with earnest 
attention because they voice the opinions of those 
who really rule the Colony through the ballot-box. 
Nevertheless, there has not been found a necessity 
for having many workingmen representatives, since 
I he others, the Liberals, are staunch and trustworthy 
allies. I need not say that our Liberals are not the 
Liberals of Great Britain, who are only a wing of 
the capitalistic interest. 

( >f course, our line of action works two ways. 
When the Liberals wished for measures giving help 
to farmers, extending commerce, etc., they could 
count on the support of labor both inside and outside 
of Parliament. The Advances to Settlers Act, which 
allows the Government to borrow large sums of 
money in the Old Country at low rates of interest 
(because of national security), and loan this to 
struggling settlers so as to enable them to pay oft 
heavy mortgages owing to private money-lenders, 
is one of such Acts. The Lands for Settlement 
Act, which allows the Government to compulsorily 
take over large, fertile private estates and cut them 
up in small farms to lease to poor men, is another. 
Then, in return, the Liberals vote for measures such 
as Workmen's Compensation for Accidents, and im- 
proved factory laws, industrial arbitration, old-age 
pensions, wages protection, shearers' accommodation, 
eli.. statutes almost wholly benefiting workingmen. 
The rule appears to be, "take wide and enlightened 
views," and each party has benefited enormously. 
Now and then some irresponsible person in the labor 
ranks gets up and declares that there shall be an 
Independent Labor party, but it always comes to 
nothing; the alliance has done and is doing too good 
work to be lightly dissolved. 

In New Zealand we have no race difficulty or racial 
divisions in the industrial or political world. Our 
foreign element, the Maori, does not enter into in- 
dustrial life to any extent, although the Maori sheep- 
shearers (they are very good at shearing) have actu- 
ally formed a trade-union. Wc have Germans, Danes 
and Italians, but only in small numbers. The Ger- 
mans and Danes melt into the Anglo-Saxon com- 
munity at once, and are indistinguishable in the sec- 
ond generation; good settlers they are, too. The 
I Lilians do not merge so soon; they are mostly fisher- 
men, who live in little clusters and hang on to their 
own language longer than Germans or Scandinavians. 
We have not many Chinese; they are getting fewer 
every day because as they die off or go home, the 
heavy poll-tax of $500 each on landing keeps others 
from coming to replace them. 

We in this colony watch the American movements 
with hopeful, friendly, but very anxious eyes. Your 
forces are so large, your interests so enormous com- 
pared with ours, that we recognize how solemn and 
responsible a trust the directors of labor in the 
I nited States have in their hands, and what pigmy 
efforts ours are. Nevertheless, we are animated by 
the same spirit, the desire to better the lot of those 
men on whose toil the whole superstructure of society 
res ts Yours faithfully, 

EDWARD TREGEAR, 

Secretary for Labor. 

Secretary Tregear's description of the political 
situation in New Zealand will doubtless prove a reve- 



lation to many American readers, accustomed as they 
are to "much hazy misstatement" from press and 
platform. Who is not familiar with the statement, 
published almost every day. that the New Zealand 
Parliament contains SIXTY-EIGHT Labor members? 
Secretary Tregear places the number at three or 
four! The American reformer's figures can hardly 
be described as "hazy misstatement;" sheer nonsense 
would be the more fitting term. Yet the statement, 
regarding the personnel of the New Zealand Parlia- 
ment is probably no more absurd than most other 
statements on the same genera] subject. 

Indeed, as the Journal has previously observed, 
the thing that most strongly impresses one upon 
investigation of the facts is the oimil-irity in the 
methods adopted by trade-unionists in all parts of 
the world, particularly in respect to their abstention, 
as trade-unionists, from any species of polities. This 
similarity is but natural, after all. since trade-union- 
ism itself is the same thing at all times and in all 
pl.ic es. 

Thai which the political-actionist conceives to be a 

difference between trade-union methods in the United 
States and in other countries is merely a difference 
between individual understanding and agreement. In 
a word, the trade-unionists of other countries 
Australia and New Zealand, are of a common mind 
as to their individual duty in politics; whereas those 
of the United States are divided into as many parts 
as there are brands of reform on the political market, 
a condition for which the political-actionist is him 
self mainly responsible. However, there remain- to 
the trade-unionist the consoling reflection that al- 
though wc can't do politics "as fchej do in Austra- 
lia," we can do trade-unionism with the best of them 
in any part of the world, which is the main thing 
when all'- said and done. 



Australian Notes. 



(For the Coast Seamen's Journal.) 



The Watson Labor Government came to 
an end in the Federal Parliament over the 
"Preference to Unionists" clause, being de- 
feated by a combination of anti-unionists 
consisting chiefly of the Reid and Deakin- 
Mc Lean-Turner sections of the Opposition. 
Their combined forces numbered only two 
votes more than those of the Watson sup- 
porters. 

Mr. J. C. Watson tendered his resignation 
and suggested a dissolution to the Governor- 
General, which was declined. Mr. G. H. 
Reid was commissioned to form a new Gov- 
ernment, which, after a few days, he accom- 
plished, taking as his colleagues Sir George 
Turner, Mr. Allan McLean and Mr. McCay 
(the mover of the amendment that wrecked 
the Watson Government), all Victorians; 
Sir Josiah Symons, South Australia ; Mr. 
Dugald Thomson and Mr. Sydney Smith, 
New South Wales, and Mr. Drake, of 
Queensland, who has been in all the Govern- 
ments (except the Labor one) since the for- 
mation of the Federal Parliament. Western 
Australia could not have a representative, as 
all the members, or at any rate the majority, 
are Labor members. 

During the interval elapsing between the 
adjournment and the re-assembling of the 
House Reid and Deakin, who had refused a 
portfolio, delivered several addresses to the 
Victorians, and Reid issued addresses to the 
Electors, outlining his policy as being one 
to combat the socialistic aspirations of the 
Labor party, and the cementing of a better 
feeling between the communities of the dif- 
ferent States, principally Victoria and New 
South Wales. He indulged in a heap of spe- 
cious platitudes concerning his desire to se- 
cure constitutional Government and afford 
freer opportunities to the commercial classes 
to work out their own destiny, unhampered 



or unfettered by irritating legislative meas- 
such as the "White Australia," white 
crews on mail steamers, stringent adminis- 
tration of the Customs (a la C. C. King- 
ston ). 

Premier Reid will be prepared to promise 
any mortal thing to the man or men he thinks 
lias power and the press behind him or them. 
He has been doing this ever since he has 
become a public man, and will continue to 
the end. He has now attained his ambition, 
the Federal Premiership, but may not retain 
it long, as already Mr. J. C. Watson, as 
leader of an alliance formed of the Labor 
party and the Liberal Protectionists, among 
whom are Messrs. Isaacs, Sir William Lyne 
and Manger, has offered a motion of "no 
confidence," which will be debated next Tues- 
day, the 20th. Opinions vary as to the suc- 
cess or failure af the motion; some of the 
prophets expect that it may be so close that 
the casting vote of the Speaker will decide 
the verdict. 

Since the Reid Government got to busi- 
m ss on the 7th of the present month it has 
put through the mutilated Arbitration bill, 
sending it on to the Senate, where it may 
be further mangled if the Reid administra- 
tion survives the censure debate. 

Considerable activity is being displayed 
among the farmers, producers and property 
holders in Victoria and New South Wales, 
beine urejed on bv the inflammatory and mis- 
leading addresses of Reid and Deakin to 
organize for the suppression of the labor and 
socialistic influences in the country, also to 
secure the return of Parliamentary repre- 
sentatives in opposition to the Labor mem- 
ber.-, who are alleged to wield too much 
power in the Legislatures of the Common- 
wealth. This will only supply the necessary 
stimulus to arouse the workers in the two 
most laggard States, Victoria and New South 
Wales. In South Australia the farmers are 
disposed to amalgamate with the Laborites. 
West Australia has already returned a Labor 
Government, and Queensland, under its in- 
effective franchise, returned a preponderance 
of Labor members. So, with a reformed 
franchise, the Labor people will sweep the 
electorate, as Reid and his confreres seem to 
make converts around the cities of Melbourne 
and Sydney only, where the papers boom 
them extensively. 

Our State Ministry will shortly get to 
work to try and initiate its alleged reforms, 
which consist of financial economy and set- 
tlement of the land, a perennial subject. 
The session will be short and serve as an 
excuse why little hits been done before the 
recess. The latter will take the Ministry 
over to the middle of next year and help 
it to evolve some fresh projects to delude 
the people, or keep them interested, and if 
the seasons are propitious the Government 
will ascribe the prosperity to its benign ad- 
ministration. It is rumored that the metro- 
politan newspapers will have the concession 
of free carriage of their journals on the 
State railways. This privilege was with- 
drawn from them by the late Government 
and, in the opinion of many, is believed to 
have been responsible for the violent opposi- 
tion experienced by the Labor Government. 
(Continued on page 0.) 









COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






: i\ the Atlantic Coast. : 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union*. I 



»<SxS><£><S>3><sx$>3xSxSxS><S><**^^ 



Illegal Allotments. 

The most important function of a gov- 
ernment is the enforcement of law. Were 
our Government to do its duty in this respect 
all would be well. But long experience 
shows that the enforcement of law is either 
neglected altogether, if that be possible, or 
done in a perfunctory manner. Indeed, the 
actions of the Government in this respect 
often seem to justify the saying that "laws 
are made to be broken." 

A good illustration of the point here 
raised is afforded by the seamen's allotment 
laws. Subdivision b of Section 10 of the 
Revised Statutes provides, in part, as fol- 
lows: 

But no allotment whatever shall be allowed in the 
trade between the ports of the United States (except 
as provided in subdivision c of this section) or in 
trade between ports of the United States and the 
Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the West Indies 
and Mexico. 

The reference to "subdivision c" calls at- 
tention to the fact that the trade between 
the United States ports on the Atlantic 
Coast and the ports on the Pacific Coast is 
exempted from the provisions contained in 
the quoted portion of subdivision b. This 
law has been in force nearly six years, and 
it is no exaggeration to say that in all that 
time there has never been a day, excepting 
Sundays, possibly, when it has not been vio- 
lated in some seaport or other of the United 
States. It is literally regarded as a dead 
letter in every port on the Atlantic Coast 
at which the seamen's unions have no repre- 
sentative; and even where these organiza- 
tions are represented, it is often evaded 
through collusion with the Federal officials 
appointed to enforce this and other laws. 
The offense is aggravated by the invariable 
practice of cashing the allotment notes im- 
mediatly after — and frequently before — the 
vessel leaves port, thus violating subdivision 
a of the section above referred to, which 
reads : 

Section 10. (a) That it shall be, and is hereby, 
made unlawful in any case to pay any seaman wages 
in advance of the time when he has actually earned 
the same, or to pay such advance wages to any other 
person. Any person paying such advance wages shall 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon con- 
viction shall be punished by a fine of not less than 
four times the amount of the wages so advanced, and 
may also be imprisoned for a period not exceeding six 
months, at the discretion of the Court. The payment 
of such advance wages shall in no case, excepting as 
herein provided, absolve the vessel or the master or 
owner thereof from full payment of wages after the 
same shall have been actually earned, and shall be 
no defense to a libel suit, or action for the recovery 
of such wages. 

It will thus be seen that the practice of 
paying allotment to seamen engaged in the 
coastwise trade, and the trade to near-by 
foreign countries, is a misdemeanor. Tbat 
practice is of almost daily occurrence, and 
the offenders are neither fined nor jailed. 
In fact, the violation of the law is regarded 
as of no consequence whatever — a mere in- 
cident in the routine business of chartering 
and running ships. If an attempt is made 
to bring the guilty parties to bar, and if 



tbeir guilt should by some chance be proven, 
they usually manage to wriggle out of it by 
blaming the whole thing on the crimps. The 
"discretion of the Court" does the rest. It 
is a curious fact, too, that these same masters 
and vesselowners, presumably to show that 
they are law-abiding citizens, are always 
active in seeing to it that any infractions 
of the laws by seamen are promptly pun- 
ished. 

There is a Latin saw which, freely trans- 
lated, says: "The law takes no cognizance 
of unimportant matters." It would seem 
from the attitude of the Government that it 
considers the rights of seamen of too little 
importance to warrant enforcing the law for 
their protection. This impression may be 
wrong — we hope it is — but just the same the 
average seaman has about as much faith 
in the sincerity of the Government and its 
willingness to do what is right by him, as 
he has in the beautiful legend that it is "a 
government of the people, by the people, 
for the people," etc. If the Government 
would redeem itself in the eyes of seamen 
it ought to "get busy" with the Seamen's bill 
introduced in the House last March by Rep- 
resentative Livernash, of California. 



It is really astonishing the way many ap- 
parently bright and intelligent writers still 
keep harping on the proposition that organ- 
ized labor, as such, should go into politics. 
They seem to be under the impression that 
because men can agree on' one or two things 
they can agree on all things. Such views 
can only acquire consistency when held by 
men to whom a theory is always more real 
than its co-related conditions. Politics is to 
social ethics what religion is to moral ethics. 
Therefore, it would be just as sensible for 
the aforementioned writers to insist that or- 
ganized labor should "go into religion." 
When we reflect that politics and religion 
have been the two most prolific sources of 
strife among men ever since the dawn of 
history we get an idea of the monumental 
shortsightedness of those who advise an or- 
ganized body of workingmen, representing 
within its membership every political creed 
under the sun, to "go into politics." 



Apparently it has not occurred to the ad- 
vocates of a preferential tariff on goods im- 
ported in American bottoms that the United 
States is at present the largest exporter of 
goods in the world, and that if some of the 
maritime nations to whom we are now ex- 
porting our goods were to retaliate in kind 
it would be all up with our transatlantic and 
transpacific steamship lines, not to mention 
the few sailing vessels which are still doing 
duty in the oversea trade. "Freeze out" on 
tho high seas is a game that more than one 
nation can play at. 



To Single Taxers. 

The writer who presides over this depart- 
ment of the Coast Seamen's Journal is an 
earnest believer in the Single Tax, and would 
fain do everything in his power to bring 
about its realization. He is sorry, therefore, 
to note the unreasoning stand against organ- 
ized labor taken by many prominent single 
taxers. Organized labor is not a perfect in- 
stitution, and none are so well aware of that 
fact as those most intimately connected with 
it. It has often erred, and sometimes 
seriously ; but, at any rate, it has accom- 
plished some of the things it stands for. 
There is not the least question but that every 
material advantage secured by workingmen 
in the past thirty years or more has been 
directly due to the efforts of organized labor. 
Wages have been increased and the hours of 
labor reduced in a manner that has upset 
all the theories of economists. Hundreds of 
legislative measures safeguarding the lives, 
health and comfort of the millions of men, 
women and children have been wrung from 
unwilling legislators through the mere power 
of organization. Hundreds of unjust laws 
have been repealed by the same agency, and 
the standard of living has been greatly im- 
proved. All these are accomplished facts to 
which organized labor may justly "point 
with pride." 

An organization of men, like an individ- 
ual, must stand upon its record and be 
judged thereby. A tree is known by its fruit. 
It is now twenty-five years since "Progress 
and Poverty" was first published, and seven 
years since Henry George died ; yet the 
Single Tax movement is to-day in a more 
backward state than at any time almost since 
its inception. It has, so far, not accom- 
plished a single thing of importance, nor is 
its present attitude such as to inspire a hope 
that it ever will accomplish anything. The 
reasons for this poor showing are not far to 
seek. The leaders of the Single Tax move- 
ment have persistently refused to avail them- 
selves of that force which since the beginning 
of the world has been at the back of every 
successful reform movement, the power of 
organization. Instead of railing against or- 
ganized labor, they should learn a lesson 

IV ils way of doing things. Only through 

systematic and thorough organization on the 
part of its believers can the Single Tax theory 
ever ho realized. There is positively no 
other way, and the sooner the single taxers 
begin to understand this the sooner will the 
end I hey are striving for be attained. It 
will certainly never be attained by following 
the lead of a few academic dreamers to whom 
theory is everything and practice good only 
when it fits the theory. 



Often the cause of true reform would be 
best subserved by simply going back to first 
principles. 



Character is of more importance than 
brains and should be cultivated above all 
else. Want of character, rather than want 
of brains, is responsible for all that is un- 
desirable in our public life and institutions. 
(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 



Home News. 



Mayor Harrison, of Chicago, has oj 
dered the Chicago Union Traction Com- 
pany to cease operating cars on several 
^i reel b. 

The [nterstate Commerce Commission 
reports thai 9,984 lives were lost in the 

United States last year by accidents on 

railroads. 

President Roosevelt on October In an- 
nounced the appointment of Robert J. 
Wynne. Acting Postmaster-General, a> 
Postmaster-* leneral. 

Representatives of the Mormon Church 
of Utah are negotiating for the purchase 
of i tracl of 300,000 acres of laud in tin 
State of Tabasca, Mexico. 

Twenty-nine persons were killed and 
~i\i\ injured by a collision of Missouri 
I a; ill: trains three nubs east of \\ .1 
rensburg, Mo., on October 10. 

Chairman Taggart, of the National 
Democratic Committee, lias announced 
thai Judge Parker will not make any 
formal speeches during the campaign. 

The annual report of the Surgeon 
General of the United States Army 

shows that the health of the soldiers 

has improved under better sanitary reg- 
ulations. 

A report to the International Peace 
Congress at Boston recommended that 
nations refuse further loans to Russia 
and Japan as a means of effecting an 
end to the war. 

Italian women, excited by rumor- of 
a ••black hand" plot against a public 
school in New York, recently mobbed the 
building, and police had to be called to 
drive their. awa\ . 

Governor Bates of Massachusetts, on 
October 1-. appointed former Governor 

\V. .Murray Crane, of Dalton. United 
States Senator to till the unexpired term 

of George F. Hoar, recently deceased. 
By a vote of 36 to 31 the Chicago City 

Council recently refused to direct the 

Election Commissioners to include on 

the ballots the question: "Shall the city 

of Chicago proceed to operate street rail- 
ways T" 

Bartonville, 111., with a population of 
300, ia said to be the only incorporated 
town in the United States that docs not 
have to lew a tax. Its source of reve- 
nue is $4,080 collected annually in -ahum 
license-. 

In a public speech delivered before the 
American Street Railway Association, at 
St. Louis, Mo.. President Francis de 
.dared that the Exposition had lost at 
least $1,000,000 through being compelled 

to close Sunday-. 

The German Emperor's gift to the 
American people of a bronze statue of 
Frederick the Great will be unveiled by 
Baroness Speck von Sternberg, the tier- 
man EmbaSSadreSS, on the esplanade of 
the Army War College on November 1!>. 

The city of Baltimore, Md., has sold 
$300,000 of securities for $341,767.26 

They bear :'.'._. per cent interest, and the 

price is at the rate oi 2.87 per cent. 
which is said to be a better rate than 
that of uiy -ah' heretofore made by a 
municipality. 

The official statement issued bj the 
St. Louis Exposition ahows that the at- 
tendance on Chicago Bay. which was 
observed on October 8. was 163,517, and 
the attendance for the week ending on 

that day was 880,954. The total at- 
tendance since the opening of the Ex- 
position was 13,376,456. 

\\ . S. Champ, Secretary of William 
Zeigler, and who had charge of the 
unsuccessful Frithjof party sent to 
search for the America exploring party 
in the Arctic regions, has just returned 
from Europe. He -ays: "The ne 
pedition will start next June, but it is 
ju-t possible that, the America will re- 
lc.i-e herself this month, although 1 do 
not think anything will be heard from 
her until next year. There is no cause 
for anxiety about her fate." 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANT'S 

CLOTHIN 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Iiest Goods Manufactured for 

Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUK GOODS ALSO 



lippmain bros. 

New Clothing Store 

Goods Direct from the Factory. 
UINIOIN STORE UfSIOIN GOODS 

Wleldwald Block, Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAIN PEDRO, CAL,. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

Wholesale Dealer In the Choicest of Old Wines 

and Liquors 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at the lowest San Francisco prices. 
We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

II. a. on Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
a little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spending 
all you earn, but save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 
splendid opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San 
Francisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that. We offer you lots on 
graded streets with cement sidewalks and curbs, trees planted and water laid 
in, from $350 to $450, at the exceptionally easy terms of $25 cash and $10 
per month until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for 
your lot it will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity 
slip by, but see John Anderson, next door to the new postoffice. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



JOHN HELANDER 

— Dealer in — 
FOBEIGN AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CIGARS 

Fourth Street, near Beaeon, 

San Pedro, Cal. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Hendquartern for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicine*, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT STREET, OI'P. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAN PEDRO, CAT.. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

MMli nnd Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

— Dealers in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Herald and all San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

BRAND & LAWYER 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausage if all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by U. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 



Q. W. HARVEY 

The old Time Expressman 

Solicits Your Patronage. 

Give Him a Call. 

Stand at Front St., San Pedro, Cal. 



FRED SYENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 
AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELIAS WEBEBG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDBO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, 
Notions, Etc. 



People's Bargain Store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents* Furnishing? Goods, Boots and 
Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Oat-Ma. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 
I int.. Front nnd Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



S. W. Express 

HANS HENRIKSEN, Proprietor. 

Give your old Comrade a call 
when in San Pedro 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr 

— Dealer In — 

GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN, also GREEN 

FRUITS and COUNTRY PRODUCE 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL 



-OK THE- 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



ISTEV 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 
stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
in It. The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 
four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits, lnprincipled manufacturers are 
using them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOB, Secretary, 11 W'averly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION L4BEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
MATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Xext door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union 
Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis. 



F. W. Eisenbeis. 



EISENBEIS <* SON 

— Dealers in — 
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Crackers. 

Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
316 Water St. Port Tovrnsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Tragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Cood, Pres 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co, inc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Burtlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS 

IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest and 
fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

— Dealer In — 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
818 Water St.. next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Dealers in LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS and 

VEGETABLES. Wholesale and Retail. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

— Dealer in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 
Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Tom Courtney, of Courtmac3herry, 
County Cork, Ireland, is inquired for by 
t ne British Consulate at San Francisco, 
Cal. 

William Hansen, a cook who left the 
schooner Ethel Zane about three months 
ago in Everett, Wash., is inquired for 
by his wife. Any one knowing of his 
whereabouts please address Box 2155, 
San Pedro, Cal. 

The following nam< I Beamen are in- 
quired for by the Consulate of Sweden 
an<l Norway at San Francisco: Harry 
Xilsen, from Asker ; Williaw Anderson, 
from Stockholm; Emil Swanson, from 
Gothenburg ; E, G. Perssom, from Goth- 
enburg; Johan Emil Engebrektooo, from 
Gothenburg; George Nordstrom, from 
I liri-tiania; Jacob II. Dalland, from 
Siglevikj Olof M. Nelson, from Sweden; 
Frithjof BUingsen, from Drammen; Jo- 
hannes Gudmundsen, from Stavaii^cr ; 
K. A. Kolderup Wessel, from (hi is 

tiania; Julian Sander Peterson, fr 

Biuiinefjall; Ed. B. Herwan, from Stock- 
holm; Edwin Bredesen, from Chris- 
tiania; Gustav Hansen, from Aak> 
Martin Olsen, from Vatteroea; John E. 
W. Johanson, from Kastlosa; F. M. Lof- 
berg, from Partille. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^•V--«k-^->v>,.-^-V'V 




Pacific Coast Marine. 



^ 

op 



Healy, Tibbetts & Co., of San Francisco, have been 
awarded a contract to construct a new beacon in 
Mare Island Straits. 

The Navy Department lias postponed until October 
29 the opening of bids for the completion of the 
Mare Island (Cal.) dry-dock. 

Boatswain Williams, of the steamer George W. 
Elder, was drowned by falling overboard from that 
vessel while crossing the Columbia River bar on Octo- 
ber 11. 

The steamer Nome City, known as one of the best 
passenger vessels on the northern coast, is to be 
converted into a steam-schooner for the Coast lumber 
trade. She will have a capacity for 1,100,000 feet. 

The schooner Del Norte arrived at San Francisco 
on October 8 from Siuslaw, Or., with a cargo of lum- 
ber. The schooner sprung a leak shortly after leav- 
ing port and it was necessary to keep the crew con- 
tinually at the pumps all the way down the Coast. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 
12 reported that the British ship Corunna, which 
went ashore at Miramar, on the east coast of South 
America, had been floated and was being towed to 
Montevideo. 

Large fields of ice off Cape Horn for fifteen days 
were reported by the French bark Bidart, Captain 
Pinsonet, which arrived at San Francisco on October 
11, 152 days from Glasgow, Scotland, with a cargo of 
1,600 tons of coal. 

The total receipts of salmon from Alaska at San 
Francisco by sea to date amount to 1,034,614 cases 
and 9,702 barrels. Very few vessels of the salmon 
licet are still to arrive from the North, and these 
are now almost due. 

The American ship Elwell arrived at San Francisco 
on October 15, seventy days from Newcastle, Aus., in 
charge of First-Mate Burke, Captain A. W. F. Street 
having left the vessel without explanation as she 
was leaving the latter port. 

The Bureau ol Equipment of the Navy Department 
is arranging for an important experiment in wire- 
less telegraphy on the Pacific Coast for the purpose 
of ascertaining the best possible site for a station on 
the Farallones, off San Francisco. 

A Tacoma (Wash.) stevedoring firm has loaded the 
German ship Peru with 124,857 bushels of wheat in 
seventeen hours, an average of 7,344 bushels an hour. 
It is considered a record-breaker. The ship is under 
charter for the United Kingdom. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 13 
from Hongkong, by way of London, reports that an 
unknown ship, laden with lumber, was wrecked and 
totally lost on August 26 at Chetang Point, on the 
China coast. All on board are supposed to have been 
lost. 

The steamer M. F. Plant, recently purchased at 
Philadelphia by Goodall, Perkins & Co., of San Fran- 
cisco, put into Norfolk, Va., recently, on account of 
her evaporator being out of order. Repairs were 
made and the steamer resumed her voyage to San 
Francisco. 

News was received at San Francisco on October 14 
from Wellington, N. Z., by way of London, that a 
vessel, supposed to be the barkentine Addenda, from 
Lyttleton for Newcastle, Aus., is stranded at Palliser 
Bay. The vessel, according to the telegram, will 
probably be got off. 

A cargo of 223,000 codfish arrived at San Francisco 
on October 11 in the schooner Metha Nelson, thirty- 
seven days from the Okhotsk Sea. No news of the 
whaling fleet was brought by the schooner. The first 
of the sperm and right whalers is expected at San 
Francisco from the Okhotsk Sea about October 25. 

What appears to have been a disaster to some large 
vessel is reported from Pachena Bay, B. C. A ves- 
sel's figurehead, life-size, in the form of a woman, 
painted light blue, and part of a bowsprit have been 
recovered by Indians, with other wreckage, not yet 
described, while several broken oars have been picked 
up along the beach. 

Sickness among the crew has interrupted the voy- 
age of the British bark Troop, bound from Manila. 
P. I., for Delaware Breakwater. The vessel is re- 
ported to have been spoken on August 23 in latitude 
19 degrees north, longitude 121 degrees east, in want 
of medical attention, the crew sick and the bark re- 
turning to Hongkong. 

The Collector of Customs at San Francisco has 
been notified by Secretary of the Treasury Shaw to 
allow the claim of $100 exempt goods in cases when 
the incoming passenger failed to make declaration. 
'this will hold good pending the appeal in the case of 
Captain W. W. Harts from the decision of United 
States District Judge De Haven to the United States 
Circuit Court of Appeals. 

The barkentine Coronado, Captain Potter, arrived 
at San Francisco on October 7 from Honolulu, after 
a long trip of thirty-nine days, with a cargo of 22,000 
bags of sugar. This is the record slow trip of the 
year from the Islands. Ordinarily the run from 
Honolulu by the Coronado would be made in no more 
than twenty days. Light winds and calms were re- 
sponsible for the slow passage. 

Following is the reinsurance li-t. as posted at San 
Francisco on October 17: German -hip Sirene, 140 
days from Liverpool for Valparaiso, 50 per cent ; 
British ship Andreta, 167 days from Sydney for Fal- 
mouth. 10 per cent; British bark Elvion. 120 days 
from 
shi 
Delaware Breakwater, 5 per cent. 

Twenty-two days from Honolulu, T. H., the bark- 
entine Archer arrived at San Francisco on October 14 



louui. lu per rem.; umu^ji u«i» "'"»"! " .' 

om Liverpool for Valparaiso, 5 per cent; Italian 
lip Rosalia D'Ali, 155 days from New Caledonia for 



with 22,685 bags of sugar. She was in a very heavy 
westerly gale on October 10, and on the following 
day, in latitude 37 degrees 43 minutes north, longi- 
tude 131 degrees 10 minutes west, sighted the Ger- 
man bark Steinhek steering for San Francisco with 
one of her topgallant masts gone. 

To prevent reconstruction of condemned life-pre- 
servers, Supervising Inspector of Hulls and Boilers 
Bermingham has issued a circular addressed to heads 
of steamer companies. The particular violation of 
law aimed at is the taking of condemned preservers 
stamped by the Inspectors "condemned" and recover- 
ing them with new canvas. This practice is attribut- 
ed to several firms in San Francisco. 

The steamer M. F. Plant has been purchased on 
the Eastern coast by Goodall, Perkins & Co., of San 
Francisco, and is reported to have sailed from Phila- 
delphia on October 8, under command of Captain H. 
C. Nelson, late of the steamer Areata. The vessel 
was first known as the Cocoa, later as the Argonauta, 
and still later as the Cuba, before being named M. F. 
Plant. She is 941 net tons register, and is 205.4 
feet long, with a breadth of 36 feet and depth of 25 
feet. Her passenger accommodations are said to be 
attractive. 

To the surprise of speculators, advices were received 
at San Francisco on October 11 from Lloyd's in Lon- 
don reporting the arrival at their destinations of the 
long-overdue British schooner Advance, sixty-eight 
days out from a Mississippi port for La Guayra, 
Venezuela, and the Italian bark Gaetano Casabona, 
110 days out from Sydney for Table Bay. In the 
case of the Advance the surprise was particularly no- 
ticeable, for while comparatively little speculation 
had taken place on the vessel, the general belief pre- 
vailed that the schooner had long ago been at the 
bottom. The rate of 35 per cent had been quoted on 
the hitter vessel. 

The trial trip of the new steam-schooner Harold 
Dollar was made on San Francisco Bay on October 
13. A speed of ten and one-eighth knots per hour 
was made. She will go into service in a few days. 
The Harold Dollar is 203 feet long, 39 feet beam, by 
16 feet depth of hold, or two feet deeper than any 
other steam-schooner yet constructed on the Coast. 
Her engines, which were built and installed by the 
Risdon Iron Works, are of the triple-expansion type, 
high pressure thirteen inches, intermediate twenty- 
one inches, low pressure twenty-four inches stroke. 
The Dollar is by far the most substantial vessel of 
her class yet built, and embodies in her construction 
all the points that experience has shown to be neces- 
sary and desirable. 

United States Supervising Inspector John Berm- 
ingham, of San Francisco, has approved the decision of 
Local Inspectors Byron Whitney and Robert Turney, of 
Si attic, Wash., in' the case of the steamer Clallam, 
which sank between Port Townsend and Victoria last 
winter, with great loss of life. Captain George Rob- 
ertson is adjudged guilty of gross negligence and his 
license suspended for twelve months, while the license 
of the chief-engineer, Scott A. Delaunay is revoked 
for gross negligence and incompetence. An investiga- 
tion showed that a deadlight had been defective and 
that the engineer had not reported it for fear of 
being discharged by the Company. The excuse put 
forward by Delaunay was characterized by Inspector 
Bermingham as the "merest twaddle." 

Word is brought from Japan by the America Maru 
that the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, operating the Japanese 
line between San Francisco and the Orient, contem- 
plates building two new 15,000-ton steamers in Japan 
to take the places of the Nippon Maru and Hongkong 
Maru, both of which were impressed into transport 
service at the beginning of the war against Russia. 
The new steamers are to be at least equal in size to 
the Mongolia and Manchuria, of the Pacific Mail line, 
and the material for their construction will be pur- 
chased in England and the United States. The Toyo 
Kisen Kaisha, it is further reported, has lately paid 
an annual dividend of 12 per cent, despite its light 
business with this coast. Some considerable revenue 
was derived from the Japanese Government in return 
for the loss of the Nippon Maru and Hongkong Maru. 



DIED. 

Erick Nabbe, No. 505, a native of Finland, aged 27. 
died at San Francisco, Cal.. October II, 1904. 



The following members of the Fishermen's Union of 
the Pacific ('oast and Alaska are reported dead: 

Otto Na^s, No. 45, a native of Finland, aged 28, 
died at San Francisco, Cal., October 10, 1904. 

Martin Taprell, No. 68, a native of Finland, aged 
:;_' drowned at Fort Wrangel, Alaska, July 28, 1904. 



F R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine 
law in this city. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Rooms 8 and 10, 508 California 
street. Telephone Grant 163. 

Geo. E. Nalder, a member of the Sailors' Union, 
No. 555, is inquired for. Anyone knowing anything 
as to his present whereabouts please notify the 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



BagleVa Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches, and 
♦ be fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 







vi/vi/ 


OFFICIAL 





SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 18, 1904. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping dull. A donation of $50 was made to the 
striking Leather Workers and Hat and Cap Makers, 
of San Francisco. The report submitted by the Joint 
Committee on Arrangements for the International 
Seamen's FJnion of America convention was adopted. 
A resolution asking for the exclusion of Japanese 
and Koreans was adopted and ordered submitted to 
the San Francisco Labor Council and the coming 
American Federation of Labor convention. 

Notice. — The election of delegates to the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America convention will be 
held in the regular meetings held at Headquarters 
and agencies on October 31, 1904. 

A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sis. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping very dull; 
prospects poor. 

H. L. Petterso.x, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Red 208. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western a ve. P. O. Box 65. Tel . Ja mes 303 1 . 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping dull and no prospects. 

WM. Thorbeck, Agent. 
88Vo Quincy st. P. 0. Box 48. Tel. No. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping fair; prospects poor. 

Wm. Gohl, Agent. 
N. E. cor. F and Heron sts. P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. Paul, Agent. 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood No. 352. 



Eureka Agency. Oct. 9, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and prospects 
poor. 

J. W. Ericksen, Agent. 
P. 0. Box 327. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects medium. A committee was 
elected to revise the Shipping Rules. 

II. Oulsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 178. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 3, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

F. Larsen, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' 
ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 13, 1904. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 8 
p. m., John Vers in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping medium. After routine business, meeting 
adjourned. 

EUGENE Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 

Seattle Agency, Oct. 6, 1904. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

R. Powers, Agent. 



San Pedro Agency. Oct. 6, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

G. A. Floyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, 111., Oct. 10, 1901. 

Shipping dull during week, except for deckhands. 

Wm. Penje, Secretary. 



TONAWANDA (N. Y.) Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping slack; a large surplus of men on the 
docks. A number of boats laying up. 

Thomas I.estku, Agent. 
152 Main st. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Eeadquabters, Boston, Mass., Oct. LI, 1904. 

shipping medium: a large number, of ii ashore. 

WM. II. Frazieb, Secretarj 
1 '/ja Lewis b! . 



Providence (Ii. [.) AGENCY, Oct. II, 1904. 
Shipping fair. 

James Wjxsoh \ at 



New York (N. Y.) Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping medium. 

•John Coruett, Agent. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's 
Journal 



Published Weekly by 
THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Istdblished in 1887 



W. MAC ARTHUR.. .Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail, - $2.00 | Six months, - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday noon 
of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should address 
all communications of a business nature to the Business 
Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco PostofBce as second-class 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, south- 
west corner East and Mission streets, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the Journal provided they are of general interest, 
brief, legible, written on one side only of the paper, and 
accompanied by the writer's name and address. The 
Journal is not responsible for the expressions of cor- 
respondents, nor for the return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1904. 



TO IMPROVE THE PORT. 



The San Francisco Labor Council, a1 its 
meeting on the 14 th inst, concurred in the 
amendation of its Law and Legislative 
Committee on the subject of the proposed 
bond issue for the improvement of the city's 
seawall ami surrounding streets. The reso- 
lutions adopted by the Labor Council are as 
follows: 

Whereas, At the coming election next November 
there v. ill be submitted to .1 vote of the electors of 
the State of California a proposition to issue bonds 
to the a ant of $2,000,000 for the purpose of im- 
proving the waterfront of San Francisco by the 
extension of the seawall of -aid city, whereby new 
docks and wharves may be built, and also the curbing, 
paving and extension of East street may be accom- 
plished; and, 

Whereas, It is deemed important that the attention 
ot labor organizations and labor in general should be 
called to this important measure which the welfare 
of the city and state demands, whereby improved 
facilities for our 1 and port can be obtained; 

and. 

Whereas, Th< issuance of these bonds will not 
entail any additional taxes upon the people of the 
State, in: smuch as the sinking fund and interest for 
said bonds will he paid entirely from the revenue of 
this port : therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the San Francisco Labor Council 

indorses the proposed issuance Of said bonds, fully 
realizing the enormous benefit that will accure there- 
from to the city and State, and also the amount of 
labor necessarily concerned in its accomplishmi 
which the tier will receive, financially, the 

greater part; and. further, we recommend that all 
labor organizations of this State and city give due 
prominence and publicity to this importanl measure, 
mbers to vote for said proposition at 
the coming election next November. 

The City Front Federation, at* its meeting 
(,n the 12th inst, adopted similar resolutions 
mi the seawall bond issue. In addition, the 
■ body expressed its approval of the pro- 
posed Constitutional Amendment to abolish 
Slate taxation of shipping. On this subject 
the City Front Federation declared as fol- 
lows: 

Whereas, At the coming election, to be held on 

i, 1904, the electors of this state will vote 

on Senate Constitutional Amendment No. 11. which 

reads as follows: "All ships or shipping engaged in 



either foreign or domestic navigation, or in the fish- 
eries, shall lie exempt from taxation;" and. 

Whereas, California is the only State in the Union 
which has seaports of any magnitude in which ship- 
ping is taxed by the State: and. 

Whereas, Shipping has to pay a lai",. amount of 
:i tie shape of port charges, which arc Buffi 
eienl to cover the expenses of maintaining and im- 
pi "\ in"; our harbors : and, 

Whereas, As Ion- ;.- vessels have to pay taxes to 
I'm State of California they will register from some 
other State where shipping is not taxed, thus evad- 
ing ill- taxes and decreasing the number of vessels 
hailing from ports "in this State; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the City Front Federation, in regular 
meeting assembled. October 1-. 11104. that we, being 
desirous of increasing the number of vessels hailing 
from the seaports of this State, and believing this 

tax on shipping an unjust one, inasmuch as shipping 
has to pay double the taxes that other property has. 
we do most heartily indorse senate Constitutional 
Amendment No. 11. and we do earnestly request every 

voter to casl hi-- ballot in favor of this Amendment: 
and he it. further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions he for- 
warded to the press. 

These propositions are of the highest im- 
portance, not only to the shipping of San 
Francisco, bu1 t<> the State at large, since 
upon the improvement of the former port 
must depend to a greal extent the develop- 
ment of the Sftite's industries, agricultural, 
manufacturing and commercial. In no other 
instance are the interests of the interior so 
clearly identified with those of tin Slate's 
chief port as in this matter of improving the 
outlet to the sea, with the resultant economy 
and facility in the transportation of the 
State's surplus products to the markets of the 
world. California's outlook is now Our West, 
instead of Back Easl : its chief need is the 
means of transportation l>\ sea. rather than 
by land. The voters of the State should 
make it a point of personal pride — pride in 
their business foresight — to carry these two 
propositions by a practically unanimous 
vote. 



The brief account of the International 

Transport Workers' convention, published in 
another column of this issue, records one 
very significant act, namely, the steps taken 
for the "abolition of all laws which place the 
eamen at a disadvantage with the workers 
on shore." This, in brief, denotes a move- 
ment for the repeal of all maritime laws pro- 
viding for imprisonment for desertion. The 
idea was suggested to the Transport Work- 
er-.' Federation by the Sailors' Union of the 

Pacific. It is an idea that, once conceived, 
can never be destroyed. Fogies, fossils and 
Dap-doodlers may as well take notice that the 
idea of personal liberty for the seaman under 
every Hag will live until the last vestige of 
the existing "peculiar institution" ha- been 
wiped from the maritime statutes of the 
world. 



A man may he very loyal to his own union, 
\et if he fails to support other unions with 
equal loyalty — as, for instance, in the matter 
of demanding union label products — he die- 
plays Imi! one-half, and that the purely sel- 
fish half, of the true trade-unionist. 



SHIPBUILDING IX XAVV YARDS. 



Willi a proper concentration of union labor 
patronage on fair places and products, the 
"Open Shop" will shortly become a "Closed 
Shop" — that is, closed by order of the court. 



The recent launching of the United State- 
battleship Connecticut, from the Brooklyn 
( X. Y. ) Navy Yard, is an event of particular 
interest to the country, and more particularly 
to organized labor, since it marks the prac- 
tical demonstration of the claim that vessels 
of the largest class can be built at least as 
well and as economically under the direct 
supervision of the Government, as under the 

Stem of contract with private concerns. 
The claims of organized labor in this regard 
are now home out by the admission of the 
highest authorities. As illustrative of the 
sentimenl prevailing among shipbuilding ex- 
perts, we quote the views of the Scientific 
American, as follows: 

The fact that the first large battle-hip to he con- 
st ruetcd in a Government yard has been built in the 
same time as that required to construct a si-ter ship 
in what i- probably the best equipped private yard 
in the United States, is a matter that is giving the 
Navy Department no little satisfaction; for it has 
disposed effectually of the popular belief that war- 
ship construction in a Government yard was neces- 
sarily tedinu-. costly, and poorly done. • • • 

To-day, however, we have changed all that. Thanks 
largely to the energy and courage of the late 'Chief 
Naval Constructor, our Navy Yards have been en- 
tirely emancipated from political control, new dry- 
docks, building and plants have been built and in- 
-talled. until to-day our best yards, and notably that 
at Brooklyn, are in first-class condition, and capable 
ot turning out the very best work. * * * 

It i- now nearly two years since the new regula- 
tions were put in force, and it was decided to put 

them to a searching test by ordering the construction 
at the Brooklyn Navy Yard of one of the largest 
battleships ever built for any navy. At the same 
time, the contract for a sister ship was placed at the 
private yard of the Newport News Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, one of the most completely equipped plants in 
the world. 

The results have exceeded the most sanguine ex 
pectations of the Navy Department, for, in spite of 
(he disadvantages under which the Brooklyn Navy 
Yard labored, owing to the fact that it had to build 
entirely new ways and erect a large cantilever travel- 
ing crane before the keel of the vessel could be laid, 
the Connecticut has been built in about the same 
time, namely, eighteen months, a- was the Louisiana, 
while both the time .,f construction and the cost of 
the vessel have been considerably less than was esti- 
mated at the time the order for the vessel was given 
— and this in spite of the fact that the hours of labor 
arc shorter, and the pay is higher in Government 
than it is in private shipyards. 

The Scientific American has always been a strong 
advocate of the policy of building some of our new 
warships at Government yard-, ami therefore it gives 
us particular pleasure to congratulate the Naval 
Constructors on the excellent results that have been 
achieved in the case of the Connecticut. The effect 
of the new policy on the private shipbuilding firm- 
of the country has been everything that could be 
desired. There has been a notable acceleration in the 
rate of construction, the Louisiana having been 
launched in eighteen months from the date of the 
laying of the keel, no less than 7,000 tons of steel 
being worked into her hull at that period. This is a 
great improvement on any previous work, the best 
record previous to this for a battleship being about 
two years' time, and this for a vessel of smaller size 
and less importance than the Louisiana. It is to be 
hoped that the good results that have hcen attained 
will encourage Congress to allot a certain portion of 
every shipbuilding programme to Government yards. 
and that not only New York, bat League I -land. B 
ton, and other leading Government yards will he 
given their shale of the work. 

Opinion among the lay press is equally 
favorable to the results so far attained in the 
building of the Connecticut The \nv York 
Herald, -peaking on this subject, says: 

The efficiency that has characterized the control 
and construction of the battleship Connecticut found 
yesterday a new illustration in her launching. No 
hitch marred a fine performance. The vessel slid 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



down the ways with graceful ease, took the water 
quietly, and when free from all restraint floated so 
evenly on her keel as to prove how happily theory 
and practice had been wedded in the effort. Ship and 
occasion were tributes to the skill of the navy per- 
sonnel and to the ability of the American mechanics 
who contributed so much to the success of the day. 

When Congress ordered in the Appropriation bill 
of 1902 one battleship to be built in a Navy Yard 
some vexatious doubt was expressed over the wisdom 
of a provision that demanded so much as an initia- 
tive. Even the Navy Department was disturbed by 
the responsibility, mainly because it feared the extra 
cost and the probable delays that would ensue. Past 
experiences had been discouraging. Navy Yards had 
been at a disadvantage because of the conditions fixed 
by Congress in shorter working hours, more numerous 
holidays and higher average scales of wages. Still 
it was patent that other Sea Powers were succeeding 
in this field, though they must be hampered in the 
same direction if not to the same degree. France and 
Great Britain notably were building a good propor- 
tion of their fleet in home dockyards, and had we not 
seized the opportunity the failure would have been 
an unwarranted confession of weakness and an un- 
deserved blow to our traditions. 

Luckily more courageous counsels prevailed, and, 
as it has turned out, no delays have intervened, de- 
spite the bitter fight of certain sections of organized 
labor. It is now officially stated that the Connecti- 
cut is quite up to the construction rate of her sister 
ship, the Louisiana, which was launched several 
weeks ago at a mercantile yard that has had a 
lengthy and creditable experience in this unusual 
class of work. Nor is it probable that the cost will 
be appreciably greater; but even should the outlay 
be more, nnd unexpected delays enter, the effort will 
be justified by every consideration of public policy. 

The Herald's allusion to the "bitter fight 
of certain sections of organized labor" is 
somewhat oracular, and might he construed 
to place organized labor generally in a posi- 
tion of antagonism to the principle of Gov- 
ernment shipbuilding, whereas it is probably 
nothing more than an example of the tend- 
ency on the part of the daily press to asperse 
trade-unionism upon any and all occasions. 
Whatever tiffs have arisen in the course of 
work on the Connecticut have had their basis 
in the desire to safeguard, rather than to 
oppose, the principle involved — except, of 
course, so far as they have had their animus 
in the hostility of the private contractors. 
The principle of Government shipbuilding is 
an inspiration of organized labor ; it has been 
fought for and won by the constant agitation 
of the latter. It remains to be said, too, that 
the success so far attained in the practice of 
that principle is due to the intelligent ini- 
tiative and honest co-operation of the trade- 
unionists employed in the Navy Yards. The 
contention of greater cost, due to higher 
wages, shorter hours, etc., has been disproved 
in practice, as it was disproved by the argu- 
ment of organized labor, that the labor which 
is most profitable to the laborer is most eco- 
nomical to the country. The results in the 
case of the Connecticut and Louisiana are 
hut a hint of those yet to be attained by a 
continued and enlarged policy of Govern- 
ment shipbuilding in the Navy Yards. 



Those of our reform friends who decry the 
trade-union because it doesn't "come out" for 
their own particular plan (which, of course, 
is guaranteed to reform the world at a single 
lick), remind us of the carrier pigeon, which, 
after circling a few times in the upper air, 
makes a bee-line for home — except that our 
reform friends seem unable somehow to get 
beyond the circling stage. However, as eir- 
clers our friends are all right, albeit a more 
or less dismal failure as reformers. 



Mrs. Emma Lamphere, general organizer 
of the Retail Clerks' "International Associa- 
tion, who is now in San Francisco in the in- 
terest of that body, should receive the cordial 
support of trade-unionists and public. The 
immediate object of the Retail Clerks is to 
extend the early-closing mile so as to include 
all stores in the dry goods, shoes and haber- 
dashery lines, and to maintain that rule 
where it is already practiced. Friends of 
the shorter workday movement will greatly 
aid in this work by doing their shopping 
before G p. m. on weekdays and 11 p. m. on 
Saturdays and the evenings preceding holi- 
days. Of course, a necessary condition to 
the success of this work is the thorough or- 
ganization of the clerks themselves. To ac- 
complish this object it is essential that the 
purchaser should insist upon seeing the mem- 
bership card of the clerk who waits upon 
him or her. Organizer Lamphere comes to 
San Francisco with a good record for success 
in her work ; with the proper amount of co- 
operation on the part of the local labor move- 
ment that record should be surpassed, as we 
sincerely hope it will be. 



Upon the question of governmental con- 
trol in all the affairs of industry, there is 
room for argument between those who favor 
the respective principles of government, the 
paternalistic and the democratic. But there 
can be no doubt as to which of these princi- 
ples best represents the American ideal. The 
political-actionist in the American labor 
movement is quite consistent in citing the 
European workers as an exemplar, just as 
the latter, in demanding governmental in- 
tervention in their industrial and domestic 
affairs, are consistent with the principles and 
practices of European government. And, 
precisely because of this consistency between 
political action and paternalism, the oppo- 
nent of political action in the American labor 
movement is consistent with the principles 
and practices of American government, as 
represented by the maxim : "That govern- 
ment is best which governs least." 



It is noticeable that reformers of all 
schools, instead of uniting against that insti- 
tution or party which stands as the chief 
representative and support of the evils which 
they decry and bemoan, generally level all 
their forces against the strongest and most 
effective opponent of these evils. The oppo- 
sition of the "radical" and "progressive" re- 
formers to trade-unionism is an instance in 
point. The result, of course, is to defer the 
day of real reform. Come to think of it, 
perhaps that is what the average so-called 
reformer is for, although he may not know it. 



Trade-unionism has its faults, of course, 
but these are very largely the faults of num- 
bers, not of principles or methods. We are 
not numerous enough ; that's the trouble. 
How to increase our numbers, that's the ever- 
present problem. It is a problem that can 
only be solved by adherence to first princi- 
ples, i. e., religious organization for religious 
purposes, political organization for political 
purposes, economic organization for economic 
purposes. 



Tn practice even the best-intentioned Gov- 
ernment is forced to abandon much of the 
principle upon which it is elected. There is 
much wisdom in the observation that "polit- 
ical parties usually begin their existence in 
protest against great evils of some kind, and 
as frequently degenerate into organizations 
for procuring office, or for saving men the 
trouble to think for themselves." 



Every local and Federal union — also, 
every city central and State body — on the 
Pacific Coast as far east as the Rockies 
should be represented at the coming conven- 
tion of the American Federation of Labor. 
The present is the opportunity of a lifetime 
to secure a full representation of Western 
sentiment and Western needs. 



Every member of the Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific is pledged under the Constitution 
of that body to "assist other organizations 
whenever possible in the attainment of their 
just demands." As a practical means of ful- 
filling this pledge, demand the union label 
upon all purchases and at all times ! 



The hostility to trade-unionism displayed 
by the exponents of "radical" reform is an 
unintentional compliment to the former in- 
stitution, since it arises from the fact that 
the trade-union, by accomplishing practical 
results, holds the workers true to the course 
of real progress. 



Unlike the trade-tin ionist, the political 
theorist is not bound by any physical or in- 
tellectual limitations ; he need concern him- 
self only with the capacity of the human 
imagination. 



Demand the union label on all purchases ! 



The Transport WorKers. 



The fourth convention of the International 
Transport Workers' Federation was held in 
Amsterdam, August 10-13. There were pres- 
ent nineteen delegates, representing 206,250 
organized transport workers in the following 
countries: Great Britain, Germany, Austria, 
Sweden, France, Holland, Belgium and Por- 
tugal. Denmark, Norway, United States 
and Australia were not represented. The 
Federation has been in existence for seven 
years and has progressed very slowly. 
Neither the President nor the Secretary were 
present, and the delegates expressed dissatis- 
faction regarding the work of the old officers. 
It was decided to transfer the office of the 
Secretary from England to Germany. The 
convention pledged its affiliated unions to 
work for the abolition of all laws which place 
the seamen at a disadvantage with the work- 
ers on shore. Special efforts will be m 
to induce the unaffiliated maritime and trai 
port workers, particularly those in America, 
to join the Federation. The next convcnl 
will take place two years hence; the date and 
location of the convention city will be an- 
nounced by the Executive Board. Several 
proposed changes in the general constitution 
will be submitted to affiliated unions for a 
referendum. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*********** 




Extraordinary ClocKs. 



We Learn from the French newspapers 
ihat among many interesting objects acquir- 
ed by the State from the Late Princess Ma- 
ihilde's collection is a wonderful alarm clock 
which was mice the pride of the greal Napo- 
leon, and which not only tells the day of the 
month and year, the mean solar time, and 
ihe phases of the moon, hut sounds every 
quarter of an hour and is provided with a 
thermometer. 

Few things are more surprising than the 
skill of pasl generations of clockmakers, who 
not only made timepieces of the most com- 
plicated character, hut of such excellent 
workmanship that they seem almost made for 
all time. There is at ( lastletown, in the [sle 
of .Man, a clock which was telling Manxmen 
the time o' day before Oliver Cromwell was 
cradled, and which mighl bave listened to 
mi account of the Armada from the lips of 
men who had scon the Spanish galleons; and 
this very (dock, which Queen Bess herself 
presented to Castle Rushen o<»7 years ago, 
is marking time jusl as conscientiously for 
King Edward's subjects in the twentieth 
century. 

At the South Kensington Museum anyone 
who chooses may sec to-day the very clock 
which Peter Lightfoot made for Glastonbury 
Abbey aboul L325, when John Wycliffe was 
in his cradle: and another (dock which was 
ticking merrily in Dover Castle in L348, two 
years after ( 'recy was fought. In l s 7<i this 
clock was going as smoothly as it did more 
than Eve centuries before; while the Society 

of Antiquaries ha- a portable clock made at 
Prague as long ago a- L525. 

In the town of Schramberg, in the Black 
Forest, there is ;m alarm clock which warned 
sleepers it was time to act up when Charles 
II was King of England. It was made in 
[680, and is an ingenious piece of workman- 
ship. In form it resembles a lantern in 
which is a lighted candle, the wick of which 
is automatically clipped every minute by a 
pair of scissor.-. The candle is slowly 
pushed upward l>\ a spring, which also con- 
trols the mechanism of the clock; and at the 
required hour of waking an alarm is sound- 
ed, and at the same time the movable sides 
of the lantern fall and the room is floi 
with light. 

A pendulum clock, made in 1682 and once 

owned by Cromwell, is preserved to-day in 
the Philadelphia Library; and another, made 
in Germany in If. Hi, was recently doctored 
by a Connecticut clockmaker, and i- now 
running for six months at a time without 
winding. As Long ago as 1* ', 7 .*> a project was 
on foot for making a clock for St. Paul's 
Cathedral, which was to go a whole century 
without winding up. and was to cosl £4,000. 
'I'he scheme, however, proved a little loo 

ambitious, for the resultant clock cosl only 
£300, and declined to run more than eight 

days without attention. It is interesting in 
connection with St. Paul's to note that as 
'on- ago a- 1286 the Cathedral boasted a 



wheel clock, the first publicly seen in Eng- 
land. 

In 1*27 the Times had an advertisement 

id' a (dock which was warranted to go for 
a year without winding, a feat which is 
claimed for certain clocks advertised in 
England to-day. A similar timepiece to the 
one advertised in the Times is to lie seen in 
William Ill's bedroom at Hampton Court. 
A- a further illustration id' the truth that 
there seems to he nothing horologically new 
under the sun, it is hut a few year- since 
bracelet watches li-t excited the wonder and 

admiration of Englishwomen, who scarcely 
could have been aware thai more than 300 
years ago Lord Leicester placed an almost 
exactly similar bracelet watch mi Queen 
Elizabeth's wrist. 

Tn those old times, however, there is no 
record of clock- constructed from such 

strange materials as some we have read of 

within recent years. It is not lone, since a 
native of Milan made a (dock entirely of 
bread. lie was a poor man, and every day 
for three years he set apart a portion of his 

daily bread, which, by a process of which 

he would not divulge the secret, he was able 

to make as hard as metal and insoluble in 
water, and from these fragments of bread he 
constructed his clock. 

More ingenious still is a M. Le Boullat, 
of Coutances, who seems able to make clocks 
from any material, however seemingly un- 
suitable. One dock he fashioned entirely 
from old newspapers converted into pulp; 

another from Large and small sticks held to- 
gether by wires; a third from discarded to- 
bacco tins, and so on. Some of his (docks, 
however, are triumphs of artistic workman- 
ship — especially one which is made entirely 
of gold with dial id tipped hands and dial- 

(igures of rubies, garnets, pearl-, opals and 

emeralds. — London Tit-Bits. 



One Day's Accidents. 



The Spectator, an insurance Journal, lias 
compiled the following list of accidents from 
one issue of a New York daily newspaper: 

Two men killed by an automobile and the 
driver seriously hurt. Four persons hurt in 
a cah smash. Two persons injured in ;m at- 
templ to avert an auto wreck. Ten hurt in 
a In ad mi railmad collision. Young man 
drowned in the Hudson River. Four id' a 

family burned by naming nil stove. Hotel 

proprietor narrowly escapes death at the 
hands "f a drunken cook. Four persons hurt 
in an auto wreck at Newport. Six men 
drowned in Hayden Lake, Me. Landlord 

thrown from a window by irate tenant. Citi- 
zen -hot by a drunken neighbor. Woman 
di<- a- a result nf laughing while eating. 
Crazed man -hoots his daughter. Three per- 
sons killed in a quarrel. Detective in em- 
ploy of a railroad company killed by a train. 



The gatekeeper at a level crossing in 
France who was held responsible for a rail- 
road disaster was sentenced to a year's im- 
prisonment. 



Organ Grinding Pays. 

Ihe hand-organ drawn by a horse is, for 
the first time thi- summer, perambulating 
over the Orange Mountains and poking into 
remote corners of Long Island and New Eng- 
land. There are comparatively few of them, 
for such an organ is expensive, and the main- 
tenance of the horse argues a degree id' afflu- 
ence not always existent among organ-grind- 
ers, although they are a class of people usu- 
ally in easy circumstances. 

A building near the corner id' Park and 

Mulberry streets changed hands six or seven 
years ago fur $85,000. The man who bought 
it had ground a hand-organ in the streets of 
Xew York for twenty-five years. 

He was tin Italian and had lived in Lax- 
tor street all that time. The building he 
purchased is a teiieim nt house, and he goes 

mil with the organ no more, devoting him- 
self to the more congenial task of collecting 

rents. 

Mo-t of the hand organ-grinders in Xew 
York live in Baxter street, and they are 
largely Genoese, particularly the women. 
Then- are generally two persons to each or- 
gan, occasionally one or three. 

Every organ, big or little, costs $2 a day 

to rent The smallest organs, those carried 
on the haek, cost not Less than $200; the 
Larger ones, which are far more numerous, 
cosl more in proportion. Therefore, one may 

set it down that every organ he Bees i- earn- 
in- $2 a day, or the interest on an invested 
capital of $200, -inn tim, - $400 or *.">00. 
Iii addition it is supporting from one to 

three persons, a pretty g 1 job for one little 

hand-organ. As a matter of fact, iii good 
weather the earnings of a hand-organ are $5 
a day. running up to $6 or $7. Rainy days 
are nearly a dead loss: hut there tire not 
many day- when it rains all day. On rainy 
day- also, the organ man is out nothing, a- 

he does not take out the organ, and conse- 
quently does not pay for it. 

The owner keeps them in repair without 
extra charge. There are aboul a dozen men 
in New York who make a business of renting 
organs, all Italians. One man who has an 
organ shop on Elizabeth street was originally 

a workman in a piano factory. He learned 
in ihe course of his trade how to make and 
repair hand-organs He decided that the 
accumulation of capital was more to him 
than his pride, and began to turn the crank 
mi the -treet himself. As soon as he had 
saved enough he opened a shop and began 

to rent organs, lie has twenty-five or thirty 
organs now, which net him $85 or $10 a day 
through the summer months. 

There is another shop in Roosevelt street. 

two in Baxter strict, on Second street, 

one on One Hundred and Fifth street, and 
various others scattered about the city. The 
only shops outside New York in this region 

are two ill Newark. One of these helm 

a woman whose organs perambulate the 
Length and breadth of the Oranges. 

There is a man in Mulberry street who has 

ground the organ for twenty years in New- 
York. Twenty year- ago he lost an arm 

when working OH a railroad. lie took to the 
orpin and ha- raised a family in comfort, 
ami none of them [days the hand-organ. 
Xew York Sun. 



: - 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 



Australian Notes. 

(Continued from page 2.) 

Our wool crops seem to promise well and 
are coming to hand early in larger quanti- 
ties. Stock and sheep are also increasing, 
and good prices are heing paid for those 
marketed. Produce generally is plentiful. 
The great drawback seems to be the indiffer- 
ence of many of our fruit-growers and prod- 
uce-raisers in preserving and packing what 
they raise and export to other countries dur- 
ing the off seasons in England, Canada and 
the United States. Comment is made upon 
the admirable state and flavor of different 
brands of fruit sent down to Sydney and 
Melbourne by the Oceanic steamers, neatly 
stowed in cardboard receptacles. Our coal 
trade at the Newcastle fields is very dull, 
and the owners propose a reduction in the 
hewing rate. The miners are disputing the 
point and are submitting the question to the 
Arbitration Court for settlement. 

Speaking about the Arbitration Court re- 
minds me that Mr. J. P. Wright, who was 
an aspirant for the position when the Court 
was first formed, was a few days ago elected 
to replace Mr. W. D. Cruickshank, who was 
incapacitated owing to a stroke of paralysis 
a few weeks since. The Court is still con- 
gested with claims for settlement. These are 
principally from the newer unions, which 
have been created as a result of the Arbitra- 
tion law. 

The South Australian Labor party held its 
annual convention two weeks ago and adopt- 
ed as a fighting platform: (1) Progressive 
Land tax; (2) abolition of Legislative 
Council; (3) compulsory conciliation and 
arbitration; (4) public ownership and con- 
trol of railways, tramways and wharves; 
(5) cessation of borrowing; (6) closer set- 
tlement; (7) stoppage of further alienation 
of public lands. Other important items were 
approved, i. e., wages board; inspection of 
boilers; workmen's lien and workmen's com- 
pensation bills; inspection of scaffolding; 
minimum wage on all State works for com- 
petent workers; old-age pensions; food and 
drug bills, and several minor but very inter- 
esting questions. 

The Commonwealth Labor convention 
will meet on November 2, when some im- 
portant decisions will be arrived at concern- 
ing the industrial, political, and social in- 
terests of the toilers of Australasia. Great 
encouragement has been infused into the 
minds of every toiler owing to the recent suc- 
cesses of the workers' cause in the several 
State and Federal Parliaments, and the pro- 
nouncements of the ('(invention will be watch- 
ed and, no doubt, trenchantly criticized by 
our opponents far and near. 

A new labor paper called "The Radical," 
conducted by Mr. George Black, late editor 
of "The Worker," has been started in Syd- 
ney, to stir up the city and surrounding 
districts to the necessity of acquiring a Labor 
daily paper. The promoters feel very con- 
fident of success, and depend much upon the 
degree of co-operation they get from the 
unionists affiliated with the Sydney Labor 
( louncil, who number (dose to 60,000. Armed 
with such an implement, the organized 



workers of Australasia would quickly anni- 
hilate the plutocracy on this continent. 

Mr. John Cochran, an old Secretary of 
the Sydney Labor Council, has been re-elect- 
ed to the position, owing to the election of 
Mr. Thomas Thrower to the State Legisla- 
ture. Fraternally, 

Hunter Paterson. 

Sydney, N. S. W., September 19, 1904. 



We Don't Patronize. 



Opalized Dogfish. 

Since they were first discovered the fa- 
mous opal fields at White Cliffs, New South 
Wales, have yielded many curious fossils, 
particularly those of prehistoric marine life. 
But the latest discovery is a most extraor- 
dinary one, and will prove of the deepest 
interest to the scientific world. it, is that 
of a fossilized, or rather opalized, member 
oi the shark family, which was found on 
Block No. 4, at, a depth of thirty-five feet 
from the surface. 

The Sydney press states that the speci- 
men measures :; feet (i inches from the snout 
to the tip of the tail. The body is in seven 
sections, the circumference of the largest of 
which (the head and shoulder section) is 
1 8 inches ; each section is 6 inches in length. 
The deeply indented eye-sockets show very 
plainly, "and thin veins of purple opal en- 
circle the fish from tip to tip." At the mouth 
these veins make an oblong and clearly de- 
fined course, though the continuity is occa- 
sionally broken. No particulars as to weight 
are given, but as the fossil has been sent 
to London these and other matters of interest 
will soon be determined. It was purchased 
from the finders by an opal buyer named 
Murphv. — Chambers' Journal. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 
Union of America) 

121 anil 123 North Desplaines Slreet, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone 1321 Monroe 



BRANCHES 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552 

CLEVELAND. 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295 

TOLEDO, 1702 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762 
AGENCIES 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Asnland Phone 1563 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 138 Ninety-second Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago 
SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS 
CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS 



Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth. Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mil 
Sturgeon Ray, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

( isiiirs — Carl Upman, New York City; Kerbs. 
Wertheim & Schiffer, New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby, Milling Company, Min- 
neapolis. Minn.; Kelley Milling Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Buiton Company, Daven- 
port, la.; Krementz & Co., Newark. N. J. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rocester, N. Y. ; Strawbridge 
& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner Bros., New 
York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt »ind Collar Com- 
pany, Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, 
N. Y. ; Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James 
R. Kaiser, New York City. 

Shoes — Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thos. 
Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass.; Harney Bros., Lynn, 
Mass. 
Suspenders — Russell Manufacturing Company, Mid- 

dletown, Conn. 
Textile — Morrimac Manufacturing Company (print- 
ed goods), Lowell. Mass. 
Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica. N. Y. 
Woolens — Hartford Carpet Company, Thompson- 
vine, Conn.; J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Company, Chicago, 111. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Company, publishers, 
Hammond, Ind.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; 
Times, Los Angeles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS AND STONE. 

Pottery and Brick — J. B Owens Pottery Company, 
Zanesville, O.; Northwestern Terra Cotta Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111.; Terre Haute Brick and Pipe 
Company, Terre Haute, Ind.; Evans & Howard 
Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick Company, St. Louis, 
Mo.; C. W. Stine Pottery Company, White Cot- 
tage, O. ; Harbison- Walker Refractory Company, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Presscott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers. Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Davis Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, Dayton, O. ; Computing Scale Com- 
pany, Dayton, O. ; Iver Johnson Arms Company, 
Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Company, Syr- 
acuse, N. Y. ; Brown & Sharpe Tool Company, 
Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Company, 
Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass.; Hohmann & Maurer Manufacturing 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. ; Henry Disston & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.; American Hardware Company, 
New Britain, Conn. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Ni- 
agara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, O. ; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; 
Payne Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln 
Iron Works, Rutland, Vt.; F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company, Rutland. Vt.; Art Metal Con- 
struction Company, Jamestown, N. Y. ; Erie City 
Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David Maydole Hammer 
Company, Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Mesklr, Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germsr Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 

Home" Stove, Ranges, and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa. 



Terre Haute 



STREET RAILWAYS. 
-Street Railway Company. 



WOOD AND FURNITURE. 
Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 

Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 
Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, Davenport, la.; M. Goeller's Sons, Cir- 
cleville, O. 
Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Cooperage — Cincinnati Cooperage Company, Cincin- 
nati, O. ; Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin; El- 
gin Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Williams 
Cooperage Company and Palmer Manufacturing 
Company, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; Ballard & Ballard 
Milling Company, Louisville, Ky. 
China — Wick China Company, Kittanning, Pa. 
Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, 
Ga.; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. ; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, O.; N. 
Drucker & Co. (trunks), Cincinnati, O.; St. Johns 
Table Company, St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids 
Furniture Manufacturing Association, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 
Gold I,eaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. Y. ; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, 
Cape May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Tex.; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; 
Huttig Sash and Door Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, More- 
house, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort Bragg, 
Cal. 
[.eat her — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
I'll rick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus 
Buggy and Harness Company, Columbus, O. 
lluliber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, 
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, O. ; 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, O. 
Pens— L. E. Waterman & Co., New York City. 
l'aper Boxes — E. N. Row ell & Co.. Batavia, N. Y. ; 

J. N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 
l'aper — Remington-Martin Paper Company, Norfolk, 

N. Y. 
Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, Phila- 
delphla Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseor Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, O. 
Railway* — Atchison, Topeka and Santa 1< e Railroad. 
Telegraphy— Western Union Telegraph Company. 
IJ. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Ind.; 
Dla- 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



Shipping Notes. 

The Marine Firemen report general prog- 
ress all along the Coast. Conditions in New 
York are slightly better than at last writ- 
ing. A benefit was paid to Raimundo Perez, 
who was wrecked in the British steamer 
Longfellow, in the West Indies. 

Shipping generally on the Atlantic Coast, 
is slowly improving. The improvement is 
especially noticeable in the ports of Boston 
and New York, where the increase in the 
shipment of crews in the last two weeks has 
been most encouraging. Philadelphia is the 
only one of the larger ports reporting a 
marked falling off in shipping, many vessels 
being laid up. 

Some of our more or less esteemed ship- 
ping contemporaries on the Atlantic Coast 
nave lately commented editorially on the 
"sailor question." We are reluctantly con- 
strained to remark that such of these com- 
ments as we have had the — er, ahem — pleas- 
ure to read have all the earmarks of spleen. 
Their general tone is also much below what 
might be expected from organs representing 
such important industries as shipbuilding 
and shipowning. We most respectfully sug- 
gest that our splenetic neighbors wake up 
and get a move on themselves. Try to catch 
up with the times, gentlemen; and, above all, 
learn the fine art of publishing a bright, 
newsy, clean, honest, up-to-date sheet — such 
as the — well, we'll let it go at that. Finally 
we would, in all kindness, advise our behind- 
the-times friends to never under any circum- 
stances indulge in Munehausenism or bil- 
lingsgate. Both of these ancient pastimes 
are now by common consent considered ex- 
ceedingly bad form. Ta, ta ! 



Fag Ends. 



Most pessimists are "has been" optimists 
who failed to "get there." 



Brain and brawn make a team which it is 
safe to back against all creation. 



If you must have a hobby be sure it is 
one of which you need not be ashamed. 



Success and failure are such only accord- 
ing to the point of view. What is one man's 
feast may be another man's famine. 



Pass the National Eight-Hour bill! The 
time will come when men, looking backward, 
will think of us as barbarians for having 
permitted women and children of tender age 
to slave away their lives in factories, mines 
and sweatshops. And we are barbarians 
since we permit these things. 

The similes ordinarily employed to de- 
note extreme degrees of scoundrelism are 
utterly insufficient to convey an adequate 
idea of the enormity of the offense of those 
New Jersey manufacturers of life-preservers 
( ?) who loaded the blocks of cork with scrap 
iron to bring their weight up to the specifi- 
cations of the Government. The Slocum 



horror seems not to have been horrible 
enough to horrify these callous miscreants. 
It will be interesting to watch whether or 
not their "respectability" will save them 
from the punishment they so richly deserve. 
Money covereth a multitude of sins! 



The labor press of the United States is 
fulfilling its mission nobly. The increase in 
knowledge among workingmen generally in 
the last twenty years mi economic, social and 
political questions has been wonderful, in- 
deed. A country whose workingmen thus 
prove their aptitude for imbibing useful 
knowledge has no reason to fear the future, 
for upon the education of the working cl 
depends the continuation and stability of 
civilized government. Therefore, all honor 
to the labor press and its peaceful gospel 
that he who would be free must educate him- 
self! Ignorance is the greatest foe of lib- 
erty. 

If "plain living and high thinking" were 
suddenly to become the rule, nine-tenths of 
the daily newspapers would be forced out of 
business, for there would then not be enough 
"sensational developments," etc., in either 
private or public life to make their publica- 
tion worth while. It would also be a sad 
blow to those enterprising quacks whose of- 
fensive advertisements disfigure the pages of 
many newspapers preaching "plain living 
and high thinking" in their editorial sec- 
tions. All of which suggests that we had 
better not holler too much about our culture 
and civilization until we are a little further 
out of the woods of hypocrisy. 



The communication from the Rev. Mr. 
Hunter, Secretary of the Ladies' Seamen's 
Friend Society, printed in a recent issue of 
the Joikxai . came as a pleasant surprise to 

many readers on the Atlantic seaboard. We 
beg to assure the reverend gentleman that 
we sincerely appreciate the sentiments of 
goodwill so kindly and courteously express- 
ed therein; and we further assure him that 
the need of spiritual teaching in an all-too- 
secular world is fully recognized by intelli- 
gent seamen. We are glad also to note that 
Mr. Hunter is evidently a believer in deeds 
no less than words, for a Seamen's Friend 
Society "indeed" is the Seamen's Friend So- 
ciety we need. 



This country and its institutions can only 
be what the people as a whole will them to 
be; no more, and no less. The United States 
may eventually even "prove the destiny of 
man" if the people so will it. There is no 
known limit to whal concerted human will 
power and intellect may in time accomplish 
Our civilization has now progressed to a 
point where nothing but a cataclysm of Na- 
ture can undo its work and set the world 
back into darkness again. This is the most 
encouraging aspect of life, for although our 
hopes and ideals may not be realized in our 
time, it is as certain as that to-morrow's sun 
will rise that they will be realized by our 
aidants. And so each generation of men 
will pass on its longings and aspirations for 
realization by succeeding generations, until 
the destiny of man shall have been solved. 



International Seamen's Union ot America. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WUL H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 
Branches: 

BANGOR, ME., 44 Union St. 
PORTLAND. ME., 377A Fore St. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I., 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 37 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 68 West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Southeast corner Second 
.nil Lombard Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK. VA.. 52 Campbells Wharf. 
NEW BEDFORD, MASS., 7 South Water St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 
Branches: 

NEW YORK CITY. 51-52 South St. 
BOSTON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 1800 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA., corner Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE. ALA., 104 South Commerce St. 
GALVESTON, TEX.. 20 Strand St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarter*: 

BOSTON, MASS., 223 Commercial St. 
Branch : 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 21 Old Slip. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 
Itraiiebes: 

GLOUCESTER. MASS.. 141% Main St. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 129 Twenty-third St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

CHICAGO, ILL, 121-123 North Desplaincs St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O.. 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT. MICH., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR. WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, W r IS.. 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY. MICH, 919 North Water St. 
RACINE. WIS.. 923 Forest St. 
MANITOWOC. WIS.. 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA., 107 Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL. 138 Ninety-second S'. 
SANDUSKY. O., 1107 Adams St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 



BUFFALO, N. 



Headquarters : 

Y.. 55 Main St. 



Branches: 

I>i:TROIT, MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA. WASH. 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE. WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND. WASH., 88% Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH, P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. OR., 23 North Front St. 
EUREKA. CAL, P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. I., P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 
Branches: 

SEATTLE. WASH., Colman Dock, Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION 

Headquarters, Astoria, Or. 
H. M. LORNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room is open at all times to Members 

of the Sailors' Union. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 

Of Snn Francisco, Cnl. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mis- 
sion. 

American Printing House, 1067 Market. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, James H., The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Benson & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., 321 Cali- 
fornia. 

Brunt, W. N., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407 % Turk. 

California Printing Co., 41-43 Eighth. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Commercial Publishing Co., S. E. cor. 
First and Mission. 

Cook, The Morton L... Second and Minna. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton. 538 Sacramento. 

Dettmar, C. H.. 529 California. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell. 415 Market. 

Fording & Payne, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 103-109 Union 
Square. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 1019 
Market. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden "West Press, 527 Mission. 

Gould, W. H., 1019 Market. 

Hancock Bros.. 73 Third. 

Harvey, John D., 246 Sutter. 

Hayden Printing Co.. 417 Montgomery. 

Hiester, Wm. A., City Hall Square. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hinton Printing Co., 516 Commercial. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works. 10-16 Main. 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lacaze, I/., 519 California. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader. The, 532 Commercial. 

Leidecker, C. Co., 156 New Montgomery. 

Leilich & Colburn. City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co.. 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L.. 540 Clay. 

Lynch, James T.. 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press. The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Meyerfeld, Albert M.. 414 Pine. 

Meyer Printing Co., 638 Mission. 

Mission Free Press. The, 2401 Mission. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Munk, R., 809 Mission. 

Murdock. C. A. & Co.. 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co.. 532 Commercial. 

Pacific Heights Printery, 2438 Sacra- 
mento. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M.. 1010 Buchanan. 

Phillips. Smvth & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press. 723 Montgomery. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-325 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co.. 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Shanley. J. M.. 414 Clay. 

Spaulding. Geo. & Co.. 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co.. 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co.. 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co.. 656 Mission. 

Sterett, W. I. Co.. 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 213 Stevenson. 

Steutzel & Co., 109 California. 

Sunset Press. 1327 Market. 

Tomoye Press. 144 Union Square Ave. 

Town Talk Printing Co., cor. Mission 
and Second. 

Turner. H. S.. 3232 Mission. 

Upton Bros.. 17 Fremont. 

Valleau & Peterson. 410 Sansome. 

Wahl & Drake, 850 Market. 

Wale Printing Co.. 621 Clay. 

Wenderoth & Brown. 319 California. 

Werner. Geo. A.. 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co.. 529 Clay. 
Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 
Woodward. W. A. & Co.. 12 Sutter. 
Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 
Bookbinders. 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Brown & Power, 508 Clay. 
Buswell & Co.. 536 Clay. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First 
Kitchen, John Jr. Co., 510-514 Commer- 
cial 
Levison Printing Co.. 514 Sacramento. 
McGeeney, Wm. H, 33 Stevenson. 
Mclntyre, J. B.. 424 Sansome. 
Malloye. F.. 422 Sacramento. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Phillips Bros.. 505 Clay. 
Rotermundt. Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 
Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

Lithographers and Printers. 
Britton & Rey, 525 Commercial. 
Galloway Lithographing Co., 410 San- 

Roes'ch Co., Louis, 321-325 Sansome. 
Photo-Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Mont- 
gomery, near Mission. 
Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay ,,,„„.„„ 

California Engraving Co^ 506 1 Mission. 
Lewis & Newberry Co.. 645 Market. 
McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. . 

qierra Entrraving Co., 324 Grant Ave. 
iunset Engraving Co.', 108 Union Square 

Union Engraving Co.. 144 Union Square 

Yo^mite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 

American Press Association, 207 Sacra- 

Hofl-schneider Bros.. 412 Commercial. 
Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 



Twenty=five 



25 


Expert Shoe Fitters. 


25 


Union Men. 


25 


Partners 


25 


Men who share the profits of their 
industry. 


25 


Shoe Men to advance the interests of 
Union Stamp Shoes. 



Do We Deserve Your Patronage? 




Phelan Building, 812-814 Market Street, San Francisco. 
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 



»>-***-*«.«.A*««^$«$«««««««««««««««»»|^«»««««»|^««««««$««# 




$1 aweek $| 

Gold Watch or Diamond 

UINITBD STATES 

WATCH CLUB 



; 



-World's WorKers. 



640 MARKET ST., ROOM 3\l 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager. 



Union Boot & Shoe Store 



8&1 



United Workingmen 
Co-Operative Company's 
Shoes Constantly on Hand 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

C. LESTER, 12 Steuart St. 



44 EAST STREET 

Room 6— Phone Bush 341 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

ALTERING AND REPAIRING 
J. M. RICHARDS, Prop. 






The Sii Co-Operatiie Tailors 



English Worsted Suit $15.00 
English Tweed Suit . 15.00 
Scotch Tweed Suit . 13.50 



XXXX Beaver Suit . $22.50 
French Pequet G. & V. 15.00 
English Serge . . . 14.00 



PANTS TO ORDER, $400 ^S'fSSL* 

By co-operating together we are enabled to make you a suit of any ma- 
terial known on a profit of $2.50, be it XXXX Beaver or French Cassimere. 
Not a trust — but co-operation. 

Dependable Work. You Select the Clotb. 

Perfect Fit. We Do the Work. 

CAN YOU TOUCH THE ABOVE PRICES ELSEWHERE? 

- 31 Market Street 

WE ARE OUR OWN 
BOSSES. 



THE SIX CO-OPERATIVE TAILORS, 



We are far down Market Street. 
Reason: Rent, $15 per month. 



of^o 



The Monogram Cigar Store 

All kinds of Union-made Cigars, Cigar- 
ettes and Tobacco. 

150 EAST STREET, COR. HOWARD. 

GUS HOLMGREN, Proprietor. 
Agent for the Steam Laundry. 



The Castle Cigar Store 

250 East Street, near Folnoin, 

KEEPS THE 

BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS AND TO- 
BACCOS. 

Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
G. II. PALMER, Proprietor. 



Finnish peasants and laboring classes 
will vote for non-partisan candidates to 
the corning Diet, demanding public im- 
provements. 

A miner at the Mount Keira colliery, 
in New South Wales, was recently fined 
$3.70 for carrying' a pipe and matches 
into a mine. 

Australian Senator Pearce has moved 
for the insertion of a clause in the 
Trades Marks bill providing for the 
placing of trade-union labels on goods. 

Masons in the Eibenstock district of 
Germany receive from 8 to 9 cents an 
hour, carpenters from 7 to 8 cents an 
hour, and day laborers from 45 to 60 
cents a day of twelve hours. 

The Amalgamated Society of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners in the United Kingdom 
has 881 branches, with an aggregate 
membership of 71,547. The total prop- 
erty of the Society in balances and assets 
is £156,626. Last year £25,509 was spent 
on labor disputes. 

The number of paupers relieved in 
thirty-five selected urban districts of the 
United Kingdom in one day in August 
was 305,502 (viz., 155,863 indoor and 
209,639 outdoor paupers), corresponding 
to a rate of 213 per 10,000 of the esti- 
mated population of these districts in 
1904. 

The New South Wales Public Service 
Association has inaugurated a mutual 
provident fund for providing payment 
of a small sum of ready money to the 
widow or relatives of deceased civil 
servants. The subscription is Is per 
month, which will provide, under certain 
conditions, for a sum of £50 at death. 

To encourage working people to estab- 
lish homes of their own, Norway has 
founded a bank for workingmen. It 
lends money at 3V 2 and 4 per cent, and 
gives the borrower forty-two years ir 
which to pay the loan. The total cost of 
the house must not exceed $800, and the 
area of land must not be more than five 
acres. 

The Federated Employers' Association 
in New South Wales recently organized 
a meeting in Sydney, and passed reso- 
lutions condemning the Arbitration Act. 
It is said that the meeting was a packed 
affair, only one or two union officials 
being allowed admittance, and these 
were howled down on attempting to re- 
fute certain lying statements against 
the operations of the Act. 

At a meeting of the Manchester (Eng. ) 
City Council recently it was announced 
that owing to the hard times and de- 
pression in the cotton industries between 
forty and fifty thousand persons in the 
poorer parts of the city were practically 
on the verge of starvation. Similar con 
ditions prevail in London and other 
large cities of the United Kingdom, 
where the winter is expected to be one 
of the hardest in many years for th« 
poorer classes. 

The changes in hours of labor report- 
ed to the British Board of Trade during 
August, 1904, affected 173 workpeople, 
of whom 55 had their working time in- 
creased by seventy-nine hours per week, 
and 118 had their time decreased by 
ninety-eight hours per week. During the 
eight months January- August the total 
number of workpeople reported as affect- 
ed by changes in hours of labor was 
7,008, the net reduction in their working 
time being 12,129 hours per week. 

The net effect of all the changes in 
British wages reported to the Board of 
Trade in August was a decrease of £17,- 
639 per week, as compared with a de- 
crease of £129 in July, and a decrease of 
£1,296 in August, 1903. The number of 
workpeople affected was 356,596, of 
whom 925 received advances amounting 
to £35 per week, and 355.671 sustained 
decreases amounting to £17,674 per 
week. The total number affected in July 
wa« 5,288, and in August, 1903, 121,188. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



General News. 



A treat] of peace between Chile and 
Bolivia was signed on October 17. 

A revolution lias been started in Santo 
Domingo in favor of Isidoro Jiminez. 

Natives of Portuguese West Africa 
recently attacked a detachment of troops 
while it was crossing a river, killing 
254, including 1"> officers. 

Km- the lirst time in many years a 

white man ha- been nominated for Con- 
gress in the First South Carolina ]>is- 
triet bj a convenl ion of negroes. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway and its 
boilermakers have come to an agreement 
over wages. The men will have an 
increase of a cent and a half an hour. 

The jury in the ease of l-aae Cobb and 

three others charged with the lynching 
of Allen Small, a negro, at Lynchburg, 
T, nn.. several months ago, ha- returned 
a verdict of not guilty. 

Israel Zangwill, the critic and author, 
has sailed from Liverpool for New York 
for the purpose of enlisting the sympa- 
thy of wealthy New York dews in estab 
Lishing a Jewish colony in West Af- 
rica. 

The stockholders of the Consolidated 
Tobacco Company mei at Jersey City. 
V .1.. on October 17. and voted in favor 
of merging with the American Tobacco 
Company and the Continental Tobaced 
Company. 

The coal ahovelera, who have been on 
strike at Marseilles. France, for nearly 
two months, have agreed to resume work 
on the employers' conditions. This 
brings the great dock-workers' strike at 
that port to an end. 

A Ministerial crisis in Denmark has 
been averted, assurances of support hav- 
ing been given by his colleagues to Min- 
ister of Justice Alberti, who insisted 
on bringing in a law to re-establish the 
whipping-post for thugs. 

The St. Louis Exposition has made 
the seventh of the stipulated $f>00,000 
payments on the Government loan of $4,- 
000,000, which was advanced by the 
Federal authorities. The Exposition 
still owes $691,850 to the Government. 

It is officially announced that the ar- 
rangement for a parcels post between 
the United States and France, including 
Corsica and Algeria, will go into etfeet 
on November 1 under contracts with the 
Compagnie Generale Transatlantique and 
tin- American Express Company. 

The new tarilT proposals of the Nor- 
wegian Government contain no sug- 
gestiona regarding the raising of the du- 
ties on meat and machinery. According 
to the proposals there will be a duty on 
oats of 60 ore (16 cents) per 100 kilos 
(220 pounds), but this duty will shortly 
be removed. 

The first line of automobile cars run- 
ning in the public Service between Italy 
and Switzerland lias been inaugurated 

between Locarno, Sutrapallanza and 

Gravellona, and serves t,, join lie- Sim 1 

plan and Gothard road-. The ears u-ed 

are fourteen horsepower. The service is 

subsidized by the Italian and Swiss Cov- 

ernments. 

Striking a whale, four feet ol 
Danish schooner Marstan and her bow 
wen- carried away on September '_!7. 
Three days later the vessel was Bi 
by the British steamer [vernmore, Hying 

-e_.nil- of distress, and found to be in a 
sinking condition. The crew of -is were 
taken on board the [verm v and land- 
ed at Baltimore, Md. 

The New South Wales Registrar for 
Arbitration has decided to grant the ap- 
plication of the local branch of the Aus- 
tralasian Institute of Marine Engineers 
for registration a- an industrial union. 
The Amalgi ited Society of Engineers 

objected to the registration on the 
ground that the member- of the Institute 
may conveniently belong to the A. S. I-;., 
and that there is no need for two union- 

of the one trade to be registered. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters are advertised for six months 
and kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not called 
lor at the expiration of one year letters 
will be returned to the Postofnce. 



Aagard, A. M. 
A C. A.-U08 
Adams. David I. 
Adamson-1114 
Adolf, John 
Agerup, Rich. 
Ahlquist. Albert 
A lexis. Hakan 
Allan, John 
Amundsen, M. 
Amundsen, Pet 
Amundson, Alf. 
Andersen-689 
Andersen-853 
Andersen-889 
Andersen-912 
Andersen-925 
Andersen. Adolf 
Andersen. Andrew 



Anderson-58 
rson-1011 

Anderson, A. E. 
Anderson, Carl Alf 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson. Emit 
Anderson, J. E. 
Anderson, S. 
A nderson, Sven 
Andersson-139 
Andersson-1184 
Andersson, A. W. 
Andersson, C. S. 
Andersson. Eskil 
Andersson, ( ; ust 
Andersson, H.jalmar 
Antonsen, Martin 
Apps, Alf 
Arnesen, Ragnvald 



Andersen, Bernhard Arnold, Andrew 



Andersen, B. Hj. 
Andersen, Ole 
A ndersen, Sjur 
Baker, C. P. 
Baker, John 
Balcom, B. M. 
Barber, A. 
Basberg. Hans II. 
Bastion, W. 
Bauer, K. O. 
Bauer, Ludv. 
Bayne, Paul R. 
Bechler, Joseph 
Bensson-143 
Berger-1210 
Bernard. S. 
Bernert, Fred 
Blankenfeld, O. 
Blinne. Karl 
Blom, Philip 
Cainan, Geo. 
Carlsen, E.-699 
Carlsen, John L. 

son, C. V. 
Carlsson, Axel G. 
Carlsson, John 
Carlsson, W. S. 
Caroe, Arthur 
Christensen, E. 
Christensen, G. L. 



Asmussen, M. C. 
Austrand, ('has. 

Bock, Chas. 
Borini, Lew-is 
Bottcher, J. G. C. 
Boudoux. Leon 
Boyesson. Carl A. 
i tr i kemann, K. 
Brandters. J. 
Brandt, Fred 
Brandt, Otto 
Braun, F.-1195 
Bredesen, Edwin 
Brillowsky, N. 
Brose, R. 
Brown. E. 
Buthler, Krist. 
Byerling, C. A. 

Christensen, J. R. 
Christensen. O. M. 
i Christiansen, Carl 
Cleary. Thomas 
Clementsson. A. 
Clough, H. R. 
Coadon, Louis 
Connor, John J. 
Connor, Wm. 
Cooper. Hans 



Christensen, Henrik Cutmann. A. R. 



Dabel, W. G. 

Dahl, John M. 

Dahlgren, Albin 

Dahlgren, Karl 

Daniel, J. — (M.) 

Danielsson. Ernst 

DeHaan, G. A. 

Eglit. Fred 

Ek Mom -507 

Ekhart, W. 

Ekstrom, J. P. 

Ellison, Ed N. 

Els, John 

Emanuelsen, C. 

Enbom, Wm. 

Fahleson, John E. 

Fjeldstad, Olai 

Forstrom, Fr. 

Foster, Frank 

(tad. Saphus 

Gaedecke. E. 

Gasman, Geo. A. 

Gibbs, Harry 

Gilbert, Wm. S. 

i Ijasdal, Elling 

Glaubitz, Fred 

Gohring. Wm. 

Haarssen. J. 

Haberman, H. 

Hakala. Lennart 

Hakansson. G. 

Halvorsen, H. 

Halvorsen, Morten 

Halvorsen, Wm. 

Hansen-1162 

Hansen-1195 

Hansen, Andrew 

Hansen, Geo. -1410 

I [ansen, Hans 

1 [ansen, H. H. 

Hansen, H. Slgur 

Hansen. John 

Hansen, John P. 

Hansen, Maurius 

Hansen, Nokhart M.IIornborK-1 38" 

Hansen, Theo.-1218 Horn, Krist 



Dexter. Geo. S. 
Dodgson. A. H. 
Doense, J. 

i-r. Matt 
Draeger, M. 
Dyck, Max 

Engell, Emil 
Engstrom, C. 
Erickson, F. 
Knksen-512 
Erlkson, E.-38 
Evald, Ernst 
Evensen, Einar O. 

Fox, Thomas 

Fnyii. Sam 
French, J. A. 

Grandahl. Hjalmar 
Gray, J. K. 
Grey, E. J. 
Grondahl, Y. 
Gulbransen, Nils 
Gundersen-515 
Gundersen, Jakob 
Gunlach. John 
Heleneus-1360 
Hell, A.-1012 
Henriksen. A. ( l. 
Mel-hold. YV. 
Herman. Alex 
Hesselberg, K. 
Hetebrugge, W. 
Higgins, J. 
Hill-1148 
Dinner, Paul 
H.ielmer. YV. 

i [Jeresen, \\ J. 
Hobson, Thomas 
Holmes. Chris 
Holmes. Martin 
Holm. Oscar 
Doltti. John 



Hansson-1270 
Hansson, Hilmer 
Hardy, Wm. 
Hay, Wm.-I179 
Hazel, W. 
Ild. Julius 
Jacobsen-1126 
Jakobsen. N. C. 
Jankeri, Oskar 
Janssen, Weert 
Jansson-1234 
Jansson, J. Edv. 
Jansson, John 

i hi, R. A. 
Jensen-769 
Jensen-1461 
Jensen, Anders C. 
Jensen. Aug. Adolf 
Jensen, C. F. 

n, H.-869 
Jensen-919 
Jensen, H. F. 
Jensen. Rasmus 
Jchansen-666 
Johansen-1030 
Johansen-1216 
Johansen, B. J. 
en. Emil 
Johansen. F. C. 
Kaehne, R. 
Karlsen, John L. 
Karlson-sr,3 

on, Karl R. 
Karlsson. G. J. 
Kask, John 
Kepmka, R. 
Kihl, Harry 
Kjar, Niels 
Klausen, Carl J. 
Klausner. Karl 
Klemettlla, (;. 
Lang, John 
Lang, Otto 
Langvardt, N. 
Larkin, Sam 
Larsen-643 
Larsen-91G 
Larsen. Anton 
Larsen, C.-824 

ii, N. 
Larsson-933 
L;ui, Gust. 
Laverty, R. C. L. 
Legallals, Jules 
Leineweber, J. 



Hoss. John 
Houston. Rob 
Hurley. James 
Hurley, William 

rdsen-7 t 
Johansen, G, E. 
Joha nseii. Gunni r 
.1 1'lia nsen, John P. 
Johansen, T. P. 
Johansson-880 
Johansaon-1096 
Johansson-1396 
Johansson, A. 
Johansson, Aug. 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, Nils L 
Johnsen-983 
Johnson-588 

.111-1420 
Johnson. Ed. F. E. 
Johansson, J. E., 

Capt. 

Johnson, W. J. 
Johnson, Wm. 
.lordfold, Theo. 
Jorgensen. Theo. 
Joseph, E 8 
Jungjohan, J. 
Knudsen, Fred 
Knutsson. O. H. 
Knutson. Olaf A. 
Krane, Karl 
Krlstensen-928 
Kristensen. H. 
Krlstensen, O. M. 
Krisliansen. T. O. 
Kristoffersen-614 

offersen, K. II. 
Krohnert, Alb. 

Lie. Carl-1042 
Likelts, Chi 
Llllie, Fred 

a n. Artur 
l.indstrom, G. A. 
Lite, Knot 
Lockwood. Chas. 
Lofberg, F. Magnus 

Werner 
London, Frank 
Lorentzen-990 
Luden, Albln 
Ludolph, H. 
Lund, Chas. 



Leithoff, Carl 
I .epsoe, I [elbart 
Lewin, Chas. 
M icbeth-1124 

Madison, David 

u-667 
Madsen-952 
Madsen, Hans M. 
Magnusson, Karl 
Mahoney, F. E. 
.Ma honey, Prank 
Ma Imgren, Wm. 
Malmkvist, Carl 
Mannlon, James 
Martelock, Chas. 
Materre, Alex 
Mathison, J. M. 
Mathisen, T. L. 
Mathsen, Olaf 
Mattejat. W. 
Mavor-1371 
Neilsen, M. P. 
Nelson-663 
Nelson, T. H. 
Nichlasen. N. C. 
Nielsen-678 
Nielsen-859 
Nielsen, Berger 
Nielsen, Niels C. 
Nielsen, Ole 
Nielsen, Peter 
Nielsen, W. 
Oberg, Herbert 
Oberhauser. J. 
Olonzo. Julius 
Olsen-206 
Olsen-530 
Olsen-699 
i dsen-727 

n, Carl J. 
( risen, Edward 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen, Terje 
Palsen, Torwald 
Parkko, Martin 
Passon, Bruno 
Peabody, Frank 
Pedersen, Chr. 
i 'edersen, K. 
i 'edersen, Die 

sen, Th. K. 
Pederson, Louis 
Perry, Ben 
Petersen-659 
Petersen-954 
Rant a, Hjalmar 
Rasmusen, Alb. 
Rasmussen-890 
Rasmussen, Geo. P. 
Reese, Wm. 
Riches, Alf.-663 
Rockwell-621 
Salhareasen, Jorgen 
Salvesen, Sam 
Bamuelaon, \v. l 
Sandav, Frank 
Sandberg-938 
Sandberg, Theodor 
Santos, Augustin 
Saul, I.eland S. 
Schaefer. T. 
Schultz-1307 
Schwenke. Karl 
Sehey, J. O. 
Self, Arthur 

ro, Louis 
Setterberg, K. 
Shubert. Otto 
Sicki imeyer, W. 
Si iioois. Tonnles 
Silva. Joe H. 
Simonsen-1147 
Bimonsen, Tom 
Simpson, L. C. 
Sirvertsen. Hilmar 
Sjursen. Ingvald 
Smith, John A. 
Talbert, Frank 
Tbiele, A. 
Thoren, Gust 
Thorn. Arvid 
Thorssen, Fred 
Udby, Harold 
I .1.1. John-885 
Uken. H. 

\'a n der I.ohen, F. 
Van Gricken. Fred 
Van Moelen, Ph. 
Von d.r Molen, D. 
Ynssallo, P. 
Viereck, Hc-inrich 
Wagner, J. 

1 mm A. A. 
Walter, E. 
Walters. Harry 
Warren, Frank 
Warren, W. A. 
Watson, J. F. 
Weibust, John 
Weiden. Ed 
Welsh. John 
Westerholm, V. w. 
Younger, A. J. 
Zachrlsen, J. M. 
Zimmerman 



Lundgren, C. 
Lundin, Chas. 

McCarthy, Peter 
McCombs, F. S. 
McFadden, \Vm. 
McGarrlck, John 
Mel Irath, Frank 
Meinseth, Albert 
Menthen, Otto 
Merriam, B. W. 

a n. A. 
Michael. Walter 
Mikkelsen, S. 
Morre, B. F. 
Morrlsaey, Jas. 
Morris, Wm. T. 
Mortensen, Chr. 
Mullen, Leo L. 
Muller. R. 
Munson, Michael 
Nielsen. Willie 
Nilsen-571 
Nilsen-61 I 
NilSsen-787 
Nordblom, B. G. 
Nurse. Uriah 
Nylund, Chas. 
Nymalm. Felix 
X \- m a n - 7 1 1 
Nyroos-769 

Olsin, Olaf S. 
Olson-630 
Olson. Kmil M. 
Olson, Olof 
Olsson-597 
Olsson-S12 
Olsson-824 
Olsson, John O. 
Orchard, S. H. 
Osterberg, Carl 
Osterberg, Frlthjof 

■ n. Bertel 
Petersen. Viktor 
Peterson-920 
Fetterson, Kind 
Pettersson-726 
Pettersson-8 it 
Phair. Wm. 
Pick, R. O. W. 
Piedvache, E. 
Pollack, Paul 
Freuss, Fred 

Rohl, Werner 
Rolke, Geo. 
Rollo, R. 
Rosan, Oscar 
Ruellans. Jules 
Rustad. Sverre 
Ryder. .1. K. 
Smith, Valdemar 
Smith. W. 
Soderman, Elis 
Solbe, Ingwald 
Sommer. Franz 
Sorensen, N. 

n. 'I'h. mi 
Sorensen, T. M. 
Staaf-1464 
Staaf. Louis 
Stahn. Otto 
Stephan — 1455 
Sterne, Geo. 
St. James, Alfred 
Stockman. L. 
Stoschau, Johan 
Sundbiu ; J 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Sundholm. E, I 
Sundholm, Erik 
Sundholm, Frans 
Svendsen-1558 
Svcndsen. Christ 
Svendsen, Otto 
Svensson. Karl O. 
Tillman. A. F. 
Tobin. Austin F. 
Toick. Matt 
Tompson, Loui 
Tulin. Fritz 
Ulrlght. T. 
Unterein. F. 
Uribe. Felix 
Vincent, Jos. 
Vogel. A. 
Void, O. P. 
Von Kleist, H. 
Vucich. V. 

Wiebke. Ernst 
Wlhtol, Ernest 

Wi.ik. H. 

Wilhelmsen. Chas. 
Will. Clem 
Williams. R. E. 
Wilson, Robert 
Wlrnhof. P. 
Wright. C. 
Wright, W. B. 



Zimmerman. F. 
a. Geo. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Alilstrom, Alf 
Albers. Geo. 
Albertsen, Johan- 
nes 
Altonen, G. N. 
Andersen, A. -826 
Andersen. Fred H, 
Andersen, L. T. 

Andersen. V. V.-991 Francis, E. C. 
Anderson, Alfred Gonderson. M. 
Anderson, Charlie 
Anderson, J. 
Anderson, J. Edv. 
Anderson. "Wm. 



Edvardsen. J. 
Eichman, W. 
Eklund, H. 
Eriksen, Fred 
Felix. L. 
Fergusen, J. 
Fjelstad, O. 
Forstrim. C. 



Arcedlus, Ture 
Arnesen, Anders 
Baker, Ed 
Balke, E. 
Bauer, K. I. 
Beckwith. W. N. 
Berg. Thos. A. 

- hind. A. 
Bluseth, M. 
Brurim, A. 
Cameron, H. B. 
Cameron. R. 
( lampbell, John 
( 'anrenus, W. 
Carlson, L. P. 
Ceconi, F. 
Charlson, D. 
Christensen, Adolf 
Christensen, G. L. 
Christensen, K. 



Gonzales, F. 
Grainger, J. 
Greenland, H. 
Gregor, Edvin 
Gronlund, O. 
Guke, John 
Gundersen, Anton 
Haglund, Carl 
Haldorsen, A. E. 
Hanley, J. 
Hansen, Alfred 
Hansen, Edvard 
Hansen, Henry 
Hansen, H. E. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hansen, Markus H. 
Healey, T. 
Hellman, Carl 
Henriksen. Joseph 
Hermnnsen, Albert 
Hermansen, F. 
Hcrmansen, L. 
Hofman. F. 



Christoffersen, HansHoving, B. A. 



Clausen, C. J. 
Cockran, R. B. 
^ren, C. J. 
Dahlberg, Joseuh 
Daly. J. 
Didriksen. I. 
Dyk. C. J. Van 



Huhley, Howard 
Jacobsen, J. A. -779 
Jacobson, Oscar 
Jensen, G. A. 
Johansen. L.-1210 
Johansen, 0.-139 
Johansen, Wm. 



Johanson, H.-135 
Johnson, Chas. 
Jollnit, W. 
Jones, B. O. 
Jonsen, L. 
Johansen, Carl 
Johansen, E. 
Johansen, Hans 



Olsen, Sam 
Paaso, Aud 
Paulson, C. 
Pearson, J. 
Pedersen, H. P. 
Federson, Lars 
Pehrsing, H. 
Pendergast, E. 



Johannesen, J.-1119 Pendville, N 
Johnson. Hjalmar Petersen, II. A. 
Johnson, James 



Johnson, John 
Josefsen, F. W. 
Jurgess, J. A. 
Jungjahan, H. C. 
Keastner, Hans 
Kloperstrom, W. 
Knudsen. Sam 
Kongsvald, R. 
Kopplln, Robert 
Krallman, A. 
Laine. F. 
Larsen, A. -311 
Larsen, Axel 
Larsen, C. L. 
Larsen, E.-933 
Larson, Nils 
Lauren, J. O. 
Lehman, J. 
Lie, J. L. 
Lind, John 
Lind. K.-885 
l.indstrom, A. 
Lohlin. John 
Long, John 
Lorentsen, J. P. 
Madsen, C. H. 
Magnusen, Gus 
Magnusen, F. W. 
Martinsen. K. 
Mayer. Albert 
Mayerkanys, W. 
Mayne, J. R. 
Meyer, Albert 
M:etenen, A. E. 
Morrisse, D. 
Munson, M. 
Nieklasen, H. 
Nilson, C. 
Nilson. H.-680 
Nilson, H. 
Nilson, O. 
Nissen, Eskeld 
Nissen, Jens 
Nuitanen, H. 
Oberg, C. W. 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen. C. 
Olsen, Carl J. 
Olsen, E. 
Olsen, E. M. 
Olsen, L. K. 
Olsen, Marius 
Olsen, O. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 
Olsen. P. F. 
Olsen, P. O. 
Olsen, R. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL 



Petersen, P. 
Peterson, John 
Pettersen, E. 
Petterson, Otto 
Pieper, H. 
Prell, H. 
Pringle, R. 
Ramm, Wm. 
Rasmussen, M. 
Reineh, H. 
Riordan, P. 
Robertsen. M. 
Rogne, J. T. 
Rude, A. M.-1447 
Salonen, E. 
Salvesen, K. 
Sandberg, A. 
Sarin, C. 
Schoien, J. 
Schwartskopf, P. 
Selander, G. 
Severtsen, Geo. 
Slmonsen, F. 
Smith. C. A. 
Smith, Paul 
Smith. Wm. 
Soderman, J. M. 
Sorensen, Chas. 
Sorensen, H. M. 
Sorensen, P. C. 
Sorensen, P. K. 
Sovik, M. 
Stahsing, W. 
Strom, A. 
Strom, J. G. 
Sullivan, W. J. 
Svensen. Sven 
Swansen, G. H. 
Swanson, John 
9wensen-1013 
Hwensen. T. 
Thayfon, John 
Thompson. Robert 
Thomsen. Ed 
Thorsen. M. 
Thorsen, Theo. 
Wahrunberg, O. 
Walker, Geo. 
Warren, Wm. 
Wennerlund, A. 
Welzel. K. 
Wich, W. 
Wie. A. 
Wiedner, K. 
Wilson, Thos. 
White. J. 
Zelinski, P. 



Akselsen. Johan 
Akerblum, Charles 
Allen, John 
A.melsen. Johan 
Amnell, Albert 
Andersen-735 
A iid.rson-907 
Andersen-912 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, Edvard 
Andersen, Ingbret 

A. 
Andersen, Joseph 
Andersen, Salve 

Anderson. A. B.-1119 Johnson, Chas 
Anderson, A. J. Joranson, P. J. 

Anderson. Alfred Karlson, J. A. 
Anderson, A. G.-549 Karlson-3S8 
Anderson, Bertinius Karlsson, Gustaf 



Johannesen, Jacob 
Johanson, J.-1462 
Johanson, Natanial 
Johansson, Carl- 

1519 
Johansson, Carl L 
.Tohndahl, Harry 
Johnsen, Carl-588 
Johnson-1281 
Johnson, Edward 
Johnson, Edward A. 
Johnson, Michael 
Johnson. P. 
Johnston. O. W. 



G. 

Anderson. F.-671 
Anderson. John 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, S. 
Anderssen-853 
Armale. Frans 
Arvidsen, Axel M. 
Kaker, John 
Bixby. E. 
Blomquist, H. 
Bock, Charles 
Bogan. Patrick 
Bohman. Eric 
Boose, Paul-606 
..William 
Bortram, Wm. 

(package) 
Brouford. Charles 
Bryndal, Henry 
Caramatic, Charlie 
( larlson, August 
Carlson, Eric 
Carlson, J. 
Carlson. J.-3S8 
Carnaghan. W. N. 
Cheodore, Bodiou 
Chris tophersen, Carl 
Clausson. G. A. -804 
Coffman, Hilo 
Comerford. L. 
Crockstat, J. 
Diedrich, Hermann 
Fdkind. J. A. 
Kichel, Charles 
Erikson, Alfred 

Axel 
Fagerlund. G. E. 
Forsman. Arthur 
Frietrom, I. M. 
Giffln. Jim W. 
Green, F. 
Gronvall. Johan 

Frederik 
Grunbock. Johan 
Gunlach, John 
( instafson, A. F. 

Gustafson, J. -432 
(Instafson. K. Os- 
kar 
Gustafson, Oskar 
Gustavsen, Ben 
I (alversen, Wm. 
Ham. H. F. 
Hansen. Alf V. G. 
Hansen. Bernhard 
Hansen. Laurits 
Hansen. Theodor 
ling, W.J. 
n. Hilmar 
Helmke, F. A. 
I lindersen. J. 
Hinze, A. F. W. 
Ho lap pa, Oskar 
Hull, Harry 

Janhunen, W. 
Janson, C. L. 
Jansson. Carl W. 
Jean. H. G.-386 
Jensen, G. L.-1461 
Jensen. Lewis 
Jensen, Rasmus 



Ernst 

Karlsson. John 

Kenna. Peter J. Mc 

Kihl, Harry 

Kittelsen. Laurits 

Klingstrom, Gun- 
nar 

r. H.-463 

Knudsen. Daniel 

Fristensen, Gustav 

Kristoffersen, H. B. 

Kristoffersen, Karl 
A. 

Larson. Gust. 

Larson. Olaf Edvard 

Lasskey. J. 

I.f btonen. V. 

Llndqvist. Carl 

nhjelm. E. M. 

Lundberg. Erik 

Lundin, Charles 

Makelainen. J. 

Markmann, Hein- 
rich 

Matson, Victor 

Matteson, A. 

Mikkiesen. C. 

Myhrvold, Chris- 
tian 

Nelson. T. H. 

Nielsen. Fred-629 

Nlelson, N. C. 

Nissen, James 

Nilson. V. G. 

N\ strom. Emil 

Olsen, Andrew 

Olsen, John B. 

Olsen. Olaf 

Olsen. N.-502 

Olsen. Peder 

Olson. Adolf 
i Benny 

i ilson, \V. 

i I'.sterhuis. R. 

Osterling. Emil 

Pedersen. Preston 

Persing, Henry 

n, Charles 

Pettonen, K. H. 

Peterson, G. 

Peterson, Martin 

Rasmussen-446 

Rasmussen. Emil 

Rasmussen, Olaf 

Rnuer. H. 

Reid. James-326 
tad. Sorensen 
John 

Ri dale. Robert 

Rosenblad, Karl 

Royden, W. II. 

Salvisen. A. 

s.i ndtierg. Theodor 

S Hinders, Carl 

Schlllln 

Schatze, otto 

Sjonbertf-. Ha raid 

Sodergyist, otto 

Soult. Theodor 

Staaf, Louis-1464 

Steffensen. Viggo 

Stolsten. Karl 

Strelow, Albert 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE RED FRONT 

THE ONLY STORE ON THE 
WATER FRONT OF HONOLULU 
EMPLOYING WHITE LABOR 
EXCLUSIVELY. 



SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 



FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
OIL CLOTHING, TRUNKS, 
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS 

THE RED FRONT 

COR. QUEEN AND NUANU STS. 
HONOLULU, H. I. 



MYRTLE CIGAR STORE 

Importers and Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. 

The only House keeping a full line of 

Union-made Goods. 

T. J. FITZPATRICK, Proprietor. 

830 Fort Street. Honolulu, H. I. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 

Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor, 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanu Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Svenson, Sven 
Svensson, Nicolaus 
Svensson, Thure 
Syvertsen, Isak 
Thallos, Mr. 
Thompson, Stephen 
Thorve, Gustav 

Danielsen 
Tomask, Math. 



Wahlstadt, Albert 
Walbergh, Joseph 
Warren, Fred 
Werner. Ruben 
Westerholm, Aug. 
Whyne, Fred 
Wikstrom, Anton O. 
Zugehaer, Alex. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



Anderson, Frank 
Berthelsen, A. 
Borini, H. L. 
Braver, Dave 
Doose, W. 
Dickson, George 
Drummond, Steve 
Degeorges, Leon 
Dahl-517 
Eckberg, C. E. 
Filliet, Lorens 
Fristrom, S. M. 
Gunluck, John 
Gilbert, Wm. 
Horkman, T. 
Hansen, Hans Bas- 

berg 
Holmes, C. V. 
Hrelja, Frank 
Hellander, Wm. 
Jansson, Harry 
Jonesson, Fr. 
Johannesen, Ed. 



Johansen, Soren 
Johansson, K.-1396 
Jones, John 
Kohff, R. 
Lindberg, John 
McRae, Alex. 
Muller, Fr. 
Nelson, Chas.-393 
Nilsen, Henry 
Pederson, P.-896 
Richardson, Harry 
Stephan, C. 
Soderlund, E. 
Tornstrom, Chas. A. 
Revfem 
Rice, P. B. 
Roscheck, P. 
Wiebeck, Wal. 
Wahlstedt, A. R.- 

778 
Wahlstedt-788 
Westerberg, Nils 
Westerlund, C. W. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, Geo. 
Andersen, E. 
Anfindsen, O. 
Arntsen, E. 
Andersen, Lauritz 
Anderson, Ben 
Amerson, Olof 
Buch, D. 
Bernhardsen, K. 
Coffman, Milo 
Cedargren, A. 
Carlson, G. 
Christison, Harry 
Doyle, H. 
Dischler, P. 
Diedrichsen-786 
Engman, E. 
Eliasen, E. 
Farclig, B. 
Fergusen, J. 
Gasman, G. 
Horeldsen, Ch. 
Hansson, J. 
Hult, Wm. 
Hahuer, Fr. 
Hendrikson 
Halltham-1285 
Janhunen, F. 
Jones, Ch. 
Jordan, Ch. 
Jorgensen, P. 
Jorgensen, John 
Johansen. Martin 



Kent, S. 
Kuglund, C. 
Knudsen, S. A. 
Kolderup, K. 
Lillie, F. M. 
Lahde, Th. 
Lyche, N. 
Linden, M. A. 
Lindstrom, Fr. 
Magnusen, C. E. 
Martinsen, F. 
Mathisen, M. 
Meinking, W. H. 
Miettinen, A. E. 
Nyroos, O. J. 
Olsen, O. J. 
Olsen, S. 
Owens, John 
Olsen, C. A. 
Petersen-782 
Peterson, P. 
Pettersen-856 
Roberts, Ch. 
Rogind, S. 
Svenson, Sven 
Salversen, Sam 
Stevensen. J. 
Schmidt, Ch. 
Thomas, John 
Westgard, L. 
Wickstrom, A. 
Warren, Fr. 
Wilson, Rob. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Adams, Walter 
Allen, Frans 
Andersson, A. A. 
Andersson. J. 
Arcadius, Ture 
Borini, Henry L. 
Bruce, John 
Cederstrom, Wm. 
Carroll, R. 
Cross, L. D. 
Currie, James 
De Bruin, J. 
Erikson, Aleck 
Ferguson, Julius 
Fogarty, J. P. 
Fraser, James 
Frazer, John R. 
Garside, James 
Gilhooly, H. 
Glouaguen 
Gustafson. Aksel 
Hansen, Edward 
Hansen, H. 
Hilarion. Chas. 
Hinner, P. 



Ingebretsen, Nils- 

407 
Jensen, W. E. 
Johanson, Ernest 
Johanson, Frank 
Johansson, Knut 
Johnson. Maune 
Klein, T. 
Knutzer, Charles 
Labastide, Joe 
Laine, Francois 
Legallais, Jules 
Lie, Carl 
Lindberg, G. W. 
Lindstam, Olof A. 
Lundberg, K. H. 
McCarthy. John 
Nielsen, N. 
Nyberg. C. 
O'Donovan, Jack 
Ong, George 
Samuelsen, Krist 
Schilling, Carl 
Sorensen, C. 
Swanson, F. O. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store closes at 6 p. in.; Saturdays at 10 p. in. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



r 
t 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE-NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



News from Abroad. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE, TACOMA, WASH. 



c a a t n The Union Cigar Store 

WHEN IN TACOMA 

FOR 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY AND 

PIPES. 

Local and 'Frisco Papers always on 

hand. 

2223 North Thirtieth Street. 

MERRIT TERRILL, Proprietor. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor 
call at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM AND ABERDEEN 

For your Clothing, Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Shoes, Rubber 

Boots and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



UNION MADE CLOTHINC 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND CAPS 



c4£Zl 




HOQUIAM, 

WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 

Anderson, Harry Lorentzen, E. M.- 



Begowick, John 
Bjornstad, Nils 
Boock, Christian 
Borlin, J. 
Bray, J. K. 
Brussell, Ed. 
Buch, David 
Eidswaag, Peter 
Ekerlein, Frans 
Eslon, V. 
Evans, John 
Furlong, James 
Furst, Ragner 
Gilbert, Wm. S. 
Granbom, Emil 
Halvorsen, Isak 
Hanson, August 
Horsley, R. S. 
Johansen, Geo. W. 
Johanson, Karl F. 
Johnsen, Martin 
Jorgensen, Sofus 
Jorgensen, Walter 
Karlson, Oscar S. 
Kask, John 
Kristianson, C. F. 



866 

Lubke, John Von 
Mackay, Joseph 
Martinson, Holger 

E. 
Nielson, Niels 
Nilsson, Henry 
Norheim, John 
Olsen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peder 
Pott, George 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Sarnde, M. J. 
Sjonborg, Harold 
Smith, A. 
Soderman, Oscar 
Starkey, Wm. 
Stoessle, Camille 
Thampson, Harry 
Thompson, C. M.- 

251 
Vestergren, Anton 
Waldron, Harry 
Weide, Paul 
Wideberg, Oscar 
Zellmann, B. 



EUREKA, CAL. 

Asmussen, McC. Klint, Sam 

Anderson, Chas. Lehnhard, W. 

Andersson, L. T.-735Lovi, Alfred 
Anderson, J. Emil Meyerkana, Valter 



Andersen, Henry 
Anderson, Nils 
Brown, Frank 
Carlson, Pastar L. 
Carlson, Atel 
Dercks, Chr. 
Hansen, Hans Tea- 

dar 
Hansson, Gust. Hj. 
Halnberg, Alfred A 
Halvarsen, H. 
Johnson, John 



Peterson, Henry 
Peterson, Karl A. 
Patiyariski, P. 
Prauss, Fred 
Toucer, Chas. 
Sanders, Frank 
Spreeslis, Fred 
Sorensen, Thorn. 
Steffany, Joseph 
Walsh, P. R. 
Weiss, Wilhelm 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



Passon, T. 
Peabody, F. 
Rohden, A. 
Rose, W. K. 
Sinlor, A. K. 
Sigvartsen, C. O. 
Sohrimper, F. 
Thorsen, T. 
Todt, J. 
Thomas, J. 
Wouters, H. 
Vatland, G. 



Borkman, F. 
Cole, H. 
Eggers, J. 
Hansen, M. 
Haroldson, C. 
Hillborn, F. 
Hansson-1270 
Jakkopsen, J. 
Kure, P. 
Nelson, S. H. 
Olsen, C. A. 
Ouchterlong, F. 



Letters In the Office of the Fishermen's 

Union of the Pacific Coast 

and Alaska. 

Andresen, Thoralf Jacobsen, C. E. 
Annus, John Nelsen, John 

Bonde, Ths. Nelson, Peter 

Dahl, Ben Tishel, Mathias 

Eliasen, Edv. Nik. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
— Visit — 

WALTER EHRUGHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods. Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 
be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS, 




JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 

UNION MADE 

Watches & Jewelry 
STREET, ABERDEEN, WASH. 



UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 
24 Heron Street. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



You can get good 

HONEST UNION-MADE GOODS 

FROM 

A. W. BARKLEY 

56 G Street 

Becker Block, next to Bicycle Works, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 
He carries everything a sailor wears. 



Have your photographs made while in port by 

THE ABERDEEN ART CO. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 

Marine Views, Enlarging, Copying, 
& Crayon Portraits, Picture Frames. 

C. V. LOV, Prop. 
406 Market St. Aberdeen, Wash. 



FOR UNION-MADE 



Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Agency for Aberdeen Steam Laundry. 

Stand on entrance to Union Office. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



W. C. JUDSON 

... EXPRESSMAN ... 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
phone .... ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Sailors' and Loggers' Outfitters 

Clothirg, Furnishing GooJs, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins. 



THE RELIABLE 
CLOTHIER . . . 



GEO. FISHER 

Heron Street, ABERDEEN, WASH. 



King George of Saxony died at Dres- 
den on October 15, aged thirty-nine 
years. 

Filipinos are holding mass-meetings at 
Manila, P. I., to voice the popular desire 
for independence. 

Lord Milner, British High Commis- 
sioner in South Africa, hns resigned on 
account of ill health. 

Premier Combes of I'm nee will .submit 
a bill for the separation of Church and 
State in that country. 

Mont Pelee continues to throw oul 
enormous quantities of steam, ashes and 
tire, but no great damage has been done. 
It is authoritatively reported that the 
Russian fleet at Port Arthur is suffering 
severely from the fire of the .Japanese 
land batteries. 

Spain and France have signed an 
agreement by which the former gives 
her adhesion to the Anglo-French Treaty 
of April, 1904. 

Beginning January 1, 1905, the pres- 
ent rates of postage from Peru to the 
United States, Europe and Asia and 
Oceanica will be reduced one-half. 

The Prussian Ministers of Public 
Works, the Interior and Commerce, have 
just rejected a petition for the erection 
of '■sky scrapers" in Prussian cities. 

A dispatch from Fiume, Austria, re- 
ports a great increase in the number of 
emigrants going to America by the Cun- 
ard line. There are now 3,000 awaiting 
passage. 

A sudden inrush of water and mud in 
a coal mine at Gerelock, district of Koe- 
then, Germany, on October 6, imprisoned 
eighteen miners, who are believed to 
have perished. 

The Spanish Institute of Social Re- 
form lias decided to ratify the absolute 
prohibition of Sunday bull fights. This 
is considered to be the death blow to 
bull fighting in Spain. 

The Italian War Office has recalled 
under arms the reserves of 1903, except 
the cavalry and artillery. This action 
places about 50,000 more troops at the 
disposal of the Government. 

A whaler returned to Dundee, Scot- 
land, on October i), from Davis Strait, 
brings news of the safety of Captain 
Amundsen's Arctic expedition, which left 
Christiana on June 17, 1903. 

The census of British South Africa, 
including Cape Colony, the Transvaal, 
Natal, Rhodesia, Orangia, Basutoland 
and Bechuanaland, gives the white pop- 
ulation at 1,135,016, and the colored at 
:>,los.l75. 

Ernest Terah Hooley, on being held 
for trial on the charge of conspiracy 
to defraud, boasted that fifty- live Peers 
and 130 members of the British Parlia- 
ment were connected with the companies 
he formed. 

The return of the total revenue of the 
United Kingdom for the half year end 
ing September 30 shows a decrease of 
$15,233,525, compared with the corre 
sponding period of 1903. The principal 

decrease is in the property and inc 

tax, $12,100,000. 

Kuropatkin's advance movement re 
suited in a battle, beginning October 9 

and continuing to the present date, in 

the vicinity of the Shakhe River, in 
which the Russians have been defeated 

with great looses. II i-, estimated that 
the total losses in killed and wounded 
on both sides will number (!<U)00 or 70,- 

000, of which the Russian^ h>st. aboul 
40,000. 

At a conference between the Russian 
Ministers of the Interior, Finance nil 
Communications, there was arranged on 
behalf of -lews wishing to emigrate to 

South America or any foreign COUntrj 
outside of Europe a new railway tariff 
to the Russian frontier. Reduced rales 
will be obtained on single tickets, ... on 
those for parties on tin' production bj 
J travelers of passports. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The United States Steel Corporation 
lias made B radical reduction in wages 
which is expected to affect all its plants. 

The Shenango (Pa.) tin mill resumed 
work on October 10. Two thousand tin 
workers arc employed. The Greer tin 
plate miil is expected to resume shortly. 

The miners of District 14, of Tennessee 
have decided to accept the 7 per cent 
reduction in wages offered by the opera- 
tors. There are about 0,000 union men 
in the district. 

The union label agitation recently in- 
augurated by the San Francisco Labor 
Council is being pushed with great vigor, 
with every promise of substantial results 
in the near future. 

There will be no general potter; strike 
at Trenton, N. J. The men and theii 
employers have agreed on a scale for 
five years. The adoption of a uniform 
Scale lias been the contention for several 
years. 

It is reported that the cutters and 
other members of the United Garment 
Workers of America, who eight weeks 
ago went on strike because of an an- 
nounced "Open Shop'' policy on the part 
of clothing makers, have returned to 
work. 

The Chicago Shipbuilding Company, 
the local branch of the United States 
Shipbuilding Company, reopened its 
shops on October 15. The shops shut 
down last May. The Company has re- 
ceived contracts to keep the men busy 
until spring. 

The switch crews and engineers and 
firemen at Reno and at Sparks, Nev... 
went on a strike on October 17. They 
want shorter hours, but the Southern 
Pacific officials have refused to grant 
them. The result is a complete tie-up 
of all freight trains. 

'the MacBeth-Evans Glass Company, 
of Charleroi, which has been running its 
Charleroi plant non-union for several 
weeks, has secured a preliminary injunc- 
tion against a number of its former em- 
ployes, restraining them from interfer- 
ence with the new men. 

Bight of the nine union teamsters whe 
were convicted in the Superior Court at 
New Haven, Conn., last spring on the. 
charge of conspiracy in bringing about 
a teamsters' strike, were recently sen- 
tenced to three months each in the 
County Jail. Orrin J. Stoddard, the 
ninth man, has defaulted. 

By the toss of a coin at a conference 
in Orange, N. J., between the boss slat- 
ers and the journeymen of Slaters' Local 
Union No. 3, an agreement was reached 
whereby the strike which has been on 
since July 1 was settled in favor of the 
strikers and the men were directed to 
return to work. 

The Structural Building Trades Al- 
liance, of Chicago, 111., has decided to 
submit a plan of arbitration to the na- 
tional organization of building contract- 
ors. Representatives of the latter say 
the plan may prove a good one, providing 
that each of the sixteen basic building 
trades becomes party to the agreement. 

The steel workers employed in the rail 
and sheet departments of the Illinois 
Steel Con:]). my's plant at South Cliicago, 
111., have been notified that when the 
present agreement expires, January 1 
1905, it will not be renewed. This means 
that the same reduction in wages and 
lengthening of hours will prevail ir 
South Chicago a- in Joliet. 

The membership of the International 
Typographical Union is now voting on 
the -i\ propositions submitted to a ref- 
erendum by the recent convention of that 
body. I'h'- most important of these ques- 
tions is that of establishing the eight- 
hour day in book and job offices on Jan- 
uary 1, 1900, and the levying of an as- 
sessment of y 2 of 1 per cent on all earn- 
ings for the purpose of making the de- 
mand effective. 



FOR SALE 
VOLUME XVII 

OF THE 

Coast Seamen's Journal 

BOUND AND INDEXED 



nninr to unions affiliated with the International Sea- #n nn 
nlUC men's Union of America, or members thereof, VtiUU 



• • • Apply to . . . 
BUSINESS MANAGER, COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. AVENGORD, Proprietor. 



First-Class Board and Lodging 

Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAL,. 



The Humboldt Lodging House 

F. IIDlti.1 >. Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE IN 
EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 

BY THE 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

403 FIRST STREET, EUREKA. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City or County on short notice. 

HALTINNER & JOHNSON, Proprietors 



CITY SODA WORKS 

PETER DELANEY, Proprietor. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

S18 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 
Has Removed to 439 Second St. 

CORNER OF F, 
White Labor Only. EUREKA, CAL. 



THE MODEL 

Union-made Clothing nnd a full line 
of Men's Wear. 

The Model $3.50 Shoes 

Orders taken for Union Tailor- 
made Suits. 

AUG. GUSTAFS0N, 437 Second St. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging. $5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 25c and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



WHEN IN PORT CALL AT 

South Bay Hotel 

FIELDS LANDING. 



J. B. BIRD, Proprietor. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Good Board and Lodgings by day, week 
or month. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ISSUED BY 



".UThQRITY OP 




From 
Maker to Wearer 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Paeiflc Coast selling goods at less 

than Eastern prices. 

THE BLUE RROINT 



S12 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. 



Manufacturers nnd Retailers 
CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Phone Red 1786 

IRA A. CAMPBELL 

PROCTOR IN ADMIRALTY. 

Rooms 210-217 Bailey Building. 

Seattle, Wash. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR EXAMINATION 
NEVER HAD A FAILURE. TERMS MODERATE 

Navigation 

—AND— 

Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. JAS. MARSHALL 

i 614 First Ave. , Seattle Compaaieg Adjmt«i 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Navigation and Nautkal Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Miss Helen C. Smith, - - Instructor 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
sail, American and British. 
2225 Vi First Ave. Phone Black 5424. 

Gapt. Sorensen's Navigation School 

Established 1899. 
105 PASSED-NO FAILURES 

Room 59, . . Safe Deposit Building 

Flrat Avenue, foot of Cherry Street, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



HTHEN IN PORT 

Trade with the Old Reliable 

SAWTELLE STORE 

• — Dealer in — 

PURE GUM BOOTS. CANVAS 

BOOTS, LLAMAS AND OILShl\>. 

In fact everything; appertaining to 

Seamen's Outfits. 



Jnat around 
the corner 

from 
Union Offloe , 



SAWTELLE BUILDING 

EUREKA 



O'CONHGR'S CIGARS 

The popular favorites. Equal in flav- 
or and aroma to cigars of twice their 
cost. They are made by union men, 
therefore always reliable and in good 
condition. Best value ever known. 

C. O'CONNOR 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

!>.12 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



EXPRESS N^ 101 

Stand near Sailors' Union OiT.ce. 

F. F. JOHNSON. 

Phone Hood 3S0. PORTLAND, OR. 



Headquarters for Seamen. 



NEW YORK LODGING HOUSE 

Alueut Halleb, Prop. 

Newly Furnished Rooms. Entirely Remodeled 

Prices Moderate. Phone Hood BBS, 

203 BliKNSIDE STHKl'T. 

Cor. Front, near First PORTLAND, OR 



INFORMATION WANTED 



John Mullen, who was employed as 
fireman on the steamer Ventura some 
two and one-half years ago, is requested 
to communicate with his wife at 69 
Clyde St., Anderston, Glasgow. 

C. Roach, who left the British ship 
Lynton at San Francisco in February, 
1900, is requested to communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Mary Roach, 4 Queen 
St., Queenstown, Ireland. 

John McGovcrn (alias John Wilson), 
last heard of in New York March, 1902, 
when on board the S. S. Calburga, is 
inquired for by his mother at Belfast, 
Ireland. Anyone knowing his present 
whereabouts will please notify the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 

Information regarding the wherea- 
bouts of Fricdrich Wilhelm Budde, born 
at Coeln-Deutz, April 1, 1808, who left 
Germany twenty years ago as a cabin 
boy, and last wrote to his relatives from 
Santa Barbara, Cal., in 1891, is respect- 
fully requested. German Consulate, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. H ABE RE R, PROP. 

161 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE 

Carries a full line of Clears, Tobaecos 

and Smokers' Artieles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone Ind. IIS. 




CLOTHING HOUSE 



Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Boots, Shies 

Hendquarterx for Seamen's Outfits. 

All Union Itlade Goods 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 
SEATTLE* MASH. 



BONNEY & STEWART 
UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia 51 »., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUENAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Pine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James C. Bartlett, aged 34, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

K. A. Johnsson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Rendal, in 1902, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

John Welsh, a native of Central Amer- 
ica, member of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Martin Andersen, a native of Tors- 
lando, Oland. Sweden, is inquired for by 
his brother, G. Andersen, at present in 
the Marine Hospital at San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Herman Heino, native of Finland, aged 
25, who left Australia one year ago in 
the schooner Golden Shore, bound for 
Puget Sound, is inquired for. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Emil Enberg, a native of Finland, 
aged about 30 years; last heard of in 
San Francisco a year ago, is inquired 
for by Captain S. A. Enlund, ship Glen- 
ard. Address, W. R. Grace & Co., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

0. Peter Valdemar Petersen, born in 
1867 in Kallunborg, Denmark, last heard 
of in 1890, when sealing from San Fran- 
cisco, and was living in Rio Vista dur- 
ing the winter from 1890 to 1894, is 
inquired for by his brother, P. C. Peter- 
sea, box 41, San Pedro, Cal. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 




SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



UNION MADE BY UNION MAIDS 



A 




V 



California Undertaking Co. 

Private Residence Parlors 

R. 4 DEVLIN. MANAaCA 
W. L. LlNOSCY, «K«tIA«t 

CORNER POST 406 POWELL ST 

■ AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
CMBALMINO A SPECIALTY 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall. 

We Sell the Kind of Goods You Require. 



EXTRA STRONG HICKORY SHIRTS \ 
BEST OVERALLS 1 . 

GOOD LUMBER SHOES 
STOCKTON FLANNEL UNDERWEAR 






ALSO A FULL, LINE OF GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS. 
Look at our Goods. You will be pleased. No trouble to show them. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

Of California. 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL S3.000 OOO OO 

PAID DP CAPITAL AND RKSKRVE 81, 725,000. 00 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator Guardian or Trustee. 

Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposit and savings. Investments care- 
fully selected. 

OFFICERS: 

Frank J. Symmes, Horac« H.Hill, H. Brunner. 

'President. 



Vice-President. 



Cashier. 




A. ANDERSON, 



The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Corner Drumm and Commercial Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone James 4846 

A new building erected especially for 
sailors. Latest improvements, clean and 
light rooms, bath, reading and dining 
rooms. First class board and lodging at 
reasonable rates. Gospel service — Sun- 
days, 3:45 p. m., and Wednesdays, 8 
o'clock p. m. All welcome. 

missionary and Manager 



UNION STORE 

HOR UNION SAILORS 
AND FISHERMEN 

By making cash sales only we are 
enabled to sell at the lowest figure. 



STABENS & FRIEDMAN 

CLOTHIERS and OUTFITTERS 

257-259 Paoifio St. 

Between Battery and Front. San Francisco 



JOE HARRIS 

Sea-faring . Men's . Outfitter 

Ready Made Uniforms. 
Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., near EAST 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



H. WARRINGTON 

SAILORS' FURNISHING GOODS 

Union-made Shoes, Hats, Caps, Under- 
wear, Tobacco, etc. 



You'll find everything- strictly first class. 

711 Davis Street, near Broadway. 

(Opposite Fler 0.) 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL. WITH THE UNION LABEL. 

We give you a square deal. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH - SIDE - HOTEL 

806 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and Kins Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and lodging, $6 per week. All 
rooms single. 



EXPRESSING 

— Done by — 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Cor. East and Mission Sts, 



Sailors Outfitting Store 

J. GOODMAN 

110 Berry St., San Francisco 

The Best Goods in the Market. 



M. A. MAHER 

Men's - Furnishing - Goods 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Worklngmen's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 



206 EAST STREET, NEAR HOWARD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



FRANK JOHNSON 
SAN PEDRO HOTEL 

6 HOWARD STREET, S. F. 



Newly furnished. Large and airy 
rooms by the day, week or month, at 
reasonable rates. 

FIVE MEAL TICKETS, $1. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Alfred St. James, a seaman sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

John Williams, alias John W. Assars- 
son, a native of Sundsvall, Sweden, last 
heard of in San Francisco, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

G. L. Jensen, who sailed from San 
Francisco about January 12 last on the 
schooner Emma Utter and discharged on 
arrival at Gray's Harbor, is requested 
to call at the United States Shipping 
Commissioner's office at San Francisco-. 

Oscar Sander, aged 15, dark hair, 
brown eyes; left the Orphans' Home at 
Los Angeles several years ago ir ship as 
cabin boy in a vessel at San Pedro, Cal., 
is inquired for. Anyone knowing his 
present whereabouts will please notify 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The Navy Department has warned all 
Navy Yard Commandants to exercise 
more vigilance in policing the Yards. 

The three-masted schooner James R. 
Talbot, loaded with 3,000 casks of lime 
for New York, was burned near Rockland 
(Me.) Breakwater on October 7. 

The new four-masted schooner Au- 
gustus H. Babcock, recently launched at 
Bath, Me., sailed for Philadelphia, Pa., 
October 7, on her maiden voyage. 

The United States gunboat Paducah 
was launched at the shipyards of the 
Gas Engine and Power Company on the 
Harlem River, N. Y., on October 11. 

Besides twenty-two wireless telegraph 
stations already established, the Bureau 
of Equipment of the Navy Department 
has planned sixty more on the North 
American continent, insular possessions 
and Panama. 

A contract has been awarded for a 
wireless telegraph station nea*/ Fort 
Morien, C. B. The old towers at Table 
Head are to be dismantled. The station 
is to be the most powerful yet erected 
in Cape Breton. 

While going out from Great South 
Bay recently, bound for New York, the 
51-ton schooner Glide, of New York, 
grounded on Fire Island Bar and sank. 
Her crew were rescued by the life-savers 
from the Oak Island Life- Saving Sta 
tion. 

A derelict three-masted schooner, 
wrapped in flames, and with two boats 
still on her deck, was sighted recently 
by the steamer Kaiser Wilhelm der 
Grosse, on the passage to New York. 
The schooner could not be identified. 
She turned completely over. 

The master of the British steamer 
Albuera, from New Caledonia for Dela- 
ware Breakwater, before reported beach- 
ed in the Straits of Magellan, wires the 
owners at St. John, N. B., that the 
salvage will be over $50,000. The vessel 
is loaded with a cargo of chrome ore. 

Shipping agents and brokers in New 
York express alarm at the rapid diminu- 
tion of export tonnage in wheat and 
other grain from American ports. The 
latest report of the port authorities of 
Galveston, Tex., shows that during the 
last month the amount of wheat cleared 
was less than 7,000 bushels, and was 
carried in one vessel, bound for Havre. 
The port report for the same month last 
year showed 32,000 bushels cleared. 
From other grain-shipping ports on the 
Gulf and Atlantic come statistics that 
are almost as discouraging, if not equal- 
ly so. 

Fears are felt for the safety of the 
bark Willard Mudgett, from Newport 
News, Va., for Bangor, Me., with coal. 
She was last reported spoken off Ten- 
wick's Island September 13, and it is 
believed she foundered in the hurricane 
of the 14th. Captain Fred Blanchard 
was in command and was accompanied 
by his father, Captain William Blanch- 
ard, principal owner of the vessel, and 
formerly commander of the ship Gover- 
nor Robie and other square-riggers. The 
vessel carried a crew of ten men. She 
was built at Stockton, Me., in 1874, and 
registered 839 tons. 

President Roosevelt has made public 
the findings of the commission appoint- 
ed by him to investigate the burning of 
the steamer General Slocum. In addi- 
tion to indorsing the recommendations 
of the commission for improvements in 
the Inspection Service, the President or- 
ders the dismissal of Robert S. Rodie. 
Supervising Inspector of the Second Dis- 
trict, Steamboat Inspection Service, and 
James A. Duinont and Thomas H. Bar- 
rett, Local Inspectors in charge of the 
port of New York, the commission hold- 
ing them directly responsible for the 
laxity of the steamboat inspection, to 
which the Slocum disaster was directly 
attributable. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the 'Wits. 



Nothing More. — Hicks— "So you went 
home with Stingiman for lunch to-day 
eh? What did you gel v" 

Wicks — -An appetite for dinner." 



Worth Something. — "You haven't for- 
gotten that $5 you owe me, have you?" 
"Oh, no! 1 still have it in mind." 
"Well, fin- goodness' sake. don"t lose 
your mind." 



Money Did It. — 

"I'is not that she's contrary. 
Hut now she's rich, ami she 

Who once was Ellen Mary 

Now is Elenore Marie. 



A Place I'm Hunting. — "Is this a good 
place t<> limit reedies?" asked the a ma 
teur gunner. 

"Sure," replied the boy: "You could 

hunt here fur a week an' never find 
none." 



Looked Like Him. — Sharpe — "Say! 

thai was rather a disreputable man you 

just spoke to." 
Cadley— "Sir! thai was my brother!" 
Sharpi — "Beg pardon, I mighl have 

known that." 



A Bad Break.— Nell— "Mad at him? 
Why. he wrote a lovely poem t>> her." 

Hello — "Yes, hut she never read it. 
When she saw the title of it she tore the 

whole thing up in a lit of anger. You 
see, he called it 'Lines on Ethel's Face.' " 



Play Too short. Perhaps.— Mr. Chats- 
worth — "Did you enjoy the matinee. 
dear?" 

Mrs. Chatsworth — "Oh, very much. 1 

sat next to Mrs. Caddie, whom 1 haven't 
seen for years, and we did have a nice 
lone chat." 



Xell 



"She doesn't 
Who said she 



Quite Different. 

look very athletic." 

I'.elh — "Of course not. 
did?" 

Nell— "Bui you said she was always 
engaged in some college -port." 

Belle— "Nonsense! I said 'engaged 

to.' " 



Disgraceful. — "( Iracious !" exclaimed 
the <s 1 woman, "we'll have to stop 

Tommy playing that horrible baseball." 
"Wh\ ?" asked her husband. 
"Here's a piece in the paper about 
some Cincinnati player- who were trans- 
ferred to Pittsburg, and now, it -ays. 
they're regular Pirate-." 



LUNDSTROM'S 



DNION 
MADE 



$2.50 HATS 



PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

I lr.s Market Street, opposite Central 
Theater, and 605 Kearny Street. 



Country Orders solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
CM 



P -~l»w< tfAulhontj ol the—- 1 

TIMUI WWttS^SH^JjV I HTIMATI0 NU. 



Established 

Over 

30 Years 

on the 

Pacific 

Coast 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




Union made 

tlotKmo 



fSSDB)Bi^lTrHORrrY«F 




RH3STERED 



m 



We were one of the first firms in the 
United States to put the union label on our 
garments. As we manufacture our own 
stock, all our clothes bear the union label. 

Other stores in San Francisco have a few union-made lines 
to show union men. 

Every thing is union made in our establishment. 
In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a 
saving of middlemen's profits. 
Ready-made suits and overcoats from $10.00 to $35.00 
Made-to-measure clothes from $10.00 to $45. 00. 



TC 



S. IN. WOOD <Sr CO. 

740 iVlarket St., San Francisco. 




James A* Sorensen Co* 

Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 



103 to 1 1 1 SIXTH STREET, 

TELEPHONE JESSIE 2821 



Below Mission 
san francisco 



James jf. Sorensen, 
fras. ci* TTreas. 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for two years. Eyes Tested 
Free by an expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

The Big Jewelry Store 



Lnion Men and Women 

The Following San Francisco Shoe Stores 
are Displaying the Union Store Card : 



G. FISHER, 

PHILADELPHIA SHOE CO., 
R1GHTWAY SHOE CO., 
ROYAL SHOE CO., . 
J. T. SULLIVAN CO., 
WALKOVER SHOE STORE, 
H. WOLF & BRO., . 



945 Market St. 

10 Third St. 

812-814 Market St. 

50 Third St. 

20 Fourth St. 

924 Markt-t St. 

208 Sixth St. 



H»4 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between lKng and Berry Sts., San Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, 
Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly UNION 
MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market prices give me a call. 
Do not make a mistake — LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




Cflfi BATTERY STREET 

WUW COR. WASHINGTON STREET 

u PP s M Cu.ton, h.u.. SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest and best 
equipped private Nautical School in the United States, 
Graduates prepared for the American and British 
Merchant Marine examinations. Warrant officers of 
the United States Navy prepared for examination for 
commissioned officers. Special course for cadets en- 
terlng the United States Naval Academy and Ameri- 
can Merchant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for both young 
and old navigators, is now in the Library of every 
Pacific Mail steamship, in many Universities, and is 
highly recommended by many noted navigators. 
Send for circulars and testimonial*. 



At H ale 9 s 

THE UNDERWEAR SEASON 
OPENS AT HALE'S 

Thousands of garments for 
men, all good, all under- 
priced. 

MEN'S GARMENTS 
START AT 39c 

Beavy gray merino undershirt* 
and drawers, splendidly made, 
nicely trimmed. But it's in the 
warmth and finish and comfort of 
the garments lies t In- uausualness 

i if the \:i hie Every scam i- cov- 
ered: all -i/c-. I'.nt you will know- 
how unusual graj merino under- 
wear i- at 39c a garment, and you 

won't lie slow to share them. 

San Francisco's 

8-Hour Good Goods Store 

Market St., Near Sixth 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Sailors' and Firemen's Clothing 

ami General Supplies. 



COLBY & FITZPATRICK 

I TV" Steunrt Street, 

Bet Market & Mission, - .-an Francisco 



...SMOKE... 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION_MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY STREET. 



"LA CORTINA' 

CLEAR UNION MADE HAVANA 

MASCOT! Best 5 cent 
BLUE CAP j Cigars 

FACTORY, 111 TURK STREET 



STILL ON DECK 



ED. ANDERSEN 



7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY 

LUMBER HOOKS 



Scotty's Milwaukee 
Sweaters and Jackets 

Have stood the test against all competitors 

I. like l.iriiis Men All Kunn It. 

SWEATERS SENT BV 
HAIL FOR $3.30 

Beware of imitations 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTY" 

III MEN0MENEE ST., MILWAUKEE. WIS. 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XVIII. No. 5. 



SAX FKANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1904. 



Whole No. 889. 



FOR JAPANESE EXCLUSION. 



San Francisco Labor Voices Public Demand. 



Rapid Increase of Jap Immigration. 



FOR some years past, indeed ever since Japanese 
immigration to the United States became a 
noticeable factor in industrial affairs, public 
sentiment in the West has favored the application to 
that class of labor of the laws providing for the 
exclusion of Chinese labor. The reasoning by which 
the policy of Exclusion has been justified is the same 
in the case of the Japanese as in that of the Chi- 
nese; if possible, that reasoning applies with greater 
force in the former than in the latter case, since 
those differences of racial characteristics which are 
sometimes cited in favor of the Japanese are merelj 
external and superficial, constituting in reality a 
greater menace, as compared with the undisguised 
characteristics of the Chinese. 

The fact that public sentiment against the immi- 
gration of Japanese labor has not in the past assum- 
ed the form of a demand for immediate legislative 
action is due solely to one cause, namely, the need 
of concentrated effort to secure complete and perma- 
nent Chinese Exclusion. Now that the latter pur- 
pose has been accomplished in at least a reasonable 
degree of effectiveness, the way is clear for action 
which shall perfect the measures of Exclusion neces- 
sary to protect American labor from a prospective, 
and in fact actual, invasion of Japanese. It so 
happens that with the disposal of the Chinese phase 
of the coolie-labor question, the complementary aspect 
of that question has assumed more pressing form. A 
suggestion of the state of affairs in this connection 
is contained in the current Report of the State Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics, a synopsis of which has just 
been published. Labor Commissioner Stafford's views 
concerning the number and habits of the Japanese 
now in California, as quoted by the San Francisco 
press, are as follows: 

The total population in the United States of Jap- 
anese in 1880 of only 80, increased to 10,151 in 1900; 
since then 10,524 Japanese have landed in the port 
of San Francisco alone, coming direct from Japan, 
while in only the last twenty months 7,942 have 
arrived from Honolulu and Victoria. The Report 
asserts that at least 25,000 Japanese have reached 
San Francisco since 1900. 

The Chinese, on the contrary, are becoming fewer 
every year. The Chinese population of 75,132 in 
1880 in this State has shrunk to 45,753, or a decrease 
of 39 per cent. The mining districts of twenty-three 
counties have witnessed a decrease of 80 per cent of 
their Chinese population in the last few years. 

The statistics show that the Japanese are taking 
the places of the Chinese in many capacities, to say 
nothing of the whites whose positions as domestics 
are being usurped by the little brown men. Another 
interesting feature of the "Yellow Peril" problem is 
brought out in the statistics, which show that the 
Japanese, as a class, are not steady in their demand 
for employment. Compared with the Chinese, the 



figures show that 24.2 per cent of the Japanese re- 
main unemployed during part of the year, as against 
10.7 per cent of the Chinese, who, as most house- 
wives will admit, hold on to their jobs as servants 
longer than the Japanese. Forty per cent of all the 
Japanese arriving at San Francisco engage them- 
selves as domestics and personal servants; the larger 
poll ion of the balance are employed in agricultural 
work. The inference, in short, of the Report is 
strongly suggestive of danger from the increasing 
number of Japanese, who are taking the places of 
whites in various lines of work. 

The 35,000 Japanese here accounted for do not, 
even ostensibly, embrace the numbers of that race 
at present in the United States. The figures quoted 
cover the State only and are valuable chiefly as a 
basis upon which to calculate the rate of increase in 
Japanese immigration. By way of initiating formal 
action toward securing Japanese Exclusion, a resolu- 
tion, introduced by the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
was adopted by the San Francisco Labor Council at 
its meeting on the 21st inst., as follows: 

Whereas, The menace of Chinese labor, now greatly 
allayed by the passage and enforcement of the Chi- 
nese Exclusion Act, has been succeeded by an evil 
similar in general character, but much more threat- 
ening in its possibilities, to wit, the immigration to 
the United States and its insular territory of large 
and increasing numbers of Japanese and Korean 
laborers; and, 

Whereas, The American public sentiment against 
the immigration of Chinese labor, as expressed and 
crystallized in the enactment of the Chinese Exclu 
sion Act, finds still stronger justification in demand 
ing prompt and adequate measures of protection 
against the immigration of Japanese and Korean 
labor, on the grounds, first, that the wage and living 
standards of such labor are dangerous to, and must, 
if granted recognition in the United States, prove 
destructive of, the American standards in these essen- 
tial respects; secondly, that the racial incompati- 
bility, as between the peoples of the Orient and the 
United States, presents a problem of race preserva- 
tion which it is our imperative duty to solve in our 
own favor, and which can only be thus solved by a 
policy of Exclusion; and, 

Whereas, The systematic colonization by these Ori- 
ental races of our insular territory in the Pacific, and 
the threatened, and partly accomplished, extension 
of that system to the Pacific Const and oilier West- 
ern localities of the United States, constitutes ■■< 
standing danger, not only to tic domestic peace, but 
lo the continuance of friendly relations between the 
nations concerned; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the terms of the Chinese Exclusion 
Act should be enlarged and extended so as to per- 

i lently exclude from the United States ami ils 

insular territory all classes of Japanese ami Koreans, 
other Hmn those exempted by the present terms of 
that Act; further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be submitted, 
through the proper avenues, to the Congress of the 

United States, with a request for favorable COnsidl in 
tion and action by that body. 



The delegate of the Labor Council to the forth- 
coming convention of tin; American Federation of 
Labor was instructed to introduce this resolution at 
the sessions of that body. The Federal ion is already 
on record as favoring Japanese Exclusion, so that its 
adoption of the resolution may be taken for granted. 
The matter will then be passed up to Congress. 

That the views expressed by organized labor in 
San Francisco are not merely local, that these views 
are not confined either to one locality or to one class, 
may be gathered by even a cursory perusal of the 
public prints. As an example in point, we quote the 
Seattle (Wash.) Union Record, as follows: 

It's more than even money that the approaching 
convention of the American Federation of Labor will 
have something to say about the "Yellow Peril," and 
the utterance will not deal with the Rus;3-Jap war, 
cither. The "Yellow Peril" that confronts the Ameri- 
can workingman will be more imminent when the 
present Eastern war is over than it is now. While 
the Japs are busy getting themselves killed for the 
.Mikado's sake they have no time to injure American 
working men and women by taking their jobs at 
Oriental wages. But when the "cruel war is o'er" 
the little brown men will hie themselves hither to 
make a living, instead of staying at home and helping 
pay the expenses of the war. We here on the Pacific 
Coast are, and have for years been, alive to the 
greatest danger that threatens American labor — 
Oriental competition. The great mass of American 
workingmen have but a hazy conception of this dan- 
ger. I L is well that their representatives meet this 
year on the Pacific Coast, which, being the gateway 
of the "Peril," has a proper appreciation of its 
magnitude. 

A writer in Leslie's Weekly treats thus significant- 
ly of the facts regarding the Japanese invasion of 
the Hawaiian Islands: 

The first thing I noticed in Honolulu was that the 
streets were full of Japanese. Men ami women were 
there with scores of Japanese children, and when I 
remarked upon the fact the driver said: "Oh, yes; 
the place is overrun with them. They will be having 
things all their own way here one of these days." 
Remembering that our own flag floated over the city 
we smiled superciliously at this, but just the same 
we had to admit that there were mine Japs in evi 
deuce than any other kind of people excepl the native, 
with his handsome brown face and lithe little body. 

All that need be said by way of comment upon the 
foregoing is that the peculiarity noted in the streets 
of Honolulu is rapidly becoming a feature common 
to the streets of San f'rancisco ami other \\ c 
cities. The American traveler m;n "smile super- 
ciliously" at the suggestion that the Japanese will In 
"having things all their own w a J one of tbesi days," 

but. the American workingman, especially on ih, 
Pacific Coast, is more likely to •■smile on the other 
side of his mouth." 

Left free to do its worst,, Japanese immigration 
spells tin' expulsion of American labor from these 
shores. Treated by the logical method -that is. by 
the Exclusion method — the "Yellow Peril" will ci 
lo lie a menace to American labor. 'I'll, 
danger of the situation is thai, the American people 
may continue to smile, superciliously or otherwise, at 
the ease, instead of laying hold upon it with firm 
and unfaltering hand. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



The Scandinavian Unions. 



The first Danish trade-union formed for 
the specific purpose of securing higher wages 
and shorter hours was organized in 1869. 
During the years 1871-1878 about thirty 
unions were organized, many of which were 
of a semi-political character. From 1878 to 
1884 the trade-union movement progressed 
very slowly and was confined in the main to 
the city of Copenhagen. 

Beginning with the latter year the organi- 
zations began to spread to other parts of 
Denmark, and since 1895 trade-unions have 
been established throughout the country at 
large. 

In 1903 the local unions numbered 1,213, 
with 88,098 members, of which 989 unions, 
with 64,621 members, were affiliated with 
the National Federation (De samvirkende 
Fagforbund). During 1902 and 1903 the 
total number of unions increased by twenty ; 
the total membership, however, decreased by 
8,381 (8.5 per cent). The general strength 
of the Danish trade-unions is shown by the 
following table : 



Year. 


Affiliated with 

"De Samvirkende 

Fiigforbund." 


Unaffiliated. 


Total. 




Unions. 


Mem- 
bers. 


Unions. 


Mem- 
bers. 


Unions. 


Mem- 
bers. 


1900 
1902 
1903 


1,086 
975 
989 


81,269 

7L', 127 
64,621 


109 

218 
224 


15,026 
24,352 
23,477 


1,195 
1,193 
1,213 


96,295 
96,479 
88,098 



Affiliated with the National Federation are 
forty-one organizations of a national char- 
acter and twenty-eight local unions. The 
General Laborers' Union is by far the Larg- 
est organization, having a membership of 
27,644. Other large unions in the Federa- 
tion are the Blacksmiths and Machinists, 
7,077 members; Bricklayers, 5,488 mem- 
bers; Carpenters, 4,081 members; Tailors, 
3,157 members. The Marine Firemen have 
1,100 members. 

Unions of national character which are 
unaffiliated number eleven. The three larg- 
est of these are the Railway Employes, with 
3,701 members; Seamen, with 1,841 mem- 
bers, and Brewery Workmen, with 1,709 
members. 

The dues paid by Danish trade-unionists 
have increased considerably from the time 
the various unions were organized. The fol- 
lowing table shows at a glance the regular 
yearly dues paid in 1900 by 95,030 trade- 
union members: 



Yearly Dues Paid. 
(1 Crown— 26.8 cents). 


Members. 


Percent- 
age. 




22,626 
14,202 
28,458 
15,529 
9,714 
4.501 


23.8 




14.9 




29.9 




16.3 




10.3 




4.8 






Totals 


95,030 


100% 





The oldest Swedish trade-union is the 
Typographical Union, of Stockholm, organ- 
ized in 1846. With few exceptions, how- 
ever, trade-unions were practically unknown 
in that country until the period 1880-1885. 
At present the number of organized workers 
is nearly 70,000. The first national organ- 
ization was formed by the Printers in 1886. 
A National Federation of Labor was organ- 
ized in April, 1899, by eleven national 
unions. In 1903 twenty-six national unions, 



with more than 800 locals and approximately 
40,000 members, were affiliated with the 
Federation. The Factory Employes are the 
largest affiliated organization, having 5,519 
members. Other large unions in the Federa- 
tion are the Wood Workers, with 5,023 mem- 
bers; Transport Workers, 4,175 members, 
and the Masons, with a membership of 
2,690. The total funds in the treasuries of 
twenty-four affiliated national unions on 
January 1, 1903, amounted to 222,776 
crowns (1 crown — 26.8 cents). The total 
cash on hand by the National Federation on 
December 31, 1903, was 76,865 crowns. 

The membership of all Swedish trade- 
unions during 1903 is compiled in the fol- 
lowing table: 





Locals. 


Member- 
ship. 


26 National Unions, affiliated with 


840 
' 59 


40,307 

16,400 
5,144 

7,500* 


UNAFFILIATED. 
National Iron and Metal Workers' 
Union 


National Laborers' Union 


All other miscellaneous organiza- 
tions 








69,861 



* The membership of the miscellaneous group is here approxi- 
mated. 

On October 1, 1882, the printers of Nor- 
way organized the first national union. A 
number of purely local unions existed prior 
to 1882, but little or nothing is known re- 
garding their scope and action. Since 1884 
nearly 500 local unions have been organized; 
and. beginning* in 1SS9, various local unions 
of the same crafts combined into organiza- 
tions on national lines, in general adopting 
the system of organization which had been 
established by the Printers. At present 
there are fifteen national unions with more 
than 15,000 members. In 1899 the Nation- 
al Federation of Labor (Arbeiderness EagL 
I.andsorganisation) was organized. Affiliat- 
ed with the Federation are ten national 
unions, with a membership of nearly 8,500, 
and nine purely local unions, with 350 mem- 
bers. 

The following table shows the total num- 
ber of organized workers in Norway during 
1903-1904: 



Affiliated with the National 
Federation. 


Locals. 


Membership. 


Bakers' National Union 

Shoe Workers' National Union 
Stone Cutters' National Union 
Woodworkers' National Union 
Furniture Makers' National 
Union 


98 
30 
20 
11 
20 

11 

11 
8 

11 
3 
9 


4,460 
821 
714 
500 
464 
310 

266 


Bricklayers' National Union.. 
Bookbinders' National Union. 
Purely Local Unions 


363 
300 
168 
350 






232 


8,716 


Unaffiliated. 


Locals. 


Membership. 


Metalworkers' National Union 

Printers' National Union 

Tailors' National Union 

Street Carmen's National Union 
Harbor and Transport Workers 
Purely Local Unions 


45 

25 

18 

6 


4,777 

1,103 

600 

376 

2,000* 

400* 








94 


9,256 



Total . 



17,972 



* The membership of the Harbor and Transport Workers and 
the unaffiliated purely local unions is approximated, as no recent 
figures are available. 

All the national unions in Norway pub- 
lish their own trade papers. With one ex- 
ception, all national unions maintain a re- 



serve fund for strikes and lockouts. The 
monthly dues paid by members of several 
national unions arc as follows: 

Printers, 1 crown; Bakers, 0.50 crown; 
Bookbinders 0.45 crown; Metal Workers, 
0.43 crown; Molders, 0.35 crown; Stonecut- 
ters, 0.30 crown. All national unions are 
eligible for membership in the National 
Federation, also local unions which have no 
national organizations of their respective 
crafts. Local unions whose national organ- 
izations are, as such, not affiliated with the 
Federation, are also eligible for membership. 

The total number of organized workers 
and the total population of Denmark, Swe- 
den and Norway is shown in the following 
compilation : 





< {TBtuaized 
Workers 

1903-19UI 


Total 
Population 
1900— 19(11 




88,098 
69,351 


2,447,441 




5,136.111 




2,231,395 






Totals 


175,421 


9,815,277 







The facts and figures given in the for* 
going are compiled from standard publica- 
tions of the respective countries by the Im- 
perial German Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
and translated for the Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

B- SciIARRENBERG. 



Canada's Gold. 



The report of the Geological Survey of 
Canada for the last year, recently issued, 
shows that since L896 upward of $97,000,- 
000 worth of gold has been shipped out of 
the < 'anadian Yukon. The production of the 
precious metal* in that district amounted to 
only a few hundred thousand dollars worth 
eight years ago. In 1900 it had leaped to 
$22,000,000, but since that record year it has 
steadily declined several millions each year 
until hist year the production amounted to 
$12,250,000. 

It is stated that practically all this gold 
has been taken out of the wonderfully rich 
(hums contained in about half a dozen creeks 
in the Klondike district, and the decreasing 
production of this wealth is largely attrib- 
uted to the exhaustion of the best deposits. 
Although production is apparently decreas- 
ing, it is shown, on the other hand, that min- 
ing activity in the Yukon is increasing. Ma- 
chinery is being extensively introduced for 
mining operations, with the result that many 
abandoned claims and low-grade gravels are 
now being worked with a good degree of 
profit. 

It would seem from the present condition 
of things in the Yukon that the day when 
the placer miner, with his pan, could in a 
brief space of time secure a vast fortune is 
now a thing of the past. The Yukon is ex- 
periencing the conditions that have resulted 
to all other mining countries, and capitalists 
are now coming forward and are acquiring 
the property and securing the wealth of gold 
which only requires scientific development 
of the mines to successfully produce. The 
cost of mining in the Yukon is consequently 
being greatly reduced as well as the output 
of gold. 

Attention is drawn to the fact that until a 
water supply system is established in the 
Yukon mining district economical mining 
can not be carried on. — New York World. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







the Atlantic Coast. 

Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 







»***#****1 



Seamen and Citizenship. 



American seamen of foreign birth are 
again reminded of the importance of becom- 
ing citizens of this country. It is important, 
both for personal and craft reasons, they they 
should do so. Every man engaged in the 
"pursuit of happiness," as he understands it, 
is in honor bound to do his share as a citizen 
under the Government which protects him in 
that pursuit. Seamen are not exempt from 
this duty, and it can not be too strongly im- 
pressed upon those who sail on our ships 
year after year without becoming citizens 
that they are selfish skulkers who richly 
merit all the harsh criticisms bestowed upon 
them. 

But, apart from his duties as a citizen, 
the seaman owes it to his fellow-craftsmen 
to be a duly qualified voter, and .to exercise 
his right to vote at every opportunity. Sea- 
men, in addition to being citizens, are also 
"wards of the nation," which, freely inter- 
preted, means that they are subject to a 
code of laws which restricts their liberties 
in much the same manner as the common law 
restricts the actions of a minor with a guar- 
dian over him. This condition is a survival 
from the times when merchant seamen were 
a part of the war equipment of the State. 
It still exists because seamen as individuals 
have been unable to successfully combat the 
powerful legal machinery at the disposal of 
the Government. It was only after the for- 
mation of the International Seamen's Union 
that the rights of seamen received any recog- 
nition at all from legislators, and then only 
through the fact that the International Sea- 
men's Union is affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor. 

We earnestly advise all seamen of foreign 
birth sailing on American vessels, who have 
not already done so, to at once take the neces- 
sary steps to become citizens. As citizens 
they would command respect in quarters 
where they are now simply jeered at. As 
citizens they would be in a position to do 
their rightful share toward improving the 
conditions of living under which they and 
their fellowmen have to labor, a duty which 
devolves upon every man who is benefited by 
a change for the better in these conditions. 
In particular, they could render great service 
in getting the Seamen's bill, now pending in 
Congress, enacted into law. This bill em- 
bodies nearly all that is desirable in seamen's 
legislation from the standpoint of public 
necessity, as created by the tremendous 
changes wrought in our industrial and social 
systems by modern civilization. -Its enact- 
ment into law would go a long way toward 
removing from seamen the stigma implied by 
the term, "ward of the nation," and thus 
rescue their calling from the contempt in 
which it is now held by landsmen. This 
consideration alone ought to be sufficient to 
induce every self-respecting American sea- 
man of foreign birth to become a citizen, the 
more so as conditions are likely to arise in 
connection with the coming revision of our 



shipping laws which will work in favor of 
citizen seamen. 

All the seamen's unions affiliated with the 
International body have a clause in their 
Constitutions which provides, in substance, 
that to be eligible, applicants for membership 
must be citizens of the United States or have 
declared their intentions of becoming such. 
It may not be possible under present condi- 
tions governing the shipment of seamen to 
enforce the letter of this provision, but in 
spirit it should be recognized and carried out 
as far as practicable. 



Need of Direct Legislation. 

The need for "direct legislation," the Ini- 
tiative and Referendum, becomes more and 
more apparent with every election, munici- 
pal, State and National. The money power 
of the few now dominates politics, and 
through it the Government, to such an extent 
that the term "representative government," 
as understood by the founders of this repub- 
lic, is a misfit and a misnomer. An over- 
whelmingly great majority of the people 
have practically nothing whatever to say 
about the administration of public affairs. 
Their desires as to any particular issue are 
never consulted, much less heeded. Candi- 
dates for Congress and other public offices 
are nominated by the local political machine, 
owned and operated by "the man higher up," 
and the "common people" may vote for them 
or stay at home on election day, just as they 
please. This is a free country ! Consequent- 
ly, men in office must obey the mandates of 
the power that made them, for upon such 
obedience depends their official life. Under 
a "direct legislation" Government these men 
would be directly responsible for their offi- 
cial acts to the sovereign people, and we 
would then have, in fact as well as in theory, 
a Government of the people, by the people, 
for the people. Therefore, let the working- 
men in every State of the Union educate 
themselves on the subject of "direct legis- 
lation," so that they may be prepared to take 
intelligent action thereon when the time 
comes for it; and unless they are willing to 
intrust all their rights and liberties to a 
moneyed oligarchy, the time for such action 
is already here. 



Boys, in your journeying through life 
don't forget that good old forecastle saw: 
"Shipmates before strangers; watchmates 
before shipmates, and bunkmates before any 
of 'em." That saying epitomizes the philoso- 
phy that charity begins at home, and that 
our friends have the first claim upon our 
sympathies. The man who is all things to 
all men is so because he usually has nothing 
worth anything to offer to anybody. If our 
friends are worth loving at all, they are 
worth loving well. 



Launching Lifeboats. 

It is rather remarkable that in this age 
of wonderful inventions passenger steamers 
should still adhere to the ridiculously primi- 
tive method of lowering and hoisting their 
lifeboats by means of unwieldy davits and 
clumsy tackles requiring the combined ef- 
forts of the entire crew at times for the 
launching of one boat only. It would seem 
that a lightweight, rotating steam crane 
could do the work much more expeditiously 
with a minimum of manual labor. Two of 
these cranes should be placed on the deck 
where the lifeboats are secured, one on each 
side amidships. A wide-gauge wooden or 
iron tramway should be laid fore and aft 
on each side of the deck within the space 
now occupied by the lifeboats. The boat- 
chocks, instead of being bolted to the deck as 
they now are, should be mounted on light, 
low trucks, flanged and gauged to fit the 
tramway. Then, if the boats had to be put 
in the water in a hurry, the crane could be 
connected with the nearest boat, and while 
it was being lowered away the crew could 
toss its truck to one side and get the next 
boat in line for lowering, and so on until all 
the boats had been despatched. 

With a well-drilled crew of seamen the en- 
tire set of boats on one side of a large pas- 
senger steamer could in this way be launched 
in less time than it now takes to launch one. 
The outfit described here would not weigh 
as much as the davits and tackle now needed 
for the purpose, so there can be no objection 
en that score. The crane should be so con- 
structed as to allow of the use of handpower 
in case the steam should from some cause or 
other fail to work. A steam crane would, of 
course, be best suited for the purpose, but any 
kind of cargo derrick would serve almost 
equally well. The main consideration is the 
mobility of the boats by means of a tram- 
way, so that they may be quickly brought 
into the desired position. 

The hooking-on gear would be in the 
shape of a bridle made of wire rope, and 
when handling weakly constructed boats — 
which, by the way, should form no part of 
the life-saving equipment of a passenger 
steamer — it might be advisable to fit the bri- 
dle with a beam sufficiently strong to keep 
the ends of the bridle apart when sustaining 
the weight of the boat. Lowering away with 
a bridle attached to a single purchase has the 
advantage, besides, of keeping the boat on an 
even, keel all the time, a thing which is al- 
most impossible of accomplishment on a dark 
night with the gear at present in use on ves- 
sels. 



A man without ideals will never scale the 
heights of human attainment. 



When one thinks of the meekness with 
which the majority of the people of this 
country submit to be bossed by an insig- 
nificant minority, one is strongly tempted to 
paraphrase Carlyle and say: "The United 
States has a population of 75,000,000 — 
mostly fools." 

(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



Mayor Carter Harrison, of Chii 
has declared that the Germans arc op- 
posed to imperialism, and this may give 
Illinois to Parker. 

Fifteen deaths in twelve days, recent- 
ly, in the same neighborhood of New 
York City, arc all said to have been 
caused by cheap whisky. 

si j. i Arizona, .New Mi 

Oklahoma and Indian Territory will be 
one of the fiiM big questions to come 
before Congress in December. 

Reports of Army Paymasters 3how a 
falling oil in the deposits of money by 
soldiers. Army officers ascribe this to 
the abolition of the canteen. 

Judge Jones, of the United States 
District Court in Alabama, has charged 
lie Grand Jury to investigate lynchings, 
declaring acquittal in Mate courts is 
no bar to Federal prosecutions if the 
Federal Constitution has been violated 

Michael Kupac, an electrician, forty 
years of age, was run down and almost 
instantly killed by a New York Subway 
train at One Hundred and Thirty -sev- 
enth street. This IS the first fatality in 
the Subwaj caused by the operation of 
a train. 

The crew of the extra freight train 
which collided with the Missouri Pacific 
St. Louis Exposition train on Octobei 
10, resulting in the death of twenty-nine 
persons, baa been held responsible foi 
the disaster by the coroner's jury at 
Wnrrensburg, Mo. 

Mr. Dawson, American Minister at 
Santo Domingo, has cabled the State 
Department that the Minister of Fi- 
nance has agreed to pay the award of 
the arbitrators in the case of the 
San Domingo Improvement Company, 
amounting to $4,600,000. 

Public bequests in the will of Mrs. 
Sarah !•'.. Potter, of Boston, Mass., will 

.ill $3,000,000. Beside.. 

providing foi public bequests of si. 145,- 
000 previously announced, the will also 

devise the residual \ estate among thir- 
ty seven chai itable institution-. 
The report of United states Treasurer 

Roberts on the operations of the Treas 
liry for the last fiscal year shows a de- 
li. i, ii, -\ of $41,770,577, caused by Pana- 
ma Canal and St. I.oiiis Exposition ex- 
penditures. Tin' per-capita cireub'iioii 
has reached the maximum of $31.16. 

Peoria county, Illinois, has been se- 
lected bj Judge Kerstcn as the place for 
trial of the [roquois Theatre man- 
slaughter cases. 'the prosecution ob- 
jected, but was "overruled. Change of 
\eiiiie from Chicago was granted on the 
ground of prejudice in that city against 
the defendants. 

Plans have been formulated foi 

ducting experiments in breeding Ameri- 
can carriage horses with the trotting 

horse a. a foundation. The experiments 
are to be conducted at the Colorado Ag- 
ricultural Experiment Station at Fort 
Collins under ent supervision, 

ono having been appropriated by 
ess. 
The House of Deputies of the Epis- 
eopal General Convention, at Boston, 

ntly rejected the proposed amend- 
i forbidding the re-marriage of per- 

divorced. The vote in committee 

of the whole was _M I to 191 in favor of 

the amendment, but only fifty-five dio 

- voted for it, fitly nine votes being 

necessary. 

The annual report of tin- Western 

Union Telegraph Company, issued on 

iber 1-. gives the total revent 
$20,240^390, an incres e of $81,703; to- 
tal expenditure-. $21,361,015, an in- 
, of s'lus.TiiS: net revenue $7,887,- 
47.3. a decrease of $326,007. Thi 
plus for the year, after charges, was 
11,704, a decrease of $407,018. Dur- 
ing the year 66,103 miles of wire have 
been added, making the total wire 
, the Company 1,155,405. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANT'S 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured for 

Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE ONION I.ABEI. ON OUR GOODS ALSO 



liprmain bros. 

New Clothing Store 

Goods Direct from the Factory. 
UINIOIN STORE UISIOIN GOODS 

Wleldwald Block, Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAIN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

Wholesale Dealer in the Choicest of Old Wines 

and Liquors 

BOTTLERS OP SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at the lowest San Francisco prices. 
We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Bencon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
a little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spending 
all you earn, but save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 
splendid opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San 
Francisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that. We offer you lots on 
graded streets with cement sidewalks and curbs, trees planted and water laid 
in, from $350 to $450, at the exceptionally easy terms of $25 cash and $10 
per month until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for 
your lot it will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity 
slip by, but see John Anderson, next door to the new postofnee. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



JOHN HELANDER 

— Dealer in — 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CIGARS 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 

San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

— Dealers In — 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Herald and all San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

BRAND <& LAWYER 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausage ot all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by U. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT STREET, OI*P. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAN PEDRO. CAL 



Q. W. HARVEY 

Th e old Time Expressman 

Solicits Your Patronage. 

Give Him a Call. 

Stand at Front St., Son Pedro, Cal. 



FRED SYENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 
AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



People's Bargain Store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELIAS WEBERG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, 
Notions, Etc. 



S. W. Express 

HANS HENRIKSEN, Proprietor. 

Give your old Comrade a call 
when in San Pedro 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

— Dealer In — 

GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN, also GREEN 

FRUITS and COUNTRY PRODUCE 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO. CAL. 




UNION LABEL 

OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 
stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
in it. The Genuine Union Label Is perforated on the 

four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 

in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 

Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 

using them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 

Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

. . „ JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange. N. J. 

MARTIN LAW LOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union 
Office. 



Chas. Biser 



F. W. Eisenbeis. 



EISENBEIS & SON 

— Dealers In — 
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

-Manufacturers of all kinds of Crackers. 

Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
310 Water St. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas, A. Pragge, Kgr. Chas. E Coon, Pres 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsriul, Wash. 

Warehouse I Bartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend. NVash. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS 

IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest and 
fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

— Dealer in — 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps. Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Dank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLES MARKET 

(Incorporated 

Dealers in LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS and 
VEGETABLES. Wholesale and Retail. 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. ■ 
PORT TOWNSEND. WASH. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

— Dealer In — 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 
Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

BAN PEDRO. CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



INFORMATION WANTED 






Tom Courtney, of Courtmacsherry, 
County Curk, Ireland, is inquired for by 
the British Consulate at San Francisco, 
Cal. 

William Hansen, a cook who left the 
schooner Ethel Zane about three months 
ago in Everett, Wash., is inquired for 
by his wife. Any one knowing of his 
abouts please address Box 2155, 
San Pedro, • 

The following named seamen are in- 
quired for by the Consulate of Sweden 
and Norway at San Francisco: Harry 
Nilsen, from Aaker; Williaw Anderson, 
from Stockholm; Emil Swanson, from 
Gothenburg; B. G. Persson, from Goth- 
enburg; Johan Emil Engebrektson, from 
Gothenburg; George Nordstrom, from 
iiania; Jacob H. Dalland, from 
Siglevik; Olof M. Nelson, from Sweden; 
Fritlijof Ellingsen, from Drammen; Jo- 
hannes Gudmundsen, from Stavanger; 
K. \. Kolderup Wessel, from Chris- 
tiania; Johan Sander Peterson, from 
Briinnef jail ; Ed. P.. Ilerwan, from S 
holm; Edwin Bredesen, from Chris- 
tiania; Gustav Hansen, from Aakei 
Martin Olson, from VaMeroen; John E. ' 
W. Johanson, from Kastlosa; V. M. Lof- 
berg, from Partille. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 




The new ferryboat built at Dickie's yard, Oakland, 
Cal., for the Key Route, will probably be launched 
about November 10. 

The schooner Addenda, recently reported ashore 
on the New Zealand coast, is now reported to have 
got off and proceeded to Newcastle, Australia. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 24: German ship Sirene, 147 
days from Liverpool for Valparaiso, 85 per cent. 

The schooner Abbie F. Morris, nineteen days from 
Behring Sea, arrived at San Francisco on October 23, 
with 2,000 codfish consigned to the master of the 
vessel. 

John E. Wynne, chief engineer of the steamer State 
of California, has been appointed an Assistant In- 
spector of Boilers under Local Inspector John K. 
Bulger at San Francisco. 

Fred Linderman has placed an order at the Ben- 
dixen yard at Eureka, Cal., for another steam- 
schooner, to be larger than the steamer Bee, lately 
built for him at that yard. 

The schooner Alice Kimball, from San Francisco, 
went ashore one mile south of the mouth of the Sius- 
law River, Or., on October 19, and became a total 
wreck. The crew were saved with great difficulty. 

Olaf Anderson, master of the trading schooner 
Vine, was held in $500 bail by United States Com- 
missioner Heacock, at San Francisco on October 24, 
for beating his Kanaka cook, John Saunders, on the 
high seas. 

Construction of a huge dredger for H. A. Voorman, 
for use at Bouldin Island, has begun at the yards of 
W. A. Boole & Son, at Oakland, Cal. The* dredger 
will be 45 by 90 feet in size, and therefore one of the 
largest on the Coast. 

I'hfi barkentine Gardiner City arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on October 18, fourteen days from Taeoma, 
Wash., and reported having encountered heavy- 
weather on the Coast, during which 100,000 feet of 
lumber was jettisoned. 

The British bark Sofala, from Barry, Eng., for 
Vancouver, B. C, previously reported at Stanley, 
Falkland Islands, is still there, with her decks leak- 
ing badly. The vessel lost twelve sails, but is her- 
self in good condition. 

The British ship Lonsdale, from Shields for Port 
Los Angeles, Cal., put into Valparaiso on October 17, 
with rigging badly damaged. The German bark Pri- 
mus, horn Aberdeen, Scotland, for Honolulu, put into 
the same port for stores. 

The steamer Stanley Dollar, erroneously reported 
as having been chartered to carry lumber from Puget 
Sound to Shanghai, is to load a general cargo at San 
Francisco for Hongkong, and has alreadybegun tak- 
ing in freight at Steuart-street wharf. 

The steamer Coos Bay, while coming up the Coast 
from San Pedro, lost her rudder off Cayucos, and 
for several hours on October 24 lay helpless outside 
San Francisco Heads. A tugboat brought the steam- 
er into the harbor on the same evening and docked 
her at the Seawall. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., of San Francisco, have 
libeled the British ship Glenburn for $2,000, alleging 
that through careless unloading of tin plate, 392 
packages were broken and left uncoopered on the 
dock and consequently spoiled by the heavy rain on- 
the night of September 22. 

The ship Star of Italy, Captain Wester, twenty 
days from Pyramid Harbor and sixteen days from 
Loring, Alaska, arrived at San Francisco on October 
21 with a caigo of 42,115 eases of salmon. The bark 
Servia, eleven days from Karluk, also arrived with 
a cargo of 48,600 cases of salmon. 

The sunken steamer City of Topeka was floated at 
Seattle, Wash., on October 17. An examination 
shows that the main, hurricane and weather decks 
are a mass of filth and slime. The vessel's furnish- 
ings throughout are ruined and she will have to be 
refitted at a cost of about $50,000. 

The schooner Emma Claudina arrived at Seattle, 
Wash., on October 17, from the Northeastern Siberian 
Coast, where she has been trading, in a sinking con- 
dition. During a storm at sea she sprung a leak 
and had three feet of water in her hold when she 
tied up at the West Seattle shipyard for repairs. 

Local Inspectors of Hulls and Boilers John K. 
Bulger and O. F. Bolles, at San Francisco on October 
18, suspended the license of Captain S. Bonnifleld for 
six months for running the new steamer Northland 
ashore on September 19 off Point Pinos light. The 
license of Peter Hedvall, first-mate, was revoked. 

The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's steamer 
Cottage City arrived at Seattle, Wash., on October 
21, from Skagway, Alaska, with 150 passengers and 
gold amounting to $126,000. Officers of the Cottage 
City report that water is low in the Yukon River, 
and that the last boats are having great difficulty 
m getting over the bars. 

Severe weather was experienced by the schooner 
San Buena Ventura, which arrived at San Francisco 
on October 23, fourteen days from Gray's Harbor, 
Wash. On October 10, in latitude 46 degrees 41 
minutes north, longitude 124 degrees 48 minutes 
west, a southeast gale carried away the schooner's 
foremast head, the maintopmast and the outer-jib 
stay. 

The huge freight steamer Minnesota, built on the 
Eastern coast for James J. Hill's line, connecting 
Puget Sound with the Orient, put into Bahia, Brazil, 
on October 20. to get 800 tons of water for the 
boilers. The vessel is to make her first call in the 
Pacific at San Francisco. As before reported, the 



Minnesota is larger than any vessel ever in the 
Pacific. 

The steamers St. Paul and Portland, both owned 
by the Alaska Commercial Company, are reported to 
have sailed on October 19 from Nome, Alaska, for 
Seattle, Wash., on their way to San Francisco. Their 
departure from the Alaskan port is very late in the 
season, but both vessels are expected to reach Puget 
Sound before the ice finally sets in along the far 
northern coast. 

The annual report of Rear-Admiral Manney, Chief 
of the Bureau of Equipment, Navy Department, 
shows that $168,808.24 was expended for labor at 
the Mare Island (Cal.) Navy Yard during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1904, and $152,549.67 for ma- 
terial, making a total of $321,357.91 under the Bu- 
leau. Appropriations amounting to about $500,000 
are recommended. 

The following changes in shipmasters were recorded 
at San Francisco on October 21: Captain Weber, 
vice Levinson, on the steamer Despatch ; Captain 
Burtis, vice Macgenn, on the steamer Empire ; Cap- 
tain Jamieson, vice Bonnifleld, on the steamer North- 
land; Captain Leland, vice Nicolson, on the steamer 
Bonita; Captain Thomas, vice Cousins, on the Queen, 
and Captain Nicolson, vice Thomas, on the State of 
California. 

Two of the vessels that have for some weeks past 
been posted as overdue were crossed from the rein- 
surance list on October 22, both having reached their 
destinations. The British ship Andreta arrived at 
Falmouth, Eng., 171 days from Sydney, N. S. W., and 
the Italian ship Rosalia d'Ali arrived at Delaware 
Breakwater, 157 days from New Caledonia. Reinsur- 
ance at the rate of 50 and 5 per cent, respectively, 
had been offered on the vessels. 

Under charter to Roth, Blum & Co., of San Fran- 
cisco, the new steamer Harold Dollar sailed on Octo- 
ber 20 for Petropaulovski with a good-sized general 
cargo for the Kamschatkan port. The shipments in- 
cluded 10,000 pounds of sugar, 375 barrels of flour, 
20,000 pounds of salt, 4,000 pounds of rice, 2,600 
pounds of tobacco and much other merchandise. Some 
haste will be made on the voyage, on account of the 
lateness of the season. The Dollar is to bring back 
a cargo of furs from the Siberian coast. 

United States District Judge de Haven, in the 
United States District Court at San Francisco on 
October 24, rendered judgment in favor of P. B. 
Cornwall and others and against J. J. Moore & Co. 
for $3,662 damages with interest and costs for breach 
of charter party. The complainant alleged that the 
defendants chartered the ship Spartan on January 
16, 1902, to carry grain from San Francisco to Aus- 
tralia, and that they refused to carry out the con- 
tract, alleging that the ship was unseaworthy. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Port- 
land and Asiatic Steamship Company, held at Port- 
land, Or., on October 12, the Executive Committee of 
the Company and the officers of the Board for the year 
1905 were elected. The Executive Committee will 
consist of E. H. Harriman, W. D. Cornish and W. D. 
Pierce, all of New York. E. H. Harriman was elected 
President and Chairman of the Board; W. D. Cornish, 
Vice-President; R. P. Sehwerin, of San Francisco, 
Vice-President and General Manager; W. W. Cotton, 
of Portland, Secretary, and Alexander Miller, of New 
York, Assistant Secretary. 

The annual report of the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company for the year ended June 30, issued on Octo- 
ber 20, shows total earnings of $5,902,972, an increase 
of $296,218; total expenses, $4,717,943, an increase 
of $323,168; net earnings, $1,185,029, a decrease of 
$26,948. The surplus for the year, after paying divi- 
dends and other charges, is $1,717,267, an increase 
of $266,726. The increase in operating expenses is 
accounted for in the annual report by repairs and 
renewals, formerly charged to steamship deprecia- 
tion and renewal fund being charged to operating 
expenses. There was expended and charged to oper- 
ating expenses for repairs and renewals to engines, 
boilers and equipment, $403,929, an increase of $199,- 
771. Additional steamers could be operated to ad- 
vantage, and in view of the continuous increase of 
business and population on the Pacific Coast, it may 
be wise to build or purchase, in the near future, at 
least two modern vessels. 

LIlLiilllUULIIII IIIIIIIIIIII11IBMMIIIIIIIII IMI1WIIIMIWIW II 

DIED. 

Otto Abrahamscn, No. 295, a native of Sweden, 
aged 44, died at San Francisco, Cal., October 19, 1904. 

Victor Burg, No. 337, a native of Sweden, aged 50, 
died at San Francisco, Cal., October 18, 1904. 

J. Butler, No. 399, of the Fishermen's Union of the 
Pacific Coast and Alaska, a native of the United 
States, aged 26, drowned at Pyramid Harbor, Alaska, 
September 20, 1904. 

F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine 
law in this city. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Rooms 8 and 10, 508 California 
street. Telephone Grant 163. 



Geo. E. Nalder, a member of the Sailors' Union, 
No. 555, is inquired for. Anyone knowing anything 
as to his present whereabouts please notify the 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Baglcy's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches, and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



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MAI/ 




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OFFICIAL 





SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 24, 1904. 

B.egular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., C. Taueer in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. A Shipwreck Committee was elected 
to investigate the application for Shipwreck Benefit 
made by the crew of the Alice Kimball. 

Notice — Election of delegates to the convention of 
the International Seamen's Union of America will be 
held at the next regular meeting at Headquarters and 
agencies. Ballots will be cast at one meeting only. 
A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Red 208. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 17, 190 1. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
Shipping and general situation unchanged. 

Wm. Thobbeck, Agent. 
88Vo Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. No. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
Shipping poor. 

Wm. Goiil, Agent. 
N. E. cor. F and Heron sts. P. O. Box 334. Tel, 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. Paul, Agent, 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood No. 352. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 10, 1904. 
Shipping slack: prospects poor. 

J. W. Ericksen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 327. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

H. Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 178. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct, 10, 1904. 
Situation unchanged. 

F. Larsen, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' 
ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. • 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 20, 1904. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 8 
p. m., J. O'Connor in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping quiet. The date of voting for delegates to 
the ninth annual convention of the Internationa] 
Seamen's Union of America was set for three con- 
secutive meetings, beginning October 27, 1904. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 

Seattle Agency, Oct. 13, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

R. Powers, Agent, 

San Pedro Agency, Oct. 13, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

G. A. Lloyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Oct. 15, 1904. 
General situation unchanged. 

Wm. Pen.je, Secretary. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Providence (R. I.) Agency, Oct. 18, 1904. 
Shipping medium ; prospects uncertain. 

James Wilson Agent. 



New York (N. Y.) Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
Shipping slack. 

John Corbett, Agent. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquuabters, Brooklyn, N. Y.,Oet. 14, 1904. 

Shipping slack genei il situation f ill. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
COAST AND ALASKA. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 21, 1 004. 

Tin' regular weekly meeting of the Fishermen's 
Protective Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska was 
called to order at 9 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. 
The Committee 011 Ballots for delegates to the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America i ation was 

instructed to have the Amendment to Article XII, 
Section B, printed on the same ballot. The report oi 
the Quarterly Finance Committee was 

I. \ T . II viv.v. Secretary. 

9 Mission st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's 
Journal 



Published Weekly by 
THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W. MACARTBVR. . .Editor | P. SCHARRENBERO, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail, - $2.00 | Six months, - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday noon 
of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should address 
all communications of a business nature to the Business 
Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second-class 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, south- 
west corner East and Mission streets, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the Journal provided they are of general interest, 
brief, legible, written on one side only of the paper, and 
accompanied by the writer's name and address. The 
Journal is not responsible for the expressions of cor- 
respondents, nor for the return of manuscript. 



^ TRAPES r^?,J C OUNCIL > 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2(i, 1904. 



THE SLOCUM REPORT. 



The report of the special commission ap- 
pointed at the instance of President Roose- 
velt to investigate the circumstances <>f the 
Slocum holocaust, which has jusl been made 
public, affords a fair prospect of definite 
and tangible results in the overhauling of 
the law and the personnel of the Steamboat 
Inspection Service. Regarding the latter 
phase of the subject, action has already 
been taken by the removal from office of 
Robert S. Rodie, Supervising Inspector, and 
James A. Dumont and Thomas A. Barrett, 
Local Inspectors at New York, these officials 
having been held directly responsible for the 
inefficiency of the [nspection Service in the 
latter port. President Roosevelt has in- 
structed the Secretary of Commerce and 
Labor to institute a thorough examination 
of the Inspection Service with the object 
of weeding out all incompetent men; also. 
to order a searching investigation into the 
conduct of the central office and of every sub- 
division of the Service outside of New Fork. 

Regarding the Steamboat Inspection laws, 
President Roosevelt approves and lavs strong 
emphasis upon the proposal of the special 
commission "that there be created by law a 
special body thoroughly to investigate the 
laws which are supposed to provide for the 
safety of passengers on Bteamboats, espec- 
ially on excursion boats, where the prime 
causes of danger are the overcrowding and 
the flimsy and highly inflammable character 
of the superstructure." The commission's 
findings and the President's unqualified ap- 
proval thereof leave no room for doubt or 
evasion on the part of Congress. 

The details of the report are highly inter- 
esting in their painful and shameful way. 
It is declared that the General Slocum "was 
not abnormal, but typical;" thai thai craft 
no more dangerous than scores of other 
steamers still carrying passengers in the port 
of New York, and hundreds of similar ves- 



sels elsewhere." The nmnber of persons 
who perished on the Slocum was 955. The 
reinspection of 268 vessels showed that fire- 
pumps, hose and life-preservers were in bad 
condition, although all had been passed as 
good. On excursion boats the percentage of 
deficiency in life-saving apparatus was 33; 
on ferry boats it was 14. Adverting to the 
life-preserver frauds committed by the Non- 
pareil Cork Works, of Camden, N. J., Presi- 
dent Roosevelt characterizes that offense as of 
"so heinous a character that it is difficult to 
comment upon it with proper self-restraint." 
The President continues: "It appears that 
the National Legislature has never enacted 
a law providing in set terms for the punish- 
ment of this particular species of infamy, 
doubtless because it never entered the head 
of any man, that so gross an infamy could 
ho perpetrated." 

Notwithstanding these evidences of a sin- 
cere and energetic effort to prevent a repe- 
tition of the Slocum affair, it is to be re- 
gretted that nothing definite, nor even indefi- 
nite, -' •en is to have been done with reference 
to the manning question. This phase of the 
subject ought to be called prominently to the 
attention of Congress. The manning ques- 
tion — that is, the question of the numbers 
and competency of the men employed to 
handle the vessels — is the key-tone and 
crux of the whole subject. Unless action 

be taken to insure that vessels shall in future 
be manned by seamen instead of by roust- 
abouts, as at present, the entire scheme of 
reform in the Steamboal Inspection laws 
will prove ineffective. Lacking the men to 
put it into practice, the best law that was 
ever enacted becomes merely so much pro- 
nunciamento. 



The Joint Committee on Arrangements 
for the reception of delegates to the forth- 
coming convention of the International Sea- 
Union of America has completed its 
plans. The programme, which has been ap- 
proved by the affiliated unions of the Pacific 
District, will be published in these columns 
a1 an early date. Meanwhile, the Bub-com- 

mittee, composed of Comrade- 0. J. Har- 
rington, I. X. Hylen and J. O'Connor, ap- 
pointed to receive the delegates upon their 
arrival in San Francisco, requests that due 
notice be given regarding the traveling 
arrangements of the delegates. A telegram 
from Ogden, Utah, or other near-by point, 
will apprise the sub-committee of the pros- 
pective hour of arrival. Address, P. Schar- 
renberg, S. W. cor. East and Mission streets, 
San Francisco. 



The adherence of the trade-union to purely 
economic lines of action conserves its effi- 
ciency in a two-fold way; it concentrates the 
thoughl and action of those already in the 
union, and it makes for the extension of 
organization among non-members. 



Upon trade-unionism the workers must 
depend for their hopes of future progress. 
Anything that tends to weaken that institu- 
tion must, in the final analysis, be regarded 
;.- inimical to the true interests of the work- 
ing class. 



AGAINST AXTI-SCALPIXG. 



With the approach of the legislative term 
in many States, the opposition of the labor 
organizations to all forms of Anti-Scalping 
law should be renewed and redoubled. As 
an aid in this work, we reprint the resolu- 
tions on the subject adopted by the last con- 
vention of the American Federation of La- 
bor, as follows: 

Whereas, Having signally failed in recent years, be- 
cause of t lie intense opposition by organized labor to 
such measures, to pass Anti-Scalping bills in any of 
the States of the Union or in the United States 
Congress, the great railroad trusts, represented by 
the SO-called passenger associat inn-, arc now en- 
deavoring to accomplish by injunction what they 
have failed to secure by direct legislation; and, 

Whereas, Because of the proposed great World's 
Fail at St. Louis, and the necessity for cheap rail- 
road fares to secure a large attendance, the railroad 
trust, taking advantage of the situation, declared 
thai the usual reduced rates for such occasions will 
not be made unless ticket brokerage be destroyed by 
city ordinances and injunctions, thus permitting them 
to profit enormously by the forfeiture of return cou- 
pons in the hands of excursionists and others who 
may be unable to use them personally, and which 
iln\ would make it criminal t<> sell; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the American Federation of Labor in 
this it- twenty-third annua] convention assembled, 
thai all railroad transportation should be good to 
the bearer, and that it is an outrage to require the 
signatures of purchasers upon ticket-. We also pro- 
test against the nuisance of joint agencies and other 
identification annoyances as an unnecessary imposi- 
tion upon excursionists and travelers; 

Resolved, That the thanks of t'ni- convention be 
I to \ho Central Trades and Labor Union and 
the Building Trades Council of St. Louis, Kansas 
City, and other cities of Missouri, ami to the labor 
unions of Texas for their recent successes in defeating 
Anti-Scalping bills in their State Legislatures, and 
especially rei mend the St. Louis union, to con- 
tinue the good fighl in resisting these obnoxious laws, 
ordinances and injunctions during the period of the 
\\ orld's Fair in that city ; 

Resolved, That the resolutions adopted at each of 
the last -i\ annual convention, of thi- Federation 
denouncing anti-scalping, federal ami state Anti- 
Scalping laws, city ordinances ami injunctions be 
reaffirmed; 

Resolved, Thai we again request all State Federa- 
tions, Centra] Trades and Labor Councils and labor 
union- allied with the American Federation of La- 
bor, to use every effort to defeat Anti-Scalping hills 
and cit\ ordinances inimical to ticket brokerage, and 
again in-truct our Legislative Committee at Wash- 
ington to oppose all Anti-Scalping hills thai have 
been, or may he introduced in the United States 
( ongreas. 

In this connection, a recent press report 

of the convention of General Passenger 
Agents, held at Port Monroe, Va., is worth 
noting. It is -aid that "the aggregate animal 
of the railroads of the United States 
through the operations of ticket-scalpers is 
estimated at $10,000,000 by the Railway 
Protective Bureau." The latter organiza- 
tion, by the way. i- a species of detective 

agency whose business it is to "smoke out" 

the scalpers, iheir allies and patrons. The 
-inn here named, although probably greatly 
exaggerated, represents approximately the 
Bum saved by the traveling public by the dis- 
posal and use of rickets unused by the origi- 
nal purchasers. At the convention of Gen- 
eral Passenger Agents it was brought out 
that "the efforts of the Protective Bureau 
and of a great detective agency to chock 
ticket-scalping are futile, and that the evil 
is on the increase." It was also shown that 
even the railroad companies themselves fre- 
quently connive at ticket-scalping. Ml of 
which is very significant and very natural. 
It is the old story of failure to enforce rules. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



regulations or laws which are opposed to 
public interest and public conscience. No 
proposition designed to penalize a person for 
disposing of his or her own property to the 
mutual advantage of buyer and seller can 
ever be made to stick. Such a proposition 
is opposed to common sense. A man has as 
much right to dispose of a surplus railroad 
ticket as to dispose of a surplus hat. Such, 
in a word, is the essence of the case, and the 
railroad companies must meet the issue upon 
that basis. If the railroad companies have 
any grievance against the scalpers on ac- 
count of tickets purchased for scalping pur- 
poses or on any other account, they should 
fight for protection against the scalpers, in- 
stead of, as their present methods imply, 
for revenge upon the public. In any event, 
the railroad companies must come to the 
public and the lawmakers with clean hands; 
in other words, they must deal justly with 
the public before they can expect to receive 
public support in their troubles, real or as- 
sumed. In the meantime organized labor 
■will continue its fight for the individual 
right to acquire and dispose of property in 
railroad tickets or other form, by opposing 
every species of Anti-Scalping measure, 
whether introduced in municipal, State or 
National legislature. 



LABOR PRESS AND POLITICS. 



Apropos the tendency of many labor pa- 
pers to run after the band-wagon in these 
days of political fuss and fury, the United 
Mine Workers' Journal utters a very timely 
and sensible word of warning, as follows : 

We note with regret that the labor press is whoop- 
ing up politics for their respective sides, and worst 
of all are denouncing their former co-workers as 
"voting cattle," "slaves of monopolies," "traitors," 
"sell-outs," "fakirs," etc. Now, gentlemen, this is all 
wrong and bodes evil for the future of organized 
labor. The country is going to survive this election, 
no matter who is elected, but whether organized labor 
can survive a war between its organs is problematical. 
Shout for Roosevelt if you will ; hurrah for Parker 
if you want; sing Debs's praises if you can, but quit 
using acerbity and bitter personalities, and, above 
all, cease attempting to carry the impression that the 
members of labor unions will follow your lead. Men 
who have brains enough to join a labor union also 
have the ability to decide how they will cast their 
votes. Politics never did anything for organized 
labor. Politics put the Eight-Hour law on the stat- 
ute books only to have the judiciary decide it uncon- 
stitutional. But you have it, nevertheless, because 
of your union. Politics did not secure the joint con- 
ference, or the joint agreement or the check-weigh- 
men. Politics put the two-weeks' pay in the law 
books, but your organization made it secure. The 
judges said it "violated the right of contract," but 
you have it because your organization secured it. 
Politics may pass a law, but without your organiza- 
tion it is not worth the paper upon which it is writ- 
ten. If you doubt this review the scrip law, the 
ventilation Acts, the mine inspector laws, the fac- 
tory laws, the child labor laws. What good were 
they until your organization secured their enforce- 
ment? Play politics if you must, but cease trying 
to use your organization as an instrument to further 
the political ends of your party. 

These views are to be commended as much 
for their truthful portrayal of the spectacle 
presented by the warring labor editors as for 
the soundness of the moral conveyed, i. e., 
that, whatever be the results of the election, 
labor must depend upon labor organization 
for its protection and advancement. Such 
being the case, why all this crimination and 
recrimination between men who on main 



points and vital issues are agreed, and who 
deep down in their hearts have nothing but 
love and admiration for each other ? We do 
not suggest that the labor editor should cut 
away from any form of activity, political 
or otherwise, among his fellows ; on the con- 
trary, we believe that he should get into 
these activities and, if need be, fight for the 
furtherance of his views therein. All that 
we do contend for is that the labor editor, 
when acting as such, shall come to his work 
with wholesouled devotion to the labor cause, 
leaving all his doubts and disagreements re- 
garding other causes to be fought out at 
other times and in other places. 



IS THERE A JAP EXODUS? 



The Report of the State Labor Commissioner, which 
has just been submitted to the Governor, lays par- 
ticular stress on the large immigration of Japanese 
to the State and its industrial effects. In the two 
decades between 1880 and 1000 the number of Japan- 
ese in the United States increased from 86 to 10,151. 
Since the latter year, the Commissioner represents 
that 10,524 Japanese have landed in this port alone, 
coming direct from Japan, while during the last 
twenty months 7,942 have arrived here from Hono- 
lulu and Victoria, B. C. The Report asserts that at 
least 20,000 have entered here since 1900. Special 
attention is called to the fact that this increase in 
the Japanese population is occurring while Chinese 
residents in the country are materially decreasing, 
and it is asserted that the Japanese are crowding 
both the Chinese and whites out of the various 
branches of labor. 

It is quite evident that the immigration of the 
little brown men is assuming serious proportions. 
Our laws place no restraint, of course, on their in- 
coming, and they have consequently taken advantage 
of the situation to enter unobserved. There can be 
no doubt in the mind of any thoughtful citizen that 
their unrestrained immigration, if it continues in 
future on a corresponding scale with that of the past 
twenty-four years, is liable to create a racial and 
industrial situation here quite as grave as that which 
unrestricted Chinese immigration created. Although 
the Oriental war had not produced any apparent effect 
on Japanese immigration up to the time the Com- 
missioner's Report was prepared, there are some evi- 
dences at present that the campaign has reached a 
stage when the Japanese Government will have to 
call in its citizens abroad to serve in the military 
reserves. In fact, it is reported that Japanese located 
at Salinas and Sacramento have received orders from 
the Government to return at once to Japan, and that 
the return movement has already begun. It will be 
interesting to observe what will be the extent and 
general effect of this emigration. — San Francisco 
Chronicle. 

The Journal deeply regrets that it can 
not place much hope in the prospective exo- 
dus of Japs from these shores. These re- 
ports of "orders from the Government" look 
like so nnich diplomatic jobbery, designed to 
allay Exclusion sentiment. We have expe- 
rienced instances of the same sort at various 
times in the recent past. In fact, it is one 
of the commonest characteristics of these 
people, that they are always "going to go." 
However, it seems to be a case of "mark 
time ;" with all his hustling back to Japan 
to fight for the Mikado, the little brown man 
stays right in California. If the alleged 
exodus should prove to be a fact, so much the 
better. In that case we can all get in behind 
the Japs and give them a boost, meanwhile 
taking care to close and bolt the Exclusion 
door behind them. 



Joaquin Miller, in the October Arena, de- 
clares that "we all need and all want the 
Chinese with us; all, all except the labor 
unions !" Joaquin's views need not cause 



any surprise among those who have been un- 
der the impression that public sentiment in 
California is practically unanimous for the 
exclusion of the yellow and brown men of 
the Orient. That impression is still correct. 
The trouble with our old friend Miller is 
that, being a poet, he knows absolutely noth- 
ing, and probably cares less, about the mun- 
dane affairs of his fellows. His antipathy 
to the labor unions is akin to that with which 
he regards the word that can't be rhymed — 
they're unpoetical, you know. Per contra, 
the Chinaman is all right for the purposes 
of a song, especially as he never sings him- 
self. That's all that's the matter with Miller. 
As to the gentleman's article in general, it 
is of no more practical bearing upon the facts 
of to-day than are Homer's views on the siege 
of Troy. 



Governor Pardee of California has granted 
a further reprieve of two weeks from the 
28th inst. to William Buckley, now under 
sentence of death for murder. This action 
gives assurance that the Governor will care- 
fully consider the arguments presented on 
the plea for commutation to life imprison- 
ment. With that assurance, the outlook for 
ultimate success is encouraging. 



The merits of any theory of government 
can only be judged in practice. The whole 
difference between success and failure in 
political affairs is the difference between 
theory and practice, between the theory that 
has been tried and that which continues to be 
merely talked about. 



"World's Greatest Ships. 

At the end of the nineteenth century tiie 
number of merchant vessels of 10,000 tons 
and over was under half a dozen, but since 
then huge steamers have multiplied to such 
an extent that at present they are not far 
short of 100. More than half belong to Eng- 
land, and are employed in trade with the 
United States. Germany already possesses 
twenty-six steamers of over 10,000 tons each, 
and is preparing to build more. Ere long 
Germany may aim at the construction of ves- 
sels that will rival the Baltic in dimensions 
and the new Cunarders in speed. 

Such vessels do, however, put a great strain 
upon the resources of the ports of the United 
Kingdom and other nations. The creation 
of great ships has been quicker than the ar- 
rangements for their reception and berthing. 
The Clyde trustees have been foremost in 
designing docks to meet the wants of the 
largest of steamers and in obtaining the sanc- 
tion of Parliament for widening and deepen- 
ing the navigable channel by which these 
docks are approached. Other local bodies are 
doing the same. How far these big ships are 
justified by the condition of the ocean carry- 
ing trade is doubtful. If they can obtain an 
ample supply of cargoes their size has de- 
cided advantages, as their working expenses 
compared with smaller vessels are propor- 
tionately less. But such cargoes are not al- 
ways obtainable, and the ports which can 
take in these monsters are few. — Page's 
Magazine. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Legal Martyrs. 

Justice is by no means infallible. Every 
year Bees a number of innocent men wrongly 
convicted, and while in some cases proofs 
of these judicial errors come to hand after 
the victims have served hut a few months' 
imprisonment, in many instances the mis- 
takes arc nol found ou1 until after those con- 
victcil have served their full sentence. 

The public rarely hear- of these mistakes 
of justice, and yet in 1897 thirty-one men 
and women were released and granted a free 
pardon after having been wrongly impris- 
oned for over four months. In none of these 
were the victims granted any compen- 
sation, nor does the law entitle them to re- 
dress in any shape or form, while not so 
much as a written or unwritten apology is 
their lot. 

In cases of mistaken identity, similar to 
that of Adolf Heck, there are very U~w prece- 
dents of compensatory bounty having been 
granted, while those on record do not show 
a dispensation of very large sums. How- 
ever, some sixty years ago a most flagrant 
instance of miscarriage of justice occurred. 
A well-known solicitor named Barker was, 
after a long trial, convicted of forgery, and 
was sentenced to transportation for life. 

A considerable time elapsed before proofs 
turned up which infallibly proved that jus- 
tice had erred. In this case it was fell that 
there were moral and intellectual claims for 
compensation for suffering which had been 
borne so long, so terribly and so undeserved- 
ly on the shoulders of an innocent man. A 
long debate was held to determine the exact 
sum of money which could, in some measure 
at least, make up for the personal agony 
which the victim had undergone, and eventu- 
ally the House of Commons ordered the 
wronged man a bounty of l*.">.000. 

Some three years ago a man from New 
Zealand was brought to Colchester, charged 
with having committed murder. Eventu- 
ally, however, the case againsl him was dis- 
missed, and taking into accounl the fearful 
strain which the innocent man must have 
Buffered, the Treasury granted him £600. 

The largesl sum which has ever been 
granted in almost exactly similar conditions 
to those under which Adolph Beck wrong- 
fully suffered imprisonment, occurred ex- 
actly twenty-eighl years ago, when a man 
named Habron was convicted of murder at 
Manchester. Fortunately, proofs of his in- 
nocence turned up, but not until some time 
later. Never had justice committed a great- 
er mistake, and, although ir was felt that it 
would be impossible to adequately compen- 
sate the victim of this extraordinary ca 
mistaken identity, he was only granted a 
sum of t: 1,000. 

There are numerous cases of mistaken 
identity in which the wrongfully convicted 
man has not received one penny of compen- 
Q. In 1895, a man named Stewart was 
charged with being an escaped convict. 
He firmly protested that his name was Stick- 



ler, but the evidence was so strong against 
him that he was sent back to prison. Two 
years elapsed before the police arrested a 
man who was exactly like Stewart, and then 
it was discovered that this man was the 
erstwhile missing gaolbird. 

Stickler, of course, was immediately re 
; . but could claim no redress, and his 
only consolation was thai he had nol been 
compelled to -erve the full sentence. 

The exact value of circumstantial evidence 
LS a much discussed question. William 
Shaw, some years ago, was hanged on cir- 
cumstantial evidence for the murder of his 
daughter, dust over a year after his execu- 
tion the tenant who rented Shaw's house 
discovered a letter written by the supposed 
murdered girl, in which she stated that as 
the man she loved had jilted her, she had 
made up her mind to commit suicide. The 
authorities were, of course, unable to expiate 
this terrible mistake: hut the dead man's 
body was turned over to his relations for re- 
interment, while flags were waved over the 
grave, and prominent officials attended the 
funeral in token that Shaw's innocence was 
recognized. — London Answers. 



Aid to Navigation. 

Sirens and fog bells, owing to the varying 
conditions of the atmosphere and its capa- 
bilities of distorting and diverting sound, are 
oftentimes misleading and a source of dan- 
ger. The transmission of sound by water, 
however — a stable medium and capable of 
conveying a signal for a long distance unaf- 
fected by outside influences — would seem to 
overcome the difficulties now experienced by 
tin appliances at present in use and render 
navigation as safe as when the different 
buoys and marks can be seen. 

The apparatus in use can be briefly de- 
scribed as follows: Upon the lightships and 
headlands, where lights are placed, a hell 
weighing some 000 pounds is suspended be- 
neath the water and rung automatically, the 
tone and the stroke varying so that different 
hells can he known and locations indicated. 
The vessels are fitted with submarine trans- 
mitters placed in the bow, and these arc con- 
nected with the bridge or pilothouse and fur- 
nished with two ordinary telephone receiv 
ers, starboard and port. The officer in com- 
mand by means of a switch can determine 
by the sound on which side he is approach- 
ing and thereby locate his position. 

A- the electrical transmitters are peculiar- 
ly sensitive, it is readily seen how valuable 
the invention may be to naval vessels in time 
of war: the facility by which signals can be 
interchanged with different ships of the 
squadron, the approach of hostile \ 
made known by the throbbing of the screws, 
and the deiect ion and locating of submarine 

boats. 

The glials have been distinctly heard at 

the distance .» miles, and directions as- 

ci rtained within one quarter of a point. 
Navy League Journal. 



A Flow of Language. 

Twelve hundred wires are now enclosed 
in a telephone cable two and one-half inches 
in diameter. Until recently 800 was the 
largest number of wires placed in a single 
cable. Through one of the new cables words 
spoken into 600 telephones may flash simul- 
taneously to be heard by the persons at 600 
other telephones, each message undisturbed 
by the hundreds of others with which the 
wires are alive. The cable looks like a lead 
pipe intended for carrying water, but should 
water enter it the cable would at once become 
worthless. Each of the 1,200 wires in the 
cable is wrapped in paper to secure insula- 
tion, but the paper is not the insulating me- 
dium. Dry air in the folds of the wrappings 
and in the paper itself prevents the wander- 
f words from one wire to another. To 
counteract various electrical influences that 
would impede transmission, the wires are 
twisted and transposed at frequent intervals. 

Many processes are necessary in the man- 
ufacture of the cable. Among other things, 
it is thoroughly baked in great ovens that 
every vestige of moisture may be driven from 
among the wires. When the lead sheath has 
been closed it is absolutely airtight, and, in 
suspending the cable from poles or drawing 
it into conduits under the streets, great care 
must he taken to prevent injury, for a hole 
no larger than that made by a pin in a piece 
of paper will admit moisture and make a 
section of cable worthless. 

Equal care is necessary when two sections 
of cable are being joined. Then the ends of 
the wins must be exposed to the air, but 
after the 1,200 in one section have been 
spliced to the 1,200 in the other by twisting 
them together, melted paraffin is poured over 
the joint to keep out the moisture and a lead 
sleeve is soldered over the connection. 

When telephone cables were first used the 
largest contained less than 100 wires. Now 
the companies are using the 1,200-wire ca- 
ll lis. Insulation was formerly secured by 
filling the spaces between the wires with par- 
affin. When dry air was first used as an in- 
sulating medium the wires were wound with 
cotton. Then the cotton was discarded and 
paper adopted, because it would hold a larger 
amount of air than the cloth covering. 

Even in its present perfected form cable 
can not be extensively used in long-distance 
telephoning, for a mile of cable offers as 
much resistance as twenty-eight miles of un- 
inclosed wire. For this reason long-distance 
lines are carried around cities to avoid the 
conduit systems. Underground construction 
is so costly that it is necessarily confined al- 
most entirely to cities, but telephone cable 
is excellently adapted to the uses to which it 
i- put. and has been the means of greatly 
improving telephone service. — Saturday Ev- 
ening Post. 



Canadian Indians are increasing in num- 
bers, according to the latest census statistics. 
Births exceeded deaths in 1903 by 168 out 
of 102,233 Indians reported. 



— w 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A New Propeller. 

■ A formal trial was held recently on the 
Hudson River of a new propeller, the inven- 
tion of Fritz Grawert-Zellin, who says that 
his device will increase the speed of the 
fastest steamship by one-third. The pro- 
peller is designed ordinarily for ocean-going 
liners, and its promoters assert that the 
Deutschland, which has a westward record 
of 23.53 knots an hour and an unbeaten east- 
ward record of 23.15 knots, can increase her 
speed by the use of the improvement almost 
a knot an hour. The recent test was declared 
a success, and it is said that engineers of the 
fast steamers have given cordial indorsement 
to the new propeller. 

The ordinary propeller inclines rearward, 
and the pitch is such that the blades work 
continually in disturbed water. The blades 
of the Grawert-Zellin propeller are concave 
and inclined forward, and throw the water 
off in such a manner that the blades are al- 
ways working in solid water. Moreover, in 
the ordinary propeller the hub, to which the 
blades are attached, not only utilizes no 
power itself, bvit is responsible, from its for- 
mation, for a certain suction, which acts as 
a deterrent to the speed of the vessel. In the 
Grawert-Zellin propeller there is no hub to 
retard the speed, as the blades extend rear- 
ward over the hub and taper in a point of 
the axis of the propeller wheel, making the 
whole a working surface. The United States 
Patent Office has granted a broad claim to 
the inventor. The device will soon be tried 
abroad, and already a description and a 
model have been sent to Emperor William. 
— Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



Liner's Huge Kitchen. 

All travelers who set foot for the first time 
on a modern Atlantic liner are keenly inter- 
ested in the scientific appliances for navigat- 
ing and determining the position of the vessel 
and are surprised at the perfect appointments 
of the cabins and the public rooms for secur- 
ing their comfort throughout the voyage. But 
the average voyager scarcely gives a passing 
thought to another development of the up-to- 
date marine flyer that is as wonderful as any 
of these — the culinary department and the 
organization by which the liner's big family 
is provided daily with every variety of food 
served in every attractive form thousands of 
miles from the markets on which land estab- 
lishments depend for the daily renewal of 
their supplies. 

It is really a remarkable feat to supply 
food for 1,500 or 2,000 persons for a week 
or more — the big White Star liners running 
from Boston to the Mediterranean are a fort- 
night making their long voyages — and to 
serve it day after day in a manner to satisfy 
the varying tastes of passengers drawn from 
six or eight different countries. Such a thing 
was not even attempted on the old-fashioned 
steamers, where wretched coffee, bread and 
salt meats were the staple features of the 
table after the first two or three days out, 
and it has been made possible on the liners 
of to-day only by the great improvements in 
storage and preservation of perishable foods 
made by modern inventions and through the 
keen competition for the transatlantic pas- 



senger trade, which has left nothing untried 
to satisfy all the fastidious tastes of twen- 
tieth century travelers. 

It will be quite worth while for any house- 
wife who has difficulty in securing sufficient 
variety at her own table to secure permission 
to go through the ship's kitchens and to see 
how problems several hundredfold more diffi- 
cult than hers are met and solved. The main 
galley of an Atlantic liner, to give the 
seagoing kitchen its proper nautical name, 
reminds one less of a kitchen — even the 
kitchen of a thoroughly modern hotel — than 
of some extremely neat and well-ordered 
manufactory. It is indeed a big culinary 
workshop where specialization and strict dis- 
cipline are carried to the last degree and 
where mistakes are too costly to be allowed. 

One difference from the ordinary kitchen 
that will impress the observant housekeeper 
at once is the exceptional orderliness. Even 
the best of private cooks, when she is mon- 
arch of all she surveys and has no one to 
share her domain, will clutter about a good 
deal, and will leave the rolling pin sticky 
with dough till the cake has finished baking ; 
and in a big hotel there is plenty of elbow 
room, and it does not matter if utensils not 
in use are lying about. But on the ocean 
steamers, even on such big vessels as the 
20,000-ton Celtic and Cedric, space is valua- 
ble, and the shipboard rule of a place for 
everything and everything in -its place is rig- 
idly enforced. No surplus kitchen furniture 
is allowed to lie about; the minute a cook 
is done with an implement it is promptly 
taken to the washroom, cleaned and placed 
in its particular compartment or hung on its 
special hook. — Pilgrim. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 
Union of America) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone 1321 Monroe 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS 
CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH. CLEVELAND, O. 



Ashtabula Harbor, O 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



RELIEF STATIONS 

Manitowoc, Wi3. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior. Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



"We Don't Patronize. 



BRANCHES 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295 

TOLEDO, 1702 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762 
AGENCIES 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 138 Ninety-second Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago 
SANDUSKY, O U07 Adams Street 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, New York City; Kerbs. 
Wertheim & Schiffer, New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby, Milling Company, Min- 
neapolis, Minn.; Kelley Milling Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, la.; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rocester, N. Y.; Strawbridge 
& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner Bros., New 
York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt <tnd Collar Com- 
pany, Troy, N. Y. ; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, 
N. Y. ; Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James 
R. Kaiser, New York City. 

Shoes — Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thos. 
Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass.; Harney Bros., Lynn, 
Mass. 

Suspenders — Russell Manufacturing Company, Mid- 
dletown. Conn. 

Textile — Merrimac Manufacturing Company (print- 
ed goods), Lowell, Mass. 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica, N. Y. 

Woolens — Hartford Carpet Company, Thompson- 
ville, Conn.; J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Company, Chicago, 111. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Company, publishers, 
Hammond, Ind.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; 
Times, Los Angeles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS AND STONE. 

Pottery and Brick — J. B Owens Pottery Company, 
Zanesville, O. ; Northwestern Terra Cotta Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111.; Terre Haute Brick and Pipe 
Company, Terre Haute, Ind.; Evans & Howard 
Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick Company, St. Louis, 
Mo.; C. W. Stine Pottery Company, White Cot- 
tage, O.; Harbison-Walker Refractory Company, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Presscott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Davis Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, Dayton, O. ; Computing Scale Com- 
pany, Dayton, O.; Iver Johnson Arms Company, 
Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Company, Syr- 
acuse, N. Y.; Brown & Sharpe Tool Company, 
Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Company, 
Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass.; Hohmann & Maurer Manufacturing 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. ; Henry Disston & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.; American Hardware Company, 
New Britain, Conn. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Ni- 
agara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, O.; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; 
Payne Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln 
Iron Works, Rutland, Vt.; F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company, Rutland, Vt.; Art Metal Con- 
struction Company, Jamestown, N. Y. ; Erie City 
Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David Maydole Hammer 
Company, Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. D. Mesklr, Evansville. Ind. 

Stoves — Germsr Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 

Home" Stove, Ranges, and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa. 



Terre Haute 



STREET RAILWAYS. 
-Street Railway Company. 



WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooms aud Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, Davenport, la.; M. Goeller's Sons, Cir- 
cloville, O. 

Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Cooperage — Cincinnati Cooperage Company, Cincin- 
nati, O.; Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin; El- 
gin Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Williams 
Cooperage Company and Palmer Manufacturing 
Company, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; Ballard & Ballard 
Milling Company, Louisville, Ky. 

China — Wick China Company. Kittanning, Pa. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, O.; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta. 
Ga.; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. ; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, O. ; N. 
Drucker & Co. (trunks), Cincinnati, O.; St. Johns 
Table Company, St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids 
Furniture Manufacturing Association, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 

Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. Y. ; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, 
Cape May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Tex.; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; 
Huttig Sash and Door Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, More- 
house, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort Bragg, 
Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus 
Buggy and Harness Company, Columbus, O. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; 
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, O.; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, O. 

Pens — L. E. Waterman & Co., New York City. 
Paper Boxes — E. N. Row ell & Co., Batavia, N. Y.; 
J. N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Company, Norfolk, 

N. Y. 
Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, 

I I irt ford, Conn. 
Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
S i;;' I inrbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Cora- 

pany, Coshocton, O. 
Knllwavn — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



Shipping Notes. 

General-Secretary Sullivan, of the Marine 
Firemen, has just returned to New York 
from a trip to Baltimore. He reports bad 
conditions for firemen in that port, with no 
relief in sight. Henry Ahoden, a member of 
tbe Marine Firemen's Union, died a few 
•lays ago in the German Hospital in Phila- 
delphia, and was buried by the Union. 

Shipping is dull all around the Coast, and 
a large number of seamen arc idle in conse- 
quence. William H. Frazier, Secretary of 
the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, has re- 
ceived and accepted an invitation from the 
Boston branch of the Seamen's Friend So- 
ciety to address its members on the benefits 
derived by seamen from trade-unionism. At 
the last regular meeting of the Seamen's 
Union in Boston the delegates to the ninth 
annual convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union were instructed to secure from 
the convention, if possible, the appointmenl 
next Bpring of an organizer for St. John, 
X. 1!. 



The New York branch of the Cooks' and 
Stewards' Association has moved its offices 
from 21 Old Slip to 166 Christopher street, 
and requests the Jottbitax to duly note the 
change of location. The new quarters are 
much larger and more comfortable than the 
old ones, and also more convenient for the 
business of the Association. Mr. Henry 
Griffin, the Secretary, reports good progress, 
new members joining daily. Mr. Griffin is 
of the opinion that with one or two hustling 
organizers to assist him he would be able to 
build up a strong organization in New York, 
as tin- men among whom he work- are all 
well disposed toward the movement. 



Fag' Ends. 

Many "vested rights'' are simply legalized 
wrongs. 



Dare to be a man at all times, and every 
right that is due you will be conceded. 



The only success worth while is that which 
springs from natural ability joined to honest 
endeavor. 



The pride that keeps a man from doing 
shabby things is not the pride that "goeth 
before a fall." 



"Graft" will flourish so long as men look 
up to a millionaire thief and down upon an 
honest dav-laborer. 



The man who is cruel to his horse is never 
a good citizen. By the same token he has in 
him the makings of a first-class bucko mate. 



A new broom sweeps clean ; but the kind of 
man the public and labor unions need in 
office is the man who will discharge his du- 
ties as faithfully on the last day of his term 
as he did on the first day. There is no 
test of a man's probity and character than 
that. 



A sets a trap. B gets caught in it. I! 
makes a holler. A says B is over twenty-one 



years of age and ought to have known hitter. 
The world says A is a smart business man 
and B a duffer for getting caught. Every 
boy in the land is taught to look up to A 
and emulate his business acumen. There, 
in a nutshell, is the whole philosophy of the 
modern trend of thought. Be smart and put 
money in your purse; honestly if you can, 
but be smart, anyhow! 



I E there is anything more nauseating than 
the cheap claptrap with which workingmen 
are beguiled by their "friends" at the politi- 
cal court, it is the cant and hypocritical snuf- 
lie of "commercial respectability," the kind 
which »ives thousands to foreign missions 
and rakes in millions in profits from the sale 
of adulterated foods, poisonous drugs, shod- 
dy clothing, scrap-iron life-preservers (?) 
and the thousand and one unholy devices 
whereby greed tills its maw while scattering 
misery, disease and death broadcast through 
the land. One of the greatest needs of the 
time is ;, bona-fide "Society for the Preven- 
tion of Crime under the cover of Law and 
Respectability." 



What "Open Shop" Means. 



The "Open Shop" crusade by no means is 
simply striving to ••confine the organization 
of the workers to its present limit." It g i - 
much further. It is, by means both bold and 
insidious, aiming at disrupting unionism. 

No other anti-Union body ever went so far, 
with so much power for evil. Support to 
tins crusade is evident in its large expendi- 
ture of money and m its semi-secrel organiza- 
tion, embracing many of the chief cities of 
the country. Its sweeping plans are reveal- 
ing themselves in the attacks made on union- 
ism through the Parryite press and Parryite 
pamphleteering, and in the selection of 
unions for attacks where results would per- 
mit the "Open Slap" advocates to claim vic- 
tories. The present onslaught on unionism 
does not result from the old form of the 
struggle against the spread of labor organiza- 
tion. It comes from a combination superior 
to any other ever known in America. For 
the time being at least this combination has 
attracted greater managing power and a 
greater degree of public sympathy and the 
recognition of more powerful names, as in 
the case of President Eliot, of Harvard, than 
has any previous opposition to unionism. It 
has as salient features talking delegates, com- 
bine lawyer-, trade labor bureaus and travel- 
bag organizations of strike breakers. 

The first thing necessary for the unions 
not yet attacked is to have a clear perception 
of what the "Open Shop" crusade is attempt- 
ing, and of th^ aid i: is obtaining in quarters 
unsuspected by labor leaders generally, and 
of what is to befall the unionists in any trade 
in which the "Open Shop" really becomes 
an established fad. — Weekly Bulletin of the 
Clothing Trades. 



Employes in Japanese cotton factories get 

only 8 to 11 cent- for a day's work of eleven 
to twelve hours. The work, however, is much 

less strenuous than in this country, and much 
time is wasted in loafing, talking, laughing 
and drinking tea. 



International Seamen's Union ot America. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 
WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BANGOR. ME., 44 Union St. 
PORTLAND. ME., 377A Fore St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I.. 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 37 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 6S West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Southeast corner Second 
and Lombard Sts. 

BALTIMORE, MD., 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, VA., 52 Campbells Wharf. 
NEW BEDFORD. MASS.. 7 South Water St. 
Ml UULE, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 
Branches: 

NEW YORK CITY, 51-52 South St. 
BOSTON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 1800 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA., corner Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE. ALA., 104 South Commerce St. 
GALVESTON. TEX.. 20 Strand St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., 223 Commercial St. 

Branch: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 166 Christopher Si. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branches: 
GLOUCESTER, MASS.. 141% Main St. 
BROOKLYN, X. Y., 129 Twenty-third St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL., N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

CHICAGO, ILL, 121-123 North Desplainos St. 
Branches: 

MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 

SUTABULA HARBOR, O.. 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., l. r >2 Main St. 
DETROIT, MICH., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, WIS.. 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY. MICH., 919 North Water St. 
RACINE. WIS., 923 Forest St. 
MANITOWOC. WIS.. 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE, PA., 107 Third St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL., 138 Ninety-second Bt 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 

GHEUBAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St. 
Branches: 

DETROIT. MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TOXAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
EAY CITY. MICH., 919 Water St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, WASH., 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE. WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND. WASH., 88% Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, OR., 23 No'th Front St. 
EUREKA. CAD., P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. I., P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquurters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC. 

Hendquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 

Branches : 
SEATTLE, W r ASH., Colman Dock, Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 

Branch : 
SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION 

Headquarters, Astoria, Or. 

H. M. LORNTSEN, Secretary. 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room is open at all times to Members 

of the Sailors' Union. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 

^TRADE S gjurojj COUNCIL ^ 



Abbott, P. H., 314-316 Battery. 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mis- 
sion. 
American Printing House, 1067 Market. 
Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 
Barry, James H., The Star Press, 429 

Montgomery. 
Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 
Ben Franklin Press. 123 Seventh. 
Benson & Liss, 776 Bryant. 
Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 
Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 
Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., 321 Cali- 
fornia. 
Brunt, W. N., 102-104 Second. 
Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 
California Printing Co., 41-43 Eighth. 
Church Press, 23 Davis. 
Commercial Publishing Co., S. E. cor. 

First and Mission. 
Cook, The Morton L., Second and Minna. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 
Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 
Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento 1 . 
Dettmar, C. H., 529 California. 
Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 
Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 
Fording & Payne, 22 Clay. 
Francis-Valentine Co., 103-109 Union 

Square. 
Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 
Galloway Publishing Co., cor. Mission 

and Second. 
Gllmartin Publishing Co., The, 1019 

Market. 
Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 
Golden West Press, 527 Mission. 
Gould, W. H., 1019 Market. 
Hancock Bros.. 73 Third. 
Harvey, John D., 246 Sutter. 
Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 
Hiester, Wm. A., City Hall Square. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 
Hinton Printing Co., 516 Commercial. 
Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 
Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 
Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 
Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 
Lacaze, I/., 519 California. 
Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 
Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 
Leader. The, 532 Commercial. 
Leidecker, C. Co., 156 New Montgomery. 
Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 
Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 
Levingston, L.. 540 Clay. 
Lynch, James T.. 514 Kearny. 
Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 
Majestic Press. The, 1566 Market. 
McCracken Printing Co.. 509 Kearny. 
Meyerfeld. Albert M.. 414 Pine. 
Meyer Printing Co., 638 Mission. 
Mission Free Press, The, 2401 Mission. 
Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 
Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 
Munk, R., 809 Mission. 
Murdock, C. A. & Co.. 532 Clay. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 
Pacific Heights Printery, 2438 Sacra- 
mento. 
Partridge, John. 306 California. 
Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 
Phelan, F. M., 1010 Buchanan. 
Phillips, Smyth & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 
Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 

of Justice. 
Polyglott Press, 723 Montgomery. 
Roesch. Louis Co., 321-325 Sansome. 
Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 
Samuel, Wm., 411 % California. 
San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 

407 Sansome. 
Shanley, J. M., 414 Clay. 
Spaulding, Geo. & Co.. 414 Clay. 
Springer & Co.. 240 Ellis. 
Standard Printing Co., 518 Clay. 
Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 
Sterett, W. I. Co., 933 Market. 
Sterling Press, 213 Stevenson. 
Steutzel & Co., 109 California. 
Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 
Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square Ave. 
Town Talk Printing Co., cor. Mission 

and Second. 
Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 
Upton Bros.. 17 Fremont. 
Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 
Wahl & Drake, 850 Market. 
Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 
Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 
Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 
Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 
Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 
Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 
Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 
Bookbinders. 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Brown & Power, 508 Clay. 
Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First 
Kitchen, John Jr. Co., 510-514 Commer- 
cial. 
Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 
McGeeney, Wm. H., 33 Stevenson. 
Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 
Malloye. F., 422 Sacramento. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 
Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 
Whelan, Richard I. & Co.. 42 Steuart. 

Lithographers and Printers. 
Britton & Rey, 525 Commercial. 
Galloway Lithographing Co., 410 ban- 
some. ._ _ 
Roesch Co., Louis, 321-325 Sansome. 
Photo-EngTavers and Etchers. 
Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Mont- 
gomery, near Mission. 
Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay 
California Engraving Co., 506 Mission. 
Lewis & Newberry Co., 645 Market. 
McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 
Sierra Eneraving Co., 324 Grant Ave. 
Sunset Enlravinl Co.', 108 Union Square 

Urdion Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 

Yoseniite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotype™. 

American Press Association, 207 Sacra- 

Hoffschnelder Bros., 412 Commercial. 
Martin & Co., 608 Clay. 



Twenty =five 



25 


Expert Shoe Fitters. 


25 


Union Men. 


25 


Partners 


25 


Men who share the profits of their 
industry. 


25 


Shoe Men to advance the interests of 
Union Stamp Shoes. 



Do We Deserve Your Patronage? 




Phelan Building, 812-814 Market Street, San Francisco. 
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 



World's WorKers. 



HKI 



^-5$-*-*-^*-*~*^'35^^^t$^^^t$^^t^5^$^^^^^ 




$1 a week $1 

Gold Watch or Diamond 

UINITBD STATES 

WATCH CLUB 



* 



640 MARKET ST., ROOM 3 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager. 



Union Boot & Shoe Store 

United Workingmen -A. 
Co-Operative Company's VM§ 
Shoes Constantly on Hand ' **"**■ 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

C. LESTER, 12 Steuart St. 



44 EAST STREET 

Room 6— Phone Bush 341 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

ALTERING AND REPAIRING 



J. M. RICHARDS, Prop. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light blue) 
appears on the box frorrrwhichjyou 
are served. 



Issued by AutDontyof Uie Cigar Mai-.ers International Union of Amend 

Union-made Cigars. 

Wti& <5fltifirt. Th«».<^a»rB^i»ua»taiii..»i««»*»"K^»™™* 

\¥* *«UBO>0f 'Ht OGAfl lUKEO'llfTtWUITlMUl UHBN « Awna. <" "W««W» 0WM MWMM 
.W9 twicfmwoftVMIiMiii/ntllniimiiiiltUimuiiNlUMtOfTXfaurr TbtittanmreauMai 
ttaaCiajntsiiisnduntmnaMtfKMMiM 

» IM ut»i olfta pouted jatnuq to'— 



' <UI Urfn»)HHf uoon I 



V C.M..I.T7 °f / 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

Smoke Union -Made Cigars that Bear the 
Above Label 



The Monogram Cigar Store 

All kinds of Union-made Cigars, Cigar- 
ettes and Tobacco. 

150 EAST STREET, COR. HOWARD. 

GUS HOLMGREN, Proprietor. 
Agent for the Steam Laundry. 



The Castle Cigar Store 

250 East Street, near Folnom, 

KEEPS THE 

BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS AND TO- 
BACCOS. 

Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
G. H. PALMER, Proprietor. 



The headquarters of the International 
Transport Workers' Federation have 
been transferred from England to Ger- 
many. 

The bonus paid on white-grown sugar 
cane at Mackay, Queensland, during 
■inly, amounted to £44 17s 9d, and 
£2,375 14s 5d in August. 

The New Zealand Railway Department 
is offering prizes of £15, £10 and £5 to 
permanent way men for the best kept 
length of line in each district. 

The Sydney (Australia) Professional 
Musicians' Union has voted £20 to be 
spent in purchasing a new library. It 
was decided to summon all members over 
10s in arrears of dues. 

The Butchers' Shop Employes' Union, 
of Sydney, Australia, has decided to pro- 
ceed against nine employers for breaches 
of the working conditions. It was also 
decided to affiliate with the Labor Coun- 
cil. 

The South Australian Locomotive En- 
ginemen, Firemen and Cleaners' Associa- 
tion reports a decrease in the number 
nf members good on the books during the 
past twelve months, but the funds have 
increased considerably. 

The unemployed appear to be increas- 
ing in West Australia. During the 
month of August the number of new 
registrations at the Government Labor 
Bureaus of Perth, Fremantle and Kal- 
goorlie amounted to 878. 

The Sydney (Australia) Eight-Hour 
Committee has decided to hand over 25 
per cent of t he profits of the Eight-Hour 
Demonstration and Art Union toward 
the establishment of a library and bu- 
reau of industrial statistics at the 
Trades Hall. 

In the New Zealand Arbitration Court 
recently a gold mining company, charged 
with paying five carpenters less than the 
minimum rate of wages, was in each 
case fined £5 and £2 2s costs, also wit- 
ness and other expenses, and ordered to 
pay up the back wages to four of the men. 
1 1 is said that many thousands of 
workmen in Hamburg, Germany, are ab- 
staining from drinking beer because of 
a strike of 2,000 brewery hands, thus 
boycotting more than twenty-three brew- 
eries. Three of the breweries have given 
in to the strikers and granted their de- 
mands. 

The members of the Northern Miners' 
Federation, of New South Wales, Aus- 
tralia, have rejected the proposed draft 
agreement framed by employers' and 
employes' delegates, and recommended 
by the union officials. The men prefer- 
red to have the case decided by the Ar- 
bitration Court. 

The recent Brisbane (Queensland) 
Eight-Hour demonstration and Art 
Union realized a profit of about £130. 

A large number of the unemployed at 
Bundaberg, Queensland, have been given 
free railway passes to various parts of 
the State with the object of assisting 
then to obtain work. Others were sent 
to the North Coast Railway to take on 
I ic cutting. 

Miss Mary McArthur, Secretary of the 
Women's Trade Union League, Eng., is 
doing some splendid organizing work 
among the London female workers, and 
has successfully conducted strikes af- 
fecting the printing trade girls, the tele- 
phone girls, and the blacking-pot fillers. 
She states that the Lancashire factory 
hands have the finest women's union in 
the world, 80,000 strong. 

Most of the niiiicowners in the New- 
castle district, New South Wales, have 
given notice of their intention to reduce 
the selling price of coal from 10s to 9s 
per ton. As this means a reduction of 
Id per ton in the hewing rate, the min- 
ers have decided to take legal advice, 
with the object of moving the Arbitra- 
tion Court to restrain the proprietors 
from enforcing the reduction. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



General News. 



Admiral Dewey has offered to 
mand the combined fleets and direct the 
winter maneuvers in the Caribbean Sea. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters e Used for six months 

and kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not called 
for at the expiration of one year letters 
will be returned to the Postoffice. 



A resolution disapproving of reciproc 

ity with Canada was adopted by the 
Vermont House on October 20 without 
opposition. 

The Hague Peace Tribunal will meet 
on November 19 to settle a dispui 
salting from Japan's tax on property in 
foreign concessions. 

The enforcement of the Chinese Foreign 
Trademark Registration Act, which was 
to have gone into oITeet on October 23. 
has been indefinitely postponed. 

The Prince Bishop of Aseoli has a 
J. Pierpont Morgan to return the stolen 
Cope, and has also requested the Pope 
to use influence to obtain its return to 
the cathedral. 

The Infanta Maria de las Mercedes, 
Princess of the Asturias, sister of King 
Alfonso and wife of Prince Char] 
Bourbon, who gave birth to a daughter 
at Madrid, Spain, on October 1G, died on 
the following day. 

The total registration of voter- lor the 
island of Oahu, T. H., this year i- 6,631, 
or 2o. r > more than two years ago. There 
i- considerable falling off in the number 

of whites registered, while the native 
and Portuguese vote will be larger. 

The British Army Council has issued 
an important order, under which, instead 
of enlisting three years with the colors 
and nine in the reserves, infantry of the 
line will in the future enlist for nine 
years with the colors and three in re- 
serves, thus abolishing the short service 
system. 

The people of Alsace-Lorraine have ; 
it is said, given up hope of ever rejoin- 
ing France and have presented a unani- 
mous petition of the provincial councils 
to the Imperial Chancellor, asking for 
legislative action to raise the conquered 
province into Federal States, with indc- 
pendenl legislatures, based on manhood 
suffrage, 

Papers were Bled with the New Jersey 

Secretary (if Stat October 20, pro- 
viding for the carrying out of the plan 
of merger of the American Tobacco Com 
pany, the Consolidated Tobacco Com- 
pany, and the Continental Tobacco Com 
pany. The consolidated companies an 
to be known as the American Tobacco 
Company, with an authorized capitaliza- 
tion of .$180,000,000. 

Bya majority of three to one t lie Court 
Of Sessions at Edinburgh, Scotland, 
on October -ll ordered that, the recent 
judgment of the BoUSe of Lords, placing 
in the hands of the twenty-four Free 

Church ministers, who opposed the 
union of the Free Church of Scotland 

with the United Presbyterian Church, 
the whole of the property of the Free 
Church, valued at. about $55,000,000, be 
applied immediately. 

\ dispatch from Cape Town, S. A., to 
the London Times say.-,: In respo 
a deputation from the building trades, 

complaining of the competition of 

lean girders and in American and 
ish joinery. Treasurer Walton said the 
Government was already 
with a view to the revision of the Cus- 
toms' convention, and admitted that 
events pointed toward some measures of 
protection in all of the South African 
colonies. 

on August 27th last a law abolishing 

Catholic convent- was passed b 

Lgrese of Ecuador, and this law is 
being pui into effect. The nuns are 
given the option of retiring to public 
hospitals, where they will be cared for 
:1 , ,1,,. expense of the cities and towns, 
or of leaving the country. In thi 
that they decide to leave the country 
they will receive an indemnity of $2,100 
;„ gold each. The convents and other 
pmpcty owiiod by the Catholi 

being confiscated by the Government. 



Aagard. A. M. 
bur 
Adams, l lavid I. 

i 1 1 
Adolf, John 
Agerup. Rich. 
Ahlquist. Albert 

Albr< i 
Alexis, Hakan 

Allan, John 
Amundsen, M. 
Amundsen, Pet 
Amundson, A If. 
Andersen- 1 

rsen-889 
Andersen-912 
Andersen-926 
Andersen, Adolf 
iVndersen, Andrew 



Anderson-58 
■.- on- 991 
9on-1011 
on-1218 
Anderson, Carl Alf 
son, Carl J. 
Erall 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson, Sven 
An<lersson-139 
Andersson-1082 
-son-1184 
son, A. W. 
Andersson, C. S. 
Andcrsson. Eskil 
ion, <;nst 
Andersson, Hjalmar 
Antonsen, Martin 
Apps. Alf 
Arnes-en, Ragnvald 



Andersen, Bernhard Arnold. Andrew 



Andersen, B, HJ 
Andersi n, l [enrj 
Andersen. ( He 
Baker, C. P. 
Baker, John 
Barber. A. 
Basberg, Elans n 
Bastion. W. 
Bauer, K. O. 
Bauer, Ludv. 

6, Paul R. 

ler, Joseph 

n-143 
-1210 
! olm. Bdv. 
rd, S. 
Bernert, Fred 
Birkrem, < ilaus 
Blankenfeld, O. 
Blinne, Karl 
Cainan, Geo. 
('arisen, K.-699 
('arisen, John L. 
V. 

Carlsson, Axel G 
Carlsson, John 
Carlsson, W. S. 
Caroe. Arthur 
Christensen, E. 
Christens©] 



Arvesen, Ami 

Asmussen, M. C. 
Austrand, ('has. 

I .arson 
BOCk, ("has. 
I lorlnl, Lewis 
Bottcher, J. G. C. 
ax. Leon 

hi, Carl A. 

Brakemann, K. 
Brandters, J. 

Brandt, Fred 
Braun, F.-1195 
Bredesen. Edwin 
Brillowsky, N. 
Brose, R. 
Brown, E. 
t tut hler, Krist. 
Buttli r, Viktor A. 
Byerllng, C. a. 
Christensen. O. M. 
Christians. n-aUl 
Christiansen. Carl 
: 8, W. W. 
. Thomas 
ntsson, A. 
Clough, H. R. 
>n, Louis 
Connor, John J. 
Connor, Wm. 
Cooper. Hans 



V llMMCLiacll. M. t-J. *_.w--f^.i, aa...... 

Christensen, Henrik Cutmann, A. R 
Christensen. J. R 



Dabel, W. G. 
Dahl. John M. 
Dahlgren, Albin 
Dahlgren, Karl 
Daniel. J. — (M.) 
Danielsson, Ernst 
De Haan, G. A. 
Bkhart, W. 
Ekstrom. J. P. 
Ellison. Ed N. 
Els, John 
Emanuelsen, C. 
- .in. John 
{• jeldstad, Olai 
E'orst r 

Foster, Frank 
Fox. Thomas 

lecke. E. 

I h Mill",. K.'i rl 

Gasman, Geo. A. 
Gilbert. Wm. S. 
ill. i']..".'. 1 1. 
Gohrlng, Wm. 
Gossel, i 

Grandahl, Hjalmar 
l iaa rssen, J. 

i man. H. 
Hagstrom- l 2E 5 
Hakala, Lennart 
t [akansson, G. 
Halvorsen, H. 

irsen, Morten 
i Ben, Wm. 
Hammarin, A. E. 
Hansen-1162 
Hansen, Andrew 
Hansen, Geo. -1410 
Hansen, Hans 

a, I I a VIS P. 

ii m len, l lans R. 

I [a risen, 1 1. H. 

Hansen. Maurius 

llans.n. Nokhart MJlorn, Krist 



Dexter, Geo. S. 
] ilener, Aiik 
Dodgson, A. H. 
Doense, J. 
Donner, Matt 
Dyck, Max 

Enbom, Wm. 
Engell, Emil 
Erlksen-512 
Erlkson, E.-38 
Evald, Ernst 
Evensen. Einar O. 
Poyn, Sam 

askovic, Ed 
French, J. A. 

Gray, J. K. 
Grey, E. J. 
Grondahl, Y. 
Grunboek, Job. 
Gulbransen. Nils 

li rs en, Th. 
Gunlach, John 

Henriksen. A. G. 
Henriksen. Krist 
Herb old. W. 
• 

Herman. Alex 
Hesselberg, K. 
Hill-1148 
Hinner. Paul 
1 1 j.lmer. W. 

Y. J. 
H..1. son. Thomas 
i [oheisel, ( 'has. 
Holmes, Chris 
Holmes, Martin 
i [olm, Oscar 
Holtti, John 
HornberK-1383 



..n, Hilmer 

\\'m.-1179 
Hazel. W. 

neus-1360 
Hell, A. -1012 

lid. Julius 

in, C. P. 
Jakobsen, N. C. 
Jankeri. Oskar 
Janhunen, W. 
en, Weert 
son-1117 
aon-1234 
.lansson. John 
ai. !;. A. 
i - 7 G 9 
Jensen, Anders C. 
i. Aug. Adolf 

!. F. 
u. H.-8G9 

Jensen, 1 1. F. 

. Rasmus 

i -sT 1 

Jchai 

i 080 
1216 

I 

Johansen, F. C. 

.ii. 1 1. K. 
Kaehn 

k , C. 
K'arlsen, John L 

a-S63 
son, G. J. 
Karvonen, EC. ' S. 
Kask. John 
Kepmka. K. 
Kihl, Harry 
Klausen. Carl J. 
Klemettlla, & 
Klin;-; 

John 

I .angvardt, N. 

Larkin. Sam 

a-643 
Larsen 

n-950 
n, Anton 
B, C.-824 



Larsen, John L. 
Larsen, N. 
Larsson-933 
Lau, Gust. 

ty, R. C. L. 
Leineweber, J. 
Lcino, Gust. 
Madison, David 
Madsen-667 
Madsen-952 
Magnusson, Karl 
Mahoney, F. E. 
Mahoney, Frank 
Malmkvist, Carl 
Mannion. James 
Martelock, Chas. 
Materre, Alex 
Mathison, J. M. 
Mathisen. T. L. 
Mathsen, Olaf 
Mattejat, W. 
Mattsson, A. M. 
Mavor-1371 
Neilsen, M. P. 
Nelson, T. H. 
NIchlasen, N. C. 
X. lson-69S 
Nielsen-859 
Nielsen, Jens A. 
Nielsen. Niels C. 
Nielsen, Ole 
Nielsen. W. 

n-501 

Oberg, Herbert 
Oberhauser. J. 
ilius 
Olsen-206 

-515 
n-699 

.-703 

i-727 
Olsen, Carl J. 
( ilsen. Edward 

I lans 
1'alsen, Torwald 
l apke, l tarry 
Passon, Bruno 
Peabody, Frank 
Pedersen, Chr. 
Pedersen, K. 
Pedersen, Ole 
Pederson, Louis 
Perry. Ben 
Petersen-659 
Petersen-954 
Tormod 
Ranta, Hjalmar 
Rasmusen. Alb. 
Fa.smussen-690 
Rasmussen, Geo 
Reinson. E. 
Riches, AK.-663 
Rockwell-621 

Salhareasen. Jorgen Smith. Valdemar 
Samuelson, W. L. Smith. W. 



Hobs, John 
Houston. Rob 
y. James 

, Wiiiiam 

-n-74 
Johansen, ( innner 
.: , 1 1 .- 1 asen, John P. 

sen, T. P. 
Johansson-880 

son-1095 
Johansson-1396 
Joha osson, A. 
Johansson. Aug. 
Johansson. Carl 
. I . . h a l "-'.. 1 1 , I I ,i a 1 

K . w. 
Johnsen-983 
Johnson-588 

o. 1-1420 
,l..hn on ' ' 1 1 a s 
Johnson. Ed. F. E. 
son. J. E., 

on. W. J. 
Johnson. Wm. 
ild, Theo. 
Theo. 
iph, E. S. 
Jungjohan, J. 
Knoph, J. ' dsi n 
K'nudsen, Fred 
Knutsson, O. H. 
Knutson, Olaf A. 
Krieger, A 
Krlstensen, H. 

nsen, O. M. 
Kristiansen, T. O. 
Kristoffersen-fil4 

Kristoffersen, K. H. 
Krohnert, Alb. 

Lelthoff, Carl 
Leelli 

Lewin, Chas. 
Lie. Carl-1042 
Likelts, Christ 
Lillle. Fred 
Llndstrom, G. A. 
Lite. Knot 
Lockwood, Chas. 
berg, F. Magnus 
in Werner 



Lorentzen-990 
Lorenz, O. 
Luden, Albin 
Ludolph, H. 
Lund, Chas. 
Lundgren, C. 
Lundin, Chas. 
McCarthy. Peter 
McCombs. F. S. 
McFadden, Wm. 
McGarrick, John 
McGrath, Frank 
Meinseth, Albert 
Menthen, Otto 
Mersman, A. 
Michael. Walter 
Morre, B. F. 
Morrissey, Jas. 
Morris, Wm. T. 
Mortensen, Chr. 
Mullen, Leo L. 
Muller, R. 
Munson. Michael 
Nllsen-609 
Nilscn-614 
Nilssen-737 
Nllsson-698 
Noack, Hans 
Nor. ('has. 
Nordblom, B. G. 
Nvmalm. Felix 
Nyroos-769 

Olsen, Terje 
Olsin. Olaf S. 
Olson-G30 
Olson, Emil M. 
Olson, Olof 
Olsson-597 
Olsson-812 
olsson-824 
i immundsen, O. 
Osterberg, Carl 
Osterberg. Frithjof 
Petersen, Bertel 
Petersen. Viktor 
1 a tterson, K, J. 
Fetterson. Knut 
Pettersson-725 
Pettersson-844 
Phair, Wm. 
Pick. R. O. W. 
Piedvache, E. 
Pollack, Paul 

Rohl, Werner 
Rolke, Geo. 
Rollo, R. 
Rosan, Oscar 

ack, Paul 
Rosenblad, A. 
Ruellans. Jules 
Rustad, Sverre 



Sandav, Frank 
Sandberg-938 
Schaefer, T. 
Schwenke, Karl 
Serrero, Louis 
Setterberg, K. 
Shubert, Otto 
Sickemeyer, W. 
Silloots, Tonnies 
Silva. Joe H. 
Simonsen-1147 
Simonsen. Tom 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smith. Sam J. 
Talbert. Frank 
Thiele. A. 
Thomas, Jos. 
Thoren. Gust 
Thorn. Arvid 
Udby. Harold 
Udd, John-885 
Uken. H. 

Van der Lohen. F. 
Van Gricken, Fred 
Van Mcelcn, Ph. 
Vassallo, P. 
Viereck, Heinrich 
Vincent, Jos. 
Wagner, J. 
Wahlstrom. A. A. 
Walter, E. 
Walters, Harry 
Warren, Frank 
Warren, W. A. 
Watson. J. F. 
Weibust, John 
W'ehlcman. Frank 
Weiden. Ed 
Welsh. John 
Younger, A. J. 
Zachrisen, J. M. 



Boderman. Elis 
Sommer, Franz 
Sorensen, T. M. 
Stephan — 1455 
Sterne. Geo. 
St. James, Alfred 
Stockman. L. 
Ptoschau, Johan 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Sundholm. Erik 
Svendsen. Christ 
Svendsen, Otto 
Svensson, Karl O. 

Thorssen, Fred 
Toick. Matt 
Tompson. Loui 
Tulin. Fritz 
Tvedt, H. S. 
Ulright. T. 
Unterein, F. 

Vogel, A. 
Void, O. P. 
Von Asperen. W. 
Von Kleist, H. 
Vuclch. V. 

Wiebke, Ernst 
Wihtol. Ernest 
Wiik. H. 
Wikman-677 
Wilhelmsen, Chas. 
Will, Clem 
Wilmont. Frank 
Wilson. Robert 
Wirnhof. P. 
Wright. W. B. 

Zimmerman. F. 
Zerberg, Geo. 



SIOATTI. 

Absalomsen, O. M. 

Albers. ( e ... 
,' lexan.hr. S. 
Amundsen, P. 
Andersen. A. F. 
Andersen. B. H.-871 
Andersen, Fred H. 
Andersen. Jai ob 
Andersen. L. T. 
Anderson. G. F. A. 
Anderson, J. 
Anderson. Olaf-732 
a n der son, Wm. 

A PBS, A I I red 

I as, 'I'll I--' 
Aiilnten, M.-914 
i laberg, L. L. 
Bi clew Ith, W. N. 

I '. rg, Tims. A. 
I. R. 

:, H. 

iurg, Gustaf 

i h, M. 
Brurim. A. 
Cameron Ft. 

( 'aiirenus. W. 
( 'orison. L. P. 

( 'in istensen 

< hrist euseii. G. I.. 
( 'hrisl eiisen. N 
Christoftersen.Han 

Clausen. C. J. 

Craig, E. 

i lahlgren, C. J. 

Daly, J. 

o.I. 

1 lyk, C. J. Van 
Eriksen, Antony 
Eriksen, Fred 
i'. lix. L. 

i rom. H. 
I Ij mi. P. 
I'oi si rim, C. 

r. J. 
i redriksen, L. 
in. Geo. 
0W, I. 

a, M. 
Gonza Ii 

;er. J. 
i land, H. 
Gregor. Edvin 



E, W VS11. 

Gronnestad. H. 
Gronlund. O. 
Cuke. Join 
Haglund. Cs rl 
Hartley, J 

Hansen. Alfred, A. G 
Hansen. Bernhard 
l ii ns. n. Ed I ard 
Hansen. Henry 
Hansen. 11. E. 

a. K. 

r, P. 
Hekkola. S. 
Hf 11m. m, (arl 
] lenriksen. Elert 

I [enrlksen, Hart uch 
Hermansen, F. 

Hermansen, I 
Herseley, R. S. 
Hilarien, C. 

I I of man, F. 

I lokcnsen. C. 
l [oving, B. A. 
Huhlev. Howard 
Hull. W 
Jacobaen, J. A. -779 

a. J. 

a, Julius 

i en, S. G. 
s Johansen, J.- 1 i - s 

Joha asen, J. S. 
Johansen. L.-1210 
Johansen. S. -1205 
John: en, tvar 

has. 
Jollnit. W. 
li. O. 
Johansen, Carl L. 
Johannesen, .T.-1119 
Johnson, C. A. 

m, II jalmar 
in, James 
on. John 
i sen, J. M. 
en, F. W. 
Karlson, Gustaf 
Karlson, Iv.ir 
Karlson K. E.-903 

K el 3. 

Keiiy. Patrick 



Pendville. N. 

sen, H. A. 
Peterso 
i 'etersi 

I i 1 lersen. E. 

r, H. 
I roll, H. 

fie, R. 
Proctor. Geo. 
Rasmussen, M. 
Rasmussen, 
];• ay. S. 
Riordan, P. 
Robinscn, J. 
Robinson, W. 
ae, J. T. 
Geo. 
. aahlgard, T. 
Sal berg, O. 
Salvesen, S. 
Sandberg. A. 
Scars bosia, M 
Schoien, J. 
Schwartskopf, P. 

S"la .eh :' 

tsen. Geo. 
Sjoberg. G. 
Smith. C. A. V. 
Br Ith, E. 
Smith. Wm. 

Soderlund, a. 
Boderma n, J. M. 

Sorensen. i 
Borensen, E.-1 149 
Sovik, M. 
tising, W. 

W. H.-1533 
Sirnm. A. 
Strom, J. G. 
Swanson, John 
Swensen, L. 
Swensen, T. 
Thayfon, John 
Tlmi'i 

Thompsen. T. 
Thomsen, Bid 
Thorsen, M. 
1 i orsen, Theo. 
Void. O. P. 
Wahrunberg, O. 

\\ r al! 

Warren, Wm. 

Weitunpr, H. 
W'eiiuerlund, A. 
Welzel, K. 
Wlch, W. 
Wickblad, O. 
Wie. A. 

Wiedner, K. 

Will. Geo. 
\\'i Ison, Albert 
Wilson, Thos. 
Zelinski, P. 



I^illstrom, B. 
Klinker, J. 
Kloperstrom. W. 
Kongsvald, R. 
Kopplin, Robert 
Krallman. A. 
Lambuarra, M. 
Larsen, Axel 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larsen. S. 
Lauren, J. O. 
Lewsen. L.-1008 
Lichner, J. 
Lie, J. L. 
land. John 
Lindquist, Karl 
Llndstrom, A. J. 
Llndstrom, Olaf 

Li Vanos. M. 

Lohlin, John 
Lorenz, J. O. 
Loven, K. 
Lundquist, John 
Mi rHon.ald. N. 
Magnuset), Gus 
Marin, A. 
.Marti nsen. K. 

Mattson, a. H. 
Matt son, F. 
Mattson. M. 
Mayerkanys, w. 
T. R. 

McDonald. J. 
McLeod, J. L. 
Mi dder, H. W. 
Mikkelsen, 1 1 as 

Mulligan, J. 
Murk. T. 

Nicklasen, TT 
Nicklasen, N. 
Nilsen. C. B. 
C. M. 
Nilsen, H. M. 
Nlssen, Eakeld 
( (hlsen, G. F. 

I llapen, M.-S.li'l 

i, B. 
(ilsen. Carl J. 
i ilsen, E. 

i ilsen. E. M. 

n, Lorentz 
i dsen, Ludvig 
Olsen, O. H. 

Olsen. Oscar 
Olsen, P. F. 
olsen. P. O. 
Olsen, R. 
Olsen, Sam 
Paulson, C. 
Paulson, Edvin 
I '.arson, J. 
Pedersen. H, P. 
rson, La rs 
pchrsing. H. 
Pendergast, E. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Akselsen. Johan Johanson. Natanial 



Akerblum. Charles 
Allen, John 
Amelsen. Johan 
Amnell, Albert 
Andersen-735 
Anderson-907 
Andersen-912 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen. Edvard 
Andersen, Ingbret 

A. 
Andersen, Joseph 
Andersen, Salve 

Anderson, A. B. -1119 Karlson. J. A 
Anderson, A. J. Karlson-3SS 

Anderson, Alfred Karlsson, Gustaf 
Anderson, A. G.-549 Ernst 
Anderson, Bertinius Karlsson. John 



Johansson, Carl- 

l 5 1 9 
Johansson. Carl L 
Johndahl, Harry 
Johnsen. Carl-588 
Johnson-12Sl 
Johnson. Edward 
Johnson. Edward A. 
Johnson. Michael 
Johnson. P. 
Johnston. O. W. 
Johnson. Chas. 
son, P. J. 



G. 

Anderson, F.-671 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Martin 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, S. 
Anderssen-853 
Armale, Frans 
Arvidsen, Axel M. 
Baker, John 
Bixby, E. 
Blomquist, H. 
Bock, Charles 
Bogan. Patrick 
Bohman, Eric 
Boose, Paul-606 
Boren, William 
Bortram. Wm. 

(package) 
Brouford. Charles 
Bryndal. Henry 
Caramatic, Charlie 
Carlson. August 
Carlson, Eric 
Carlson, J. 
Carlson. J.-3S8 
Cams ghan, w. N. 
Cheodore, Bodiou 



Kenna, Peter J. Me 

Kihl, Harry 

Kittelsen, Laurlts 

Kllngst rom, Gun- 
nar 

Klover, H.-463 

Knudsen, Daniel 

Krlstensen, Gustav 

Kristoffersen. H. B. 

Kristoffersen, Karl 
A. 

Larson. Gust. 

Larson. Olaf Edvard 

Lasskey. J. 

Lehtonen. V. 

Lindqvist. Carl 

Lovenhjelm, E. M. 

Lundberg. Erik 

Lundin. Charles 

Makelainen, J. 

Markmann, Hein- 
rich 

Matsnn. Victor 

Matteson, A. 

Mikklesen. C. 
Mvhrvold. Chris- 
tian 
Nelson. T. H. 



Christophersen.Carl Nielsen, Fred -R 29 
Clausson. G. A. -804 Nielson. N. C. 
("off man, Hilo Nlssen, James 

Comerford, L. Nilson. V. G. 

Crockstat. J. Nvstrom, Emil 

Diedrieh. Hermann Olsen. Andrew 



Edlund, J. A. 

Eichel. Charles 

Ei ikson, Alfred 
Axel 

Fagerlund, G. E. 

Forsman. Arthur 

Frietrom, I. M. 

Giffin, Jim W. 

Green, F. 

Gronvall. Johan 
Frederlk 

Grunboek. Johan 

Gunlach, John 

Gustafson, A. F. 

Gustafson, J.-432 

Gustafson, K. Os- 
kar 

Gustafson, Oskar 

Gustavsen. Ben 

Halversen. Wm. 

Ham, H. F. 

Hansen. Alf V. G. 

Hansen. Bernhard 

Hansen, Lnurlts 

Hansen, Theodor 

Harding. W.J. 
.a, Hilmar 

Helmke, F. A. 

Hendersen. J. 

Hinze. A. F. W. 

Holappa, Oskar 

Hull, Harry 

Janhunen, W. 

Janson. C. L. 

.; ansson. Carl W. 

Jean. H. G.-386 

G. L-1461 

m, Lewis 

Tensen. Rasmus 
Johannesen, Jacob 
Johanson. J. -1462 



Olsen, John B. 
Olsen. Olaf 
Olsen. N.-502 
Olsen. Peder 
Olson. Adolf 
Olson. Benny 
. W. 
rhuis. R. 
Osterling. Emil 
Pedersen. Preston 
Persins. Henry 
Petersen. Charles 
Pettor.en. K. H. 
Peterson. G. 
Peterson. Martin 
Rasmussen -4 46 
Rasmussen. Emil 
Rasmussen, Olaf 

r, H. 
Reid. James-326 
Rohstad. Sorensen 

John 
Rohde, Robert 
Rosenblad. Karl 
Royden, W. H. 
en, A . 
rsr. Theodor 
s.i a nders. Carl 
Schilling;. C. 

ize. Otto 

rg, Harald 
gvlst, otto 
Soult. Theodor 

SI i if. I,ouis-14R4 
I'm. Viprgo 
Stolsten. Karl 
Slrelow. Albert 
Svenson. Sven 
Svensson. N( 
Svensson. Thure 
Syvertsen, Isak 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE RED FRONT 



THE ONLY STORE ON THE 
WATER FRONT OP HONOLULU 
EMPLOYING WHITE LABOR 
EXCLUSIVELY. 



SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 



FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
OIL CLOTHING, TRUNKS, 
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS 

THE RED FRONT 

COR. QUEEN AND NUANU STS. 
HONOLULU, H. I. 



MYRTLE CIGAR STORE 

Importers and Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. 

The only House keeping a full line of 

Union-made Goods. 

T. J. FITZPATRICK, Proprietor. 

S3<! Fort Street. Honolulu, H. I. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 

Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor, 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanu Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Thallos. Mr. Warren, E'red 

Thompson, Stephen Werner, Ruben 

Thorve, Gustav Westerholm, Aug. 

Danielsen Whyne, Fred 

Tomask. Math. Wikstrom, Anton O. 

Wahlstadt, Albert Zugehaer, Alex. 
Walbergh, Joseph 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Anderson, Chas. Ildstad, Karl Han- 

Andersson, Lars T.- sen 

735 Klint, Sam 

A Qdersen, Nels Lehnhard, W. 

Anderson, Axel-743 Lavi, Alfred 
Asmus.sen, MacC. Mortensen, Willim 
Brown, Frank Meyerkana. Vater 

Carlson, Atel Federsen, Carl 

Carlsen, Pastar L. Pederson, Jahn 
Dircks, Chr. Peterson, Karl 

Didrecksen, Dillef Adolf 

Fleurii, Geargos Patuyarisky, R. 

Plansen, Han? Teo- Sorenssn, Thorn. 

dor Sanders, Frank 

Hnnssen, Karel Spricsles, Fritz 

Hansson, Gust. Hj. Steffany, Joseph 
Haugan, Hilmar Steinberg, E. 

Halvartsen, H. Wnlsh, P. R. 

Holnberg, Alfred A. Weiss, Wilhelm 
Johnson, John Zimmerman, Fritz 



AND, OR. 

Lindberg, John 
McRae, Alex. 
Madsen, Chas. 
Muller, Fr. 
Nelson, C.-393 
Nilsen, Henry 
Revfem, Fredtik 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Roscheck, P. 
Stephan, C. 
Saderlund, Chas. 
Tallant, E. 
Tornstrom, Chas. . 
Waalstedt- 778 
Westerlund, C. W. 



PORTL 

Berthelsen, Alt'. 
Brever, Dave 
Borini, H. L. 

Dahl, John A. 
Doose, Wm. 
Drummond, Steve 
I' ristrom, L. M. 
Fillix, Lorons 
Gilbert, W. S. 
Gunluck, John 
Haldcrsen, Adolf 
Hellander, Wm. 
Jones, John 
Jonasson, Fr. 
Janson, Harry 
Johansson, K.-1396 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

Anfindsen, O. Liilie, F. M. 

Backhaus, H!. Linden. M. A. 

Baker, L. G. Lychc. N. 

Berentsen, O. Martinsen, Fugo 

Buch, D. Mathisen, M. 

Carlson, G. Miettinen, A. H3. 

Coffman, Milo Mjones, Aruc 

Dischler, P. Nielsen, M. P. 

Dittmayer, Ch. Nyroos, O. J. 

Ellingsen, Fr. Olsen-492 

Engraan, E. Olsen, C. A. 

Erickson, John Owens, John 

Gasman, G. r-fctersen-864 

Gerner. Hans Pcttorsen, Ch. 

Hendrikson IVUersen, Peter 

Horeldscn, Ch. Stone, Wm. 

Ja< obsson, A. W. Sandberg. A. 

Jean, Guezenec Sehulze, Fr. 

Jones, Ch. Wallgren. A. 

Jordan, Ch. Wickstrom, A. 

Jorgensen. P. Widlund, C. W. 

Kuglund, C. Wilson, Rob. 
Kolderup, K. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

Adams, Walter Ingebretsen, Nils- 
Allen. Frans 407 
Andersson, A. A. Jensen, W. E. 
Andersson, J. Johanson, Ernest 
Arcadius, Ture Johanson, Frank 
Borini, Henry L. Johansson, Knut 
Bruce, John Johnson. Maune 
Cederstrom, Wm. Klein, T. 
Carroll. R. Knutzer, Charles 
Cross, L. D. Labastide, Joe 
Currie, James Laine. Francois 
De Bruin, J. Legallais, Jules 
Erikson, Aleck Lie, Carl 
Ferguson, Julius Lindberg, G. W . 
Fogarty, J. P. Lindstam, Olof A. 
Fraser, James Lundberg, K. H. 
Frazer, John R. McCarthy. John 
Garside, James Nielsen, N. 
Gilhooly. H. Nyberg, C. 
Glouaguen O'Donovan, Jack 
Gustafson, Aksel Ong, George 
Hansen, Edward Samuelsen Krist 
Hansen, H. Schilling, Carl 
Hilarion, Chas. Sorensen, C. 
Hinner, P. Swanson, F. O. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store closes at p. in.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



McGORMACK BROS. } 



# 4 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE-NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

1332 PACIFIC AVENUE, TACOMA, WASH, i 



c * t " The Union Cigar Store 

WHEN IN TACOMA 

FOR 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY AND 

PIPES. 

Local and 'Frisco Papers always on 

band. 

2223 North Thirtieth Street. 

MERRIT TERRILL, Proprietor. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor 
call at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM AND ABERDEEN 

For your Clothing, Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Shoes, Rubber 

Boots and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



UNION MADE CLOTHINC 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND CAPS 



<y^ 




WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 

Anderson, Harry Lorentzen, E. M.- 
Begowick, John 866 

Bjornstad, Nils Lubke, John Von 

Boock, Christian Mackay, Joseph 

Borlin, J. Martinson, Holger 
Bray, J. K. E. 

Brussell, Ed. Nielson, Niels 

Buch, David Nilsson, Henry 

Eidswaag, Peter Norheim, John 

Ekerlein, Frans Olsen, Paul 

Eslon, V. Pedersen, Peder 

Evans, John Pott, George 

Furlong, James Rice, Patrick B. 

Furst, Ragner Sarnde, M. J. 

Gilbert, Wm. S. Sjonborg, Harold 

Granbom, Emil Smith, A. 

Halvorsen, Isak Soderman, Oscar 

Hanson, August Starkey, Wm. 

Horsley, R. S. Stoessle, Camille 

Johansen, Geo. W. Thampson, Harry 

Johanson, Karl F. Thompson, C. M.- 
Johnsen, Martin 251 

Jorgensen, Sofus Vestergren, Anton 

Jorgensen, Walter Waldron, Harry 

Karlson, Oscar S. Weide, Paul 

Kask, John Wideberg, Oscar 

Kristianson, C. F. Zellmann, B. 

HONOLULU, H. T. 

Blair, J. L. Jorgensen, R. 

Borkman, F. Nelson, J. H. 

Cole, C. Niekel, E. 

Docanpo, M. Nyqvist, E. 

Eggers, J. Olsen, C. A. 

Eriksson, W. Oisson, H.-G51 

Evensen. A. Ouchterlong, F. 

Golden, J. H. Peabody, F. 

Grondahl, J. Roch, H. P. 

Guilaksen, H. Rhode, R. 

Halberg, H. Rhodes, E. C. 

Hillborn. P. Sohrimper, F. 

Hornberg, G. P. Sigvartsen, C. 

Hobson, T. Sigvartsen. C. O. 

Hansson, O.-L270 Sorensan, T. 

Hogman. E. Tliorsen, T. 

Hansen, M. Thomas, J. 

Jakkopsen, J. Vatland, O. 

Johnson, O. Yodt. J. 
Johnson. W. 



Letters In the OHlce of the Fishermen's 

Union of the Pacific Coast 

und Alaska. 

Anderson, K. B. Jacobsson, C. E. 

Armstrong, Gust. Linden, H. E. 
Annus, Jnliii Nelson, Pete 

Bonde, Ths. Nelson, Joh n 

Dahl, Ben. Tlshel, Mathlas 

EHasen, Edward Webster, C. 

Nekolai 



INFORMATION WANTED 

John Welsh, who left the steamer San 
Mateo at San Francisco in June last, is 
requested to communicate with the Brit- 
ish Consul-General, San Francisco. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
— Visit — 

WALTER EHRUCHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 
be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



News from Abroad. 



ABEBDEEN, WASH. 

JURNETT BROS, 

JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 




19 HERON STKEET, 



UNION MADE 

Watches & Jewelry 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 
24 Heron Street. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



You can get good 

HONEST UNION-MADE GOODS 

FROM 

A. W. BARKLEY 

56 G Street 

Becker Block, next to Bicycle Works, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 
He carries everything a sailor wears. 



Have your photographs made while in port by 

THE ABERDEEN ART GO. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 

Marine Views, Enlarging, Copying, 
& Crayon Portraits, Picture Frames. 

C. V. lOV, Prop. 
400 Market St. Aberdeen. Wash. 



FOR UNION-MADE 



Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Agency for Aberdeen Steam Laundry. 

Stand on entrance to Union Office. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



W. C JUDSON 

... EXPRESSMAN ... 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
phone ..3. ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Sailors' and Loggers' Outfitters 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoei, Rubber Boots and Oilskins. 

SKiMSt*^ GEO. FISHER 

Heron Street, ABERDEEN. \V\SII. 



The defenders of Port Arthur have 
announced their ability to hold out in- 
definitely. 

Latest reports of the battle of Shakhe 
River place the total losses in killed 
and wounded on both sides at 80,000 
men. 

The Earl of Fitzwilliam has purchas- 
ed the steamer Harlech Castle, 4,000 
tons, for a trip to the South Pacific to 
prospect for coal. 

Russian authorities now claim that 
the ten days' battle of the Shakhe River 
was a draw. Resumption of the battle 
on a large scale is believed to he immi- 
nent. 

Ilendrik Witboi, Germany's old enemy 
in Southwest Africa, has declared war 
against the Germans, and it is feared 
that the Hottentots will join in the up- 
rising. 

The Italian War Office has ordered 
all officers on vacation to return imme- 
diately to their regiments. Notice is 
also given that there will be no more 
holiday leaves. 

As the Mexican wheat crop this year, 
according to reports, indicates an in- 
crease of 5 per cent over that of last 
year the importation of that cereal prob- 
ably will not be necessary. 

The thirty-sixth anniversary of the 
beginning of the first Cuban revolution 
and the declaration of "independence or 
death" was celebrated at Havana and 
elsewhere in Cuba on October 10. 

The Portuguese Cabinet resigned on 
October 17 on account of the refusal of 
the King to agree to certain plans for a 
punitive expedition against the Guanha 
mas and other matters of moment. 

The London Daily Telegraph's St. Pe- 
tersburg correspondent gives credit to 
the report that Russia is purchasing 
seven fast cruisers, three each from 
Chile and Argentina and one from Bra- 
zil. 

Marquis Oyama reports that the 
Shakhe River battle resulted in the cap- 
ture by the Japanese of 500 prisoners 
and forty-five guns. Ten thousand, five 
hundred and fifty Russian corpses were 
counted. 

A decree dissolving the Italian Cham- 
ber of Deputies was issued October 13. 
fixing the general elections for October 
30. The Republican Deputies have de- 
cided to make common cause with the 
Socialists. 

Representatives of German, British. 
French and Belgian manufacturers, ac- 
cording to a recent dispatch from Brus- 
sels to the Frankfurter Zeitung, have 
agreed to form an international associa- 
tion to control the steel rail industry. 

The Pope has decided to hold both a 
scent and a public consistory on No- 
vember 14, merely for the preconization 
of new Bishops. No Cardinals will be 
nominated. Another consistory will be 
held December 5, but only for the can- 
onization of new saints. 

It is asserted that the Italian Cabinet 
has made all preparations to call out 
70,000 more reserves, Premier Giolitti 
wishing to have a strong contingent of 
troops throughout Italy in order to quell 
any attempts at disorder that may be 
made by the extreme parties. 

The Greek steamer Clementine, bound 
from the Black Sea for Antwerp, found- 
ered recently twenty-three miles north- 
west of Ushant. Seventeen members of 
the crew, including the master and other 
officers, were drowned. Eight survivors 
were landed at Leixoes, Porfcu 

The Russian Ball ic fleet, on its waj 
to the Far East, tired into a fi 
licet off Hull, Kng.. on the night of Oc- 
tober 21, killing several men and dam 

aging the boats. If is said that the 

British Government has demanded an 
apology and indemnity, which it is be 
lieved will be promptlj rendered by the 
{ Russian Government. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



White roustabouts have been emploj 
ed on many steamers at New Orleans, 
La., in place of negroes, who, it i> al- 
"struck too often." 

The Shenango (Pa.) tin mill resumed 
wink on October 8. Two thousand tin 
workers are employed. The Greer tin 
plant is also expected to resume. 

The new organization of window-glass 

Cutters and Batteners, which was formed 

at Pittsburg, Pa., recently, has been rec- 
ognized by the American Window Glass 
( lompany. 

"Independent Associate Carpenters" 
recently took the places of the striking 
Brotherhood and Amalgamated Carpen- 
ters on the annex to the Bellevue-Strat- 
ford at Philadelphia, Pa. 

The employes of the Reading (l'a.) 

Railroad Company's shops have received 
their checks for September. Over $110, 
000 was distributed. The sum of $90,- 
000 more was distributed later to the 
railroad men. 

Suits which aggregate in the neighbor- 
hood of $14.(100,00(1 have been filed 
against the City of New York by work- 
men in the various City departments for 

back pay. due from failure to comply 

with the "prevailing rate of wages" law. 

The trial of Philip \\ einscimer. for- 
mer President of the New York Building 
Trades Alliance, who is under two in- 
dictments charging extortion, began on 
October 10, before Judge Newburger in 
the Court of Genera] Sessions at New 
York City. 

Seamstresses of Philadelphia, Pa., met 
recently and thanked President Boose 

velt for his intervention which enabled 
them to continue to obtain work on sol 

fliers' garments given out at the Schuyl- 
kill Arsenal. They also decided to form 
a permanent organization. 

The strike of the Baggage and Parcel 
Drivers' Union, of Chicago, against the 
Frank E. Scott Transfer Company, which 
seriously crippled the movement of bag- 
to and from the hotels in thai city, 
ended on October 13. The differences 

were explained and the drivers returned 
to work. 

United States Senator Penrose, of 
Pennsylvania, returned to Philadelphia 
recently from Washington, whither, it 
i-~ said, lie was called by President 
Roosevelf to discuss a means of placat- 
ing the leaders of labor unionism, whose 
attitude toward the Republican national 
ticket ha- caused genuine alarm among 
the party leaders. 

There has been a 50 per cent, reduction 

of the force at the Baldwin Locomotive 
Works since January 1 of the present 
year. At that time there were on the 
Company's rolls 16,000 men working 120 
hours per week in two shifts, viz., 9,000 
men in day shift and 7.000 men in night 
shift. The force at work at present time 
is 8,000 men, and the night work has 
been discontinued. 

Secretary Nichols, of the Mine Board 
of Conciliation, has made an assessment 
of $1,500 on the miners and operators 
to defray the expenses of the Board. It 
costs on an average $300 to take an ap- 
peal up from the Conciliation Board to 
the umpire, and the appeal to Judge 
Gray on the check weighman dispute 
cost the Board $700. The operators pay 
half of the assessment and the miners 
the other half. 

Recently published Census figures 
show that every fifth child between the 
of ten and fifteen in the United 
States is a bread -whim r. One out of 
three of these child workers is a girl. 
There are said to be 1,750,178 children 
regularly employed, an increase of 38% 

per cent in ten years. Alabama has the 
highest percentage Of child labor, finding 
work for 27.- per cent of her children, 
while .Massachusetts has the low -t. hav- 
ing only 0.5 per cent of her juvenile 
population at work. 



SAWTELLE CLOTHING STORE 



H. A. SCHWARTZ, Prop. 



Headquarters for Seamen's Wearing Apparel. 
A complete line of Union Made goods in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods, 
Oil Clothing, Rubber Boots, etc., etc. 



AGENTS 



Just around corner 
from Union Office, 



FOR W. L. DOUGLAS • SHOES 
$3 00 to $5.00, Union Made 

307 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



THE MODEL 

Strictly Union Store 

Full line of Hen's Wear, 
Hats, Shoes and Rubber 
Goods. Fish brand Oil 
Clothing. Suits made to 
Order. Fit Guaranteed. 

AUG. GUSTAFSON, 437 Second St. 

EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WESGOBD, Proprietor. 



First-Class Board and Lodging 

Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR SALE 



VOLUME XVII 



OF THE 



COAST SEAMEN'S 

JOURNAL 

Bound and Indexed 



PRICE $2.00 

To unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union 

of America, or members thereof. 



APPLY TO BUSINESS MANAGER 

COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



O'CONNORS CIGARS 

The popular favorites. Equal in flav- 

iir and aroma to cigars of twice their 

cost. They are made by union men, 

tore always reliable and in good 

condition. Best value ever known. 

C. O'CONNOR 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

S3S Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 

BY THE 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

403 FIRST STREET, EUREKA. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City or County on short notice. 

HALTINNER & JOHNSON, Proprietors 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DEI, \M:V A: YOUNG 



The Humboldt Lodging House 

F. BORGES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE IN 
EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



American Exchange Hotel 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



EXPRESS NJLJ0I 

Starid near Sailors' Union OfT.ce. 

F. F. JOHNSON. 

I'li.me Hood 356. PORTLAND, OR. 



Board and lodging, %5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 25c and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



.Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

Has Removed to 439 Second St. 

CORNER OF F, 

White Labor Only. EUREKA, CAL. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



WHEN IN PORT CALL AT 

South Bay Hotel 

FIELDS LANDING. 



Headquarters for Seamen. 

NEW YORK LODGING HOUSE 

Aldebt Hallek, Prop. 

Newly Furnished Rooms. Entirely Remodeled 

Prices Moderate. Phone Hood 352. 

203 BURNSIDE STREET. 

Cor. From, near First PORTLAND, OR 



INFORMATION WANTED 



J. B. BIRD, Proprietor. 



Good Board and Lodging* by day, week 
or month. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



5 



hORlTY OP 




From 
Maker to Wearer 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coaat selling goods at less 

than Eastern prices. 

THE BLUE FRONT 

Manufacturers and Retailers 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

S12 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. SEATTLE, WASH. 



Phone Red 1786 

IRA A. CAMPBELL 

PROCTOR IN ADMIRALTY. 

Rooms 210-217 Bailey Building. 
Seattle, Wash. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR EXAMINATION 
NEVER HAD A FAILURE. TERMS MODERATE 

Navigation 

— AND — 

Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. JAS. MARSHALL 

6H First Ave. , Seattle Compasses Adjusted 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W.J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Miss Helen C. Smith, - - Instructor 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
aail, American and British. 
222SVi First Ave. Phone Black 5424. 

Capt, Sorensen's Navigation School 

Established 1899. 
105 PASSED— NO FAILURES 

Room 59, . . Safe Deposit Building 

First Avenue, foot of Cherry Street, 
SEATTLE!, WASH. 



John Mullen, who was employed as 
fireman on the steamer Ventura some 
two and one-half years ago, is requested 
to communicate with his wife at 69 
Clyde St., Anderston, Glasgow. 

C. Roach, who left the British ship 
I. j nt on at San Francisco in February, 
1900, is requested to communicate with 
his mother. Mi-. Mary Roach, 4 Queen 
St., Queenstown, Ireland. 

Information regarding the wherea- 
bouts of Friedrich Wilhelm Budde, born 
at Coeln-Deutz, April 1, 1868, who left 
Germany twenty years ago as a cabin 
boy, and last wrote to his relatives from 
Santa Barbara, Cal., in 1891, is respect- 
fully requested. German Consulate, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. HABERER, PROP. 

161 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE 

Carries a full line of Clg-ars, Tobaccos 

and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone Ind. 118. 




CJ-OTHING HOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Boots, Shies 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

All Union Made Goods 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



BONNEY & STEWART 
UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping; a 
specialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Pine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James C. Bartlett, aged 34, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

K. A. Johnsson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Rendal, in 1902, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

John Welsh, a native of Central Amer- 
ica, member of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Martin Andersen, a native of Tors- 
lando, Oland. Sweden, is inquired for by 
his brother, G. Andersen, at present in 
the Marine Hospital at San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Herman Heino, native of Finland, aged 
25, who left Australia one year ago in 
the schooner Golden Shore, bound for 
Puget Sound, is inquired for. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Emil Enberg, a native of Finland, 
aged about 30 years; last heard of in 
San Francisco a year ago, is inquired 
for by Captain S. A. Enlund, ship Glen- 
ard. Address, W. R. Grace & Co., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

0. Peter Valdemar Petersen, born in 
1867 in Kallunborg, Denmark, last heard 
of in 1896, when sealing from San Fran- 
cisco, and was living in Rio Vista dur- 
ing the winter from 1890 to 1894, is 
inquired for by his brother, P. C. Peter- 
sen, box 41, San Pedro, Cal. 




SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



UNION MADE BY UNION MAIDS 



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V 



California Undertaking Co. 

Private Residence Parlors 

R. J Devlin, Manage-* 
W. L. LlNOSCY. SECRETARY 

CORNER POST 406 POWELL ST 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 

OPEN »AY AND MIHT TELEPHONE MAIN PY1 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hull. 

We Sell the Kind of Goods You Require. 

EXTRA STRONG HICKORY SHIRTS \ 

BEST OVERALLS f |mmM . ...... 

GOOD LUMBER SHOES ( UN,0N LABEL 

STOCKTON FLANNEL UNDERWEAR) 

ALSO A FULL, LINE OF GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS AND HATS. 
Look at our Goods. You will be pleased. No trouble to show them. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

Of California. 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL S3, OOO 000.00 

PAID UP CAPITAL AND RESERVE SI, 725, 000. 00 

• Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian or Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Probate Court 
proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposit and savings. Investments care- 
fully selected. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, Horace H. Hill, H. Brunner, 

' President. Vice-President. Cashier. 




A. ANDERSON, 



The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Comer Drumm and Commercial Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone James 4846 

A new building erected especially for 
sailors. Latest improvements, clean and 
light rooms, bath, reading and dining 
rooms. First class board and lodging at 
reasonable rates. Gospel service — Sun- 
days, 3:45 p. m., and Wednesdays, 8 
o'clock p. m. All welcome. 

Missionary and Manager 



UNION STORE 

FOR UNION SAILORS 
AND FISHERMEN 

By making cash sales only we are 
enabled to sell at the lowest figure. 



STABENS & FRIEDMAN 

CLOTHIERS and OUTFITTERS 

257-259 Pacific St. 

Between Battery and Front, San Francisco 



JOE HARRIS 

Sea-faring . Men's . Outfitter 

Ready Made Uniforms. 
Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., near EAST 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



H. WARRINGTON 

SAILORS' FURNISHING GOODS 

Union-made Shoes, Uata, Caps, Under- 
wear, Tobacco, etc. 



You'll find everything strictly first class. 

711 Davis Street, near Broadway. 

(Opposite Pier 9.) 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL WITH THE UNION LABEL. 
We give you a square deal. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH - SIDE - HOTEL 

800 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and King Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and lodging, *6 per week. All 
rooms single. 



EXPRESSING 

— Done by — 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Cor. East and Mission Sts, 



Sailors Outfitting Store 

J. GOOD9IAN 

110 Berry St., San Francisco 

The Best Goods in the Market. 



M. A. JVIAHER 

men's - Furnishing: - Goods 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Workingmen's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 

206 EAST STREET, NEAR HOWARD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



PRANK JOHNSON 
SAN PEDRO HOTEL 

6 HOWARD STREET, S. F. 



Newly furnished. Large and airy 
rooms by the day, week or month, at 
reasonable rates. 

FIVE MEAL TICKETS, $1. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Alfred St. James, a seaman sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

John Williams, alias John W. Assars- 
son, a native of Sundsvall, Sweden, last 
heard of in San Francisco, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

G. L. Jensen, who sailed from San 
Francisco about January 12 last on the 
schooner Emma Utter and discharged on 
arrival at Gray's Harbor, is requested 
to call at the United States Shipping 
Commissioner's office at San Francisco. 

Oscar Sander, aged 15, dark hair, 
brown eyes; left the Orphans' H'.ne at 
Los Angele'. several years ago to ship as 
cabin boy in a vessel at San Pedro, Cal., 
is inquired for. Anyone knowing his 
present whereabouts will please notify 
the Coast Seamxn's Joubnal. 



Domestic and Naval. 



The White Star line inaugurated a 
New York-Mediterranean service October 
20, with the sailing of the Republic for 
Naples and Genoa. 

The schooner Eliza A. Seribner, from 
Wilmington, N. C, for New York, which 
arrived at Delaware Breakwater recent- 
ly, had three of her crew sick with fever. 

A New York inventor has constructed 
a life-preserver of metal which will be 
submitted to the Supervising Inspectors 
of the Steamboat Service at the forth- 
coming annual meeting. 

The Nova Scotian schooner Wentworth 
was driven ashore on Chatham (Mass.) 
Bar on October 13 during a raging gale, 
and her master, his wife, three children 
and seven seamen were drowned. 

The Weems line of steamboats, the 
Chester River Steamboat Company and 
the Queen Anne*s Railroad Company, 
were merged at Baltimore, Md., recently, 
with a total capitalization of $3,205,- 
000. 

The Hamburg-American line an- 
nounces that steerage passenger rates 
from Hamburg, Boulogne and Cherbourg 
to New York will shortly be advanced 
to $35. The rate from Great Britain 
will remain at $15. 

Captain Shepherd, of Philadelphia. 
Pa., has purchased the bark Alice, built 
at Weymouth, Mass., in 1881, and regis- 
tering 819 tons. The vessel is now at 
New York, and will be placed in the 
general coasting trade. 

The British steamer Kelvin, Captain 
McClellan, from New York October 5 
for Montevideo, Buenos Ayres and Ro- 
sario, foundered in the Gulf Stream on 
October 7. Her crew were saved and 
landed at Ponce, Porto Rico. 

The schooner Chauncey E. Burk, Cap- 
tain Dilks, which sailed from Kaighn's 
Point, Camden, N. J., at 5 p. m. on Oc- 
tober 5, arrived at Cardenas on the 
morning of the 12th, completing the 
trip in the fast time of six and one-half 
days. 

The United States armored cruiser 
Colorado, built by the Cramps, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa., made an average speed of 
22.26 knots per hour during her official 
trial trip over the New England course 
on October 24. The contract speed is 
22 knots. 

The three-masted schooner Mollie S. 
Look was recently launched at Machias, 
Me. Her dimensions are: Length, 159 
feet; breadth, 30.1 feet; depth, 12.8 feet; 
tonnage, 572 gross, 457 net. She will be 
commanded by Captain O. W. Look, of 
Jonesport. 

The American ship Aryan, from Hono- 
lulu for Delaware Breakwater, with su- 
gar, was spoken in latitude 27 degrees 
48 minutes south, longitude 33 degrees 
west, by the American ship Edward 
Sewall, recently arrived at Philadelphia, 
Pa., from Honolulu. 

The United States brig Boxer, the first 
of her class, was launched at the Ports- 
mouth (N. H.) Navy Yard on October 
11. The Boxer is to be used as a train- 
ing-ship by the Naval Academy at An- 
napolis. She is 125 feet C inches in 
length, and has a displacement of 450 
tons. 

The lightship maintained on Lurcher 
Shoal, off Yarmouth, N. S., has been fit- 
ted with a submarine bell, which, during 
thick weather, will strike the lightship's 
number, 14, every twenty-three seconds, 
as follows: One stroke; five seconds in- 
terval ; four strokes at intervals of two 
seconds; then an interval of 10 seconds. 
Vessels equipped with receiving appar- 
atus are expected to be able to hear the 
bell at five miles, and determine its 
bearing within a quarter of a point. 
Vessels not so equipped should receive 
a warning signal at from one to two 
miles, depending on the construction of 
the ship. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the 'Wits. 



Misunderstood. — Doctor — "You must 
have some change first, and then we'll 
see what we can do for you." 

Patient — "Don't be afraid. Your bill 
will bo paid." 



Those Girls. — Nell — "Mr. Kammerer is 
so kind. lie said 1 took a very pretty 
and very artistic picture." 

Belle — "Indeed? And whose picture 
did you take, dear?" 



Disappointed. — Xell — "Yes, she refus- 
ed him, but it almost broke her heart." 

Belle— "Really?" 

Nell — "Yes, when >!n- discovered that 
it hadn't broken his." 



Nut for Him. — "Well, old man. this i.< 
the first time I've seen you since your 
marriage. Bow dues your wifi treat 
you ?" 

■ "She doesn't. Why, she even kicks if 
anybody else treats me." 



The l.'sual Way.— Doctor — "Don't ride 
to and from work. You shouldn't si; 
down BO much." 

Patient— "I don't." 

Doctor — "Ah! You walk, then?" 

Patient "No; I hang to a strap mosi 
ly." 



Out of His Head. — "Gee, whizz! 
You're preMj badly cut up," remarked 
the friend. 

"I guess l am," replied Shaffer. 

"That b what you get for going out in 
an automobile." 

"No; it's what I gol for going out of 
an automobile." 



Hit first Attempt. — 
Said the bride: "Here's my first batch 

of biscuit. 
Just wait! From the oven I'll whis- 
cuit." 
How the poor woman cried, 
When her hubby replied: 
"Let it burn! I don't think I should 
riscuit." 



The Tooter — 
He's going to great pains with his music 
this fall, 
With his trombone each evening he la- 
bors. 
But the pains that he goes to are noth- 
1 all 
To the pains that have come to the 
neighbors. 



LUNDSTROM'S 



UNION 

MADE 



$2.50 HATS 



PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market Street, opposite Central 
Theater, and GOO Kearny Street. 



Country Orders solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
Glut 




Established 

Over 

30 Years 

on the 

Pacific 

Coast 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




Union made 

Clothing 



rSSUED BYAnTHOWTYtf 




BESSfEKED 



We were one of the first firms in the 
United States to put the union label on our 
garments. As we manufacture our own 
stock, all our clothes bear the union label. 

Other stores in San Francisco have a few union-made lines 
to show union men. 

Every thing is union made in our establishment. 
In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a 
saving of middlemen's profits. 

Ready-made suits and overcoats from $10.00 to $35-°° 
Made-to-measure clothes from #10.00 to $45 00. 



'w: 



I 



S. IN. WOOD <& CO. 

740 ./Market St., San Francisco. 




James A. Sorensen Co* 

Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians 



103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 

TELEPHONE JESSIE 2821 



Below Mission 
san francisco 
Eyes Tested 



Jamox Sf. Sorenson, 



All Watch Eepairing Warranted for two years 
Free by an expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

The Big Jewelry Store 



Union Men and Women 

The Following San Francisco Shoe Stores 
are Displaying the Union Store Card : 



G. FISHER, 

PHILADELPHIA SHOE CO., 
RIGHTWAY SHOE CO., 
ROYAL SHOE CO., . 
J. T. SULLIVAN CO., 
WALKOVER SHOE STORE, 
H. WOLF & BRO., . 



945 Market St. 

10 Third St. 

812-814 Market St. 

50 Third St. 

20 Fourth St. 

924 Market St. 

208 Sixth St. 



(Otherwise known an SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between lKng and Berry Sts., San Franelsco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly UNION 
MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market prices give me a call. 
Do not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylors Nautical School 




506 



BATTERY STREET 

COR. WASHINGTON STREET 



u'Tc'u.tom House SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest and best 
equipped private Nautical School in the United States, 
Graduates prepared for the American and British 
Merchant Marine examinations. Warrant officers of 
the United States Navy prepared for examination for 
commissioned officers. Special course for cadets en- 
tering the United States Naval Academy and Ameri- 
can Merchant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for both young 
and old navigators, is now in the Library of every 
Pacific Mail steamship, in many Universities, and is 
highly recommended by many noted navigators. 
Send for circulars and testimonials. 




Men's Flannelette 

Night Shirts 

at 45c. 



Made generously full for 
freedom and eaBe and com- 
fort, 52 inches long, all sizes, 
15 to L9. Made with turn- 
down c'llars or military col- 
lars. In pink, blue or gray 
stripes. 



San Francisco's 

8-Hour Good Goods Store 

Market St., Near Sixth 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Sailors' .mil Firemen's Clothing 

nnd General Supplies. 



COLBY & FITZPATRICK 

17Ms Steuart Street, 

Bet Market <t Mission, - San Francisco 



..SMOKE... 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNIONJ/IADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

32 1 BATTERY STREET. 



"LA CORTINA" 

CLEAR UNION MADE HAVANA 

MASCOT) Best 5 cent 
BLUE CAP J Cigars 

FACTORY, 111 TURK STREET 



STILL ON DECK 



ED. ANDERSEN 



7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY 

LUMBER HOOKS 



Scotty's Milwaukee 
Sweaters and Jackets 

Have stood the test against all competitors 

Lake Farlnjr Men All Knoir It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
MAIL FOR 9 3.30 
ll**«nre of Imitations 

WILLIAM LISLE 

••SCOTTY" 

III MEN0MENEE ST., MILWAUKEE, WIS 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XVIII. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1904. 



Whole No. 890. 



LAW OF THE LABOR MOVEMENT. 



A. F. of L. Based Upon Good Principle, 



Industrialism, An Old Error and a New Danger. 



<< 



H 



ISTORY repeats itself." The source of this 
adage is found in the fact that men do 
not read history, or reading, fail to un- 
derstand and be guided by the lessons of the past. 
The history of failure repeats itself simply because 
each successive generation esteems its own powers too 
highly, forgetting that like causes produce like ef- 
fects. 

The laws of nature are implacable and unchanging. 
Human progress is attainable only so far as human 
effort conforms to, and impossible to the extent that 
it conflicts with, these laws. We compare the efforts 
of our ancestors to make fire by rubbing two sticks 
together, with our own power to set a city ablaze by 
the touch of a finger. We glory in our achievement, 
and yet in all his pride and pomp the scientific or 
mechanical genius of to-day, who "harnesses the ele- 
ments" and makes them do his bidding, stands upon 
the same level as his predecessor of the distant past, 
in the sense that both work under the same natural 
law. It is only in the matter of "harness" that the 
modern man has improved upon the ancient. 

An Edison who should ignore the law. of friction 
Mould be more helpless among the marvels of the 
twentieth century than was Crusoe on his South Sea 
island. All human progress in the mastery of 
nature's physical forces is after all but progress in 
the service of nature's laws. The "discoveries" of 
each generation are merely so many pages of nature's 
law unfolded to man's unlettered mind. The aero- 
naut and the acrobat are said to "defy the law of 
gravity," when in fact they but exemplify that law 
by the application of certain well-known rules. 

The universal law of our being is as clear and as 
potent in the intellectual as in the physical world. 
In his association with his fellows man is governed 
by certain fundamental conditions, upon the recogni- 
tion and observance of which depends his success in 
any given form of activity. We speak of the gre- 
garious instinct as the prime characteristic of the 
genus homo; but we too often forget that man's dis- 
position to "get together" with his fellows grows out 
of and rests upon a still deeper instinct, namely, the 
instinct of equality. Out of this instinct has been 
coined 1 he rule: "Association in equality is the first 
law of human progress." Thus, although we may say 
with perfect truth that man's first natural impulse 
is toward association (i. e., organization), we must 
also recognize that such association depends for its 
power and permanence upon the essential element of 
equality. Associations of man succeed or fail, endure 
or pass away, in proportion as they conform to or 
conflict with this natural law in the case. A body 
of men formed upon a basis of inequality as between 



its respective components, or which at any period of 
its existence establishes or permits such inequality, 
is powerless to perpetuate itself, precisely as the 
acrobat is powerless to remain in air after he loses a 
certain degree of momentum. 

These reflections are aroused by conditions now 
shaping themselves within the American Federation 
of Labor. The annual convention of that body meets 
within a few days amid circumstances unprecedented 
in the history of the labor movement in this, and 
probably in any other country. The recent growth 
of organization among the workers of the United 
States has been phenomenal; the successes attained 
by organized labor have been proportionately marked. 
This growth and these successes have aroused public 
interest as acute as it is widespread. Whereas for- 
merly public interest in the Tabor movement was con- 
fined to the comparatively few who by the natural 
qualities of mind and heart were disposed to look 
kindly upon the organized efforts of the workers, 
there now exists a great volume of public sentiment, 
arising not out of natural friendliness for, but 
out of natural hostility to the principles and prac- 
tices of organized labor. 

The tide of criticism has risen far above all pre- 
vious marks. Every conceivable, and many an incon- 
ceivable, source of opinion has contributed, according 
to its ability, to the deluge. Press and pulpit, the 
great magazines and the little country weeklies, the 
university professor and the backwoods pedagogue — 
all have united to make up the grand aggregate of 
"public opinion against the unions." Partly as the 
cause and partly as the effect of these developments, 
we have an anti-union organization, formed upon na- 
tional lines and having its ramifications in almost 
every city, town and village in the country. 

This situation demands, as doubtless it will re- 
ceive, the serious thought of the American Federation 
of Labor. Without either minimizing or exaggerat- 
ing the significance of the existing circumstances, it 
may be said that the immediate future of organized 
labor in the United States is endangered not so much 
by the attitude of its critics and opponents as by 
its own conduct in the present crisis, not so much by 
its conduct toward the public as by its conduct to- 
ward itself. In a word, the success or failure of the 
opposition to trade-unionism depends mainly upon 
the success or failure of the trade-unions in recogniz- 
ing and adhering to the principles upon which these 
organizations are founded and to which they owe 
their past and present growth. So long as the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor remains true to these prin- 
ciples the present opposition is to be welcomed for 
the educational results that will follow therefrom; 



but in the face of a departure from these principles 
the anti-union forces are to be feared for the harm 
that they will almost certainly inflict upon the trade- 
unions of the present day. 

When we consider the numerous charges made 
against the trade-unions we find them to be so many- 
variants of one general indictment. The charge of 
"immorality" is at once the keynote and the refrain 
of our opponents. In substantiation of this charge 
individual instances of "grafting" on the part of 
trade-union officials and of "monopolistic tenden- 
cies" on the part of certain organizations are cited 
and, it may be, proved. Now, the labor movement 
can very well afford to admit these charges so far as 
they are proved, while at the same time denying the 
inference sought to be deduced from the cases cited, 
namely, that these cases illustrate the rule in trade- 
unionism. Indeed, the instances of "graft" and 
"monopoly" are but the exceptions which tend to 
prove the rule of honesty, liberality and democracy 
in the administration of trade-union affairs. 

The American labor movement may return an em- 
phatic negative to the charge that it is passing 
through a "moral crisis" in its relations to the pub- 
lic. But — and here lies the more important question 
— can the labor movement with equal confidence and 
justification deny the issue of a "moral crisis" in the 
treatment of its internal affairs? The labor move- 
ment is true to the public; is it true to itself? Stat- 
ed in concrete form, the question is: Do the "juris- 
diction" disputes now engaging the attention of the 
labor movement grow out of a proper conception of 
the relations that should exist between the respective 
crafts? Shall these disputes be settled in accord- 
ance with the principles upon which the American 
Federation of Labor is founded? These questions 
constitute an issue of "moral crisis" within the labor 
movement; they should arrest the thought and enlist 
the effort of every trade-unionist, for, as sure as we 
live, the welfare, nay the existence, of organized 
labor for years to come depends upon the manner of 
their disposition. 

While the present situation is without precedent in 
respect to the forces which have been arrayed in 
open or covert hostility to organized labor, or even 
in respect to the history of the American Federation 
of Labor itself, there is no lack of evidence in the 
history of the bodies which preceded the latter to 
afford light and guidance in avoiding a repetition of 
the errors of the past. In the light of experience no 
honest trade-unionist need be at a moment's loss in 
deciding upon his course of action. Practically the 
only question is one of returning to first principles 
To know these principles it is only necessary to refer 
to the early history of the Federation. 

As we review the origin ami decline of the numer- 
ous national labor unions and brotherhoods which 
antedated the American Federation of Labor the line 
of differentiation between the former and the latter 
stands out broad and clear, namely the line that 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



separates the industrial from the trade-union form 
of organization. We know that primarily the Feder- 
ation had its ineeption in a revolt against the indus- 
trial system as practiced in part by the Knights of 
Labor. The sentiment in favor of autonomous, or 
self-governing, trade-unionism, as distinguished from 
the mixed assembly, or industrial, system was well 
expressed in a manifesto issued by the second con- 
vention of the Federation, held at Cleveland, O., in 
1882, as follows: 

We favor this Federation because it is the most 
natural assimilative form of bringing the trade and 
labor unions together. It preserves the industrial 
autonomy and distinctive character of each trade 
and labor union, and, without doing violence to their 
faith or traditions, blends them all in one har- 
monious whoh — a "federation id' trade and labor 
unions." Such a body looks to the organization of 
the working classes as workers, and not as poli- 
ticians. It makes the qualities id' a man as a worker 
the only test of fitness, and sets up no political or 
religious test of membership. It strives for the 
unification of all labor, not by straining at an en- 
forced union of diverse thought and widely separate 
methods; not by prescribing a uniform plan of or- 
ganization, regardless of their experience or inter- 
ests; not by antagonizing or destroying existing 

organizations, but by preserving all that is integral 
or good in them and by widening their scope so that 
each, without destroying their individual character, 

may act together in all that concerns them. 

Upon these lines the American Federation of Labor 
was founded; by adherence to these lines the Federa- 
tion has become the most powerful and effective 
organization in the history of the labor movement, 
the while its immediate predecessor, the once-pow- 
erful Knights of Labor, has dwindled to a mere 
memory. The declaration here quoted has been re- 
affirmed by the Federation upon numerous occasions. 
A leaflet issued by the Federation for organizing pur- 
poses say> : 

We assert that it is the duty, as it is also the plain 
interest, of all working people to organize as such, 
meet in council, and take practical steps to effect the 
unity of the working class, as an indispensable pre- 
liminary to any successful attempt to eliminate the 
evils of' which we. as a class, so bitterly and justly 
complain. That this much desired unity has never 
been achieved is owing in a great measure to the non- 
recognition of the autonomy, or the right of self- 
government, of the several trades. The American 
federation of Labor, however, avoids the fatal rock 
oil which previous organizations, having similar aims, 
have split, by simply keeping in view this funda- 
mental principle as a landmark, which none but the 
nio-t infatuated would have ever lost sight of. 

Another Federation leaflet contains the following: 

From its inception it (the Federation) has taken 
tin stand thai while unions of miners, sailors, shoe- 
makers, eigarmakcrs and printers, must each and all 
be lett entirely free to govern themselves within their 
own borders, yet. that between the members of all 
these unions there should be a bond a- yivat. &s that 
between the members of the same union. 

In -till another publication the Federation say-: 

It aims to allow — in the light of experience — the 
utmost liberty to each organization in the conduct 
of its own affairs consistent with the generally un- 
derstood principles of labor. 

The same publication says that "each national or 
international union must be protected in it^ particu- 
lar held against rivals and seceders." 

In view of these clear-cut declarations of policy, 
and in view of the success that has flowed from that 
policy, as compared with the failure of the policies 
pursued by its predecessors, the Federation can be 
in no doubt as to its course in the settlement of the 
"jurisdiction" disputes now pending before it. 

The argument for industrialism is based upon the 
assumption that modern condition- of production 
necessitate placing all employes in a given industry 
under the authority of a Bingle organization. In 
other words, it is argued that the introduction and 
continual improvement of machinery, with the re- 
sultant effect of concentrating numerous trades under 
a Bingle management and the corresponding elimina- 
tion (d* individual skill as a factor in the case, has 
reduced the power of the individual trade union 
to protect its members. This contention is by no 
means a new one; 6n the contrary, it is the old con- 
tention upon which many past efforts to form an 
effective federation of labor's forces were based. 

Here, again, we are fortunate in the records which 
the history of the labor movement present for our 
guidance. To quote a single example of these rec- 
ords, and one the reliability of which can not be 
questioned, Richard T. Ely, in his "Labor Movement 
in America," says: 

Hie (dder trade-unions were perhaps the only form 
oi organization which could be usefully employed in 
an earlier period; but, although still useful, they 

(Continued on page 7.) 



Trade-Union Congress. 

The Thirty-seventh Annual Congress of 
the Trade-Unions of the United King- 
dom was held in tho Town Sail, Leeds, on 
Monday, September 5, and five following 
days. The Congress was presided over by 
the Chairman of the Parliamentary Com- 
mittee. Mr. R. Bell, M. P., General Secre- 
tary of the Amalgamated Society of Railway 
Servants. 

Tin' Congress eonsists of representatives 
iif trade-unions who are actually working at 
their trade at the time of their appointment, 
nr are permanent paid officials of the unions 
they represent. Trade-unions may send one 
delegate for every 2,000 members or frac- 
tion thereof, but many of the larger socie- 
ties do not send the lull Dumber of delegates 
to which they are entitled. Voting mi im- 
portant questions is by card, mi the principle 
of one vote for every 1.0(H) members repre- 
sented. 

The analysis into groups of trades given 
below shows the composition of the < ''digress, 
and the trade groups represented are com- 
pared with the corresponding figures for the 
( longress of 1903 : 



1 


cj 


182,942 
873,826 

68,261 

166,721 

68,786 
49,819 
2,840 
81,646 

7,000 

89,082 

38,984 


1 


c 9 - 


r. Tl -^ — 1- 'C: — T. -r r. :::w^ 1- •— 


S? 


C - = 

. ■ o 


— © y: r: — ,.- e •& - — ~ ~. zi o» -r -i 


8 


1 


53 


347,156 
36,008 
68,88! 
60,250 

157,579 

127,588 
7S.7III 
46,792 

8,900 
81,668 

6,980 

■■■--■22 


?1 


y, — 5: 


3 -z i- 3 x ~< ■£> ci y. cv -t -i t -r i- '.o 

CJ 00 *h tl « C- C-i -3- « ^ -- ^ ,-i 




c = = 
.so 

C *S 

SB 5 = 


— i- :::::ii':;i.;-:tc:i- ifl ?i 






9 

o 
5, 

3 
O 
u 


Building 

Other Metal Trades 

Clothing 

Transport (Land and Sem 

Chemical, lias and General Laborer* 


C 

r- 





is 






o xt 

s § 

- a 

■u. o 

ll 



The number of organizations accounted 
for in the above statement is 159, but allow- 
ing for the number of distinct societies in- 
cluded in Federations, members of about 222 
separate trade-unions attended Congress as 
delegates this year out of a total of about 
1,1 So unions in existence. The membership 
represented, however, comprised about 70 
per cent of the total membership of all trade- 
unions. The number of organizations repre- 
sented this year is three less than in 1903, 
but the total membership is greater by 19,- 
700. This increase is more than accounted 
for by the re-appearance in the list of the 
Northumberland Miners' Association, -who 
were not represented last year. As in 1903, 
however, there has been a falling off in the 
membership of the general labor group of 
trades. 

Among the principal industrial subjects on 
which the Congress passed resolutions were: 
Restriction of the hours of labor to eight per 



day for miners and for workpeople gener- 
ally ; certificates of competency for persons 
in charge of steam-engines and boilers; 
trade-unions to undertake industrial assur- 
ance; reduction of naturalization fees to alien 
workmen ; amendment of the law in relation 
to trade-unions and industrial disputes ; the 
appointment of a Minister of Labor ; amend- 
ment of the Klines Regulation Act, the 
Factory and Workshops Acts, the Shop 
Clubs Act, the Workmen's Compensation 
Aets, and the Truck Acts; reduction of fees 
for Registrars 9 certificates of death when re- 
quired for trade-unions; general old-age pen- 
sions; the character note system; wages of 
Government employes, and improved hous- 
ing accommodations for working people. 

A resolution in favor of comimlsory arbi- 
tration in trade disputes was rejected by 
SG9,000 to 383,000 votes. 

Delegates representing the American Fed- 
eration of Labor of the United States, the 
Co-operative Union, the Labor Representa- 
tion Committee, and the General Federation 
of Trade- ITiinns, attended the Congress and 
delivered addresses. Two British delegates 
were elected to attend the annual conference 
of the American Federation of Labor, to be 
held in November next. 

The voting by the Congress for members 
of the Parliamentary Committee for the en- 
suing year resulted in representatives of the 
following combination-; being elected : Amal- 
gamated Brassworkers, Barge Builders, Boot 
and Shoe Operatives, Miners' Federation of 
Great Britain, London Compositors, Amal- 
gamated Railway Servants, Gas Workers 
and General Laborers, Amalgamated Cotton 
Spinners, Boilermakers and Iron Ship 
Builders, Northern Counties Weavers, Asso- 
ciated Shipwrights, and National Dock La- 
I Hirers. There was no opposition to the re- 
election of the Secretary to the Committee. 

The balance sheet presented by the audi- 
tors showed a total income of £4,443 (inclu- 
sive of a balance of £1,75 1 from the Leicester 
Congress), and an expenditure of £2,347, 
leaving a balance in hand of £2,090. It was 
decided that the Congress of next year should 
be held at Hanlev. — British Labor Gazette. 



Canadian Shipping. 

The total number of vessels on the registry 
books of the Dominion of Canada on Decem- 
ber 31, 1903, including old and new vessels, 
sailing vessels, and steamers and barges, was 
7,020, registering 083,147 tons, an increase 
over 1902 of 184 vessels and 30,534 tons. 
The number of steamers on the registry 
books on the same date was 2,419, with a 
gross tonnage of 338,251 tons. Assuming the 
average value to be $30 a ton, the value of 
the registered tonnage of Canada December 
31, 1903, was about $20,494,410. 

The number of new vessels built and n 
tered in the Dominion during the last year 
was 328, of 30,323 tons. The estimated 
value of these vessels, at $45 a ton, is $1,364,- 
535. 

The 7,020 ships and steamers are divided 
by provinces as follows : Ontario, 1,778 ; 
Quebec, 1,228; Nova Scotia, 2,069; New 
Brunswick, 929; British Columbia, 629; 
Prince Edward Island, 164; Manitoba, 139, 
and Yukon, 14. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







O n the Atlantic Coast. = 

(Contributed by tbe Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



Initiative and Referendum. 



The writer has been asked by several read- 
ers of the Journal to explain what is meant 
by "direct legislation," or, as it is generally 
called, the Initiative and Referendum. In 
compliance with that request, we quote an 
article on the subject, from the October Ty- 
pographical Journal, as follows: 

Direct legislation is composed of two parts, the 
Initiative and the Referendum. If the Initiative 
were a part of the Constitution, then 10 per cent of 
the qualified voters of the State could sign a petition 
stating that they wanted a certain law enacted. 
Under the provisions of the Initiative, if the Legisla- 
ture refused or failed to pass such a law, it would be 
submitted to the vote of the whole people of the 
State. At the next general election it would be 
printed on all the ballots of every party; and all the 
voters of the State, irrespective of party, could vote 
"yes" or "no" on the question. If approved by a 
majority, it would become a law directly by that 
action of the people, and without the necessity of 
receiving the consent of the Legislature or the Gov- 
ernor. The law would then read: "Be it enacted by 
the Sovereign People of New York," instead of as at 
present, "Be it enacted by the Legislative Assembly 
of New York." 

The Referendum is another part of this system. 
With the Referendum in force, if the Legislature 
passed a law that was obnoxious to the people, or 
that the people considered unjust or oppressive; or 
if the Legislature gave away for little or nothing a 
valuable franchise which the people did not want to 
give away, then 10 per cent of the voters of the 
State could, within ninety days after the adjourn- 
ment of the Legislature, sign a petition demanding 
that the law be referred to the vote of the whole 
people of the State. The law in question would then 
be held in abeyance until voted upon at the next 
general election. If rejected by a majority of the 
voters, it would become null and void, and be marked, 
"Vetoed by the Sovereign People of New York." If, 
however, it was approved by a majority, then, and 
not before, would it become a law, and it would read, 
"Be it enacted by the Sovereign People of New York," 
etc. 

These two methods of procedure, the Initiative and 
the Referendum, constitute the system which has been 
named "direct legislation." This system does not 
aim at abolishing the representative form of gov- 
ernment we now have, or substituting another in its 
place. Neither does it mean that all laws shall be 
made directly by the people. It leaves our repre- 
sentative form of government just as it is, but guards 
it from abuse and from becoming misrepresentative. 
On great and important occasions the people will 
have the power to review the acts of their representa- 
tives, and to initiate, if necessary, legislation that 
the people need. 

The expense and labor necessary to get up the peti- 
tion will prevent its being invoked for any trivial 
reason. It takes away from the representatives the 
absolute uncontrolled power they now have, and 
brings them under the control of the people whose 
agents they are. It is absurd for us to give our 
legislative agents an absolute, irrevocable power of 
attorney to do what they like with our property 
during the term of their office. The Initiative and 
Referendum will make them the true responsible 
agents of the people, instead of the irresponsible 
masters they now are. And it will do so without 
increasing the number of our elections, or making 
them in any way more cumbersome or burdensome 
than at present. 

Any one can readily see by the foregoing state- 
ment that this system would practically put an end 
to the corruption that has invaded our political life. 
When we take away from our Legislatures the power 
to finally dispose of or sell anything without the 
leviewing vote of the people, then bribery will cease, 
because nobody will pay out money to those who can 
not make final delivery of the goods. When the acts 
of the Legislature are liable to be reviewed at any 
time by the people then the opportunities for rascal- 
ity and corruption will have passed away. The 



people, alone, will be able to make the final delivery 
of franchises, legislation, etc. 

With the Initiative and Referendum embodied in 
the Constitution workingmen could have laws en- 
acted which are now greatly needed. The question 
of child labor, for instance, would be solved, and the 
children kept in school instead of in the factories, 
mines and sweatshops. Legislators would heed the 
demands of labor, knowing that a refusal would be 
met with the Initiative and Referendum. 

An amendment incorporating direct legis- 
lation, as above outlined, into the Constitu- 
tion of the State of Missouri will be voted 
upon at the coming election in that State. 
Direct legislation has been in force in the 
State of Oregon for two years and has real- 
ized all that its advocates have claimed 
for it. 



De "World Do Move." 



The recent report of the Committee on 
Relations of Capital and Labor, appointed 
by the Episcopalian Convention, and of 
which Bishop Potter is Chairman, shows the 
drift of clerical opinion on labor matters. 
The church no doubt realizes that the trend 
of thought among modern workingmen is 
now so independent that unless it be duly 
recognized by the church, the latter will 
cease to be recognized by workingmen. 

As to the report itself, nothing but good 
can be said of it. It voices the sentiments 
of organized labor on nearly every impor- 
tant issue which that institution has raised 
and stands for. It is a satisfactory docu- 
ment, coming out, as it does, in a fair and 
manly way for principles dear to the hearts 
of all right-thinking men and women. Par- 
ticularly encouraging to organized labor is 
the paragraph which reads : 

We are convinced that the organization of labor is 
essential to the wellbeing of the working people. Its 
purpose is to maintain such a standard of wages, 
hours and conditions as shall afford every man an 
opportunity to grow in mind and in heart. Without 
organization the standard can not be maintained in 
the midst of our present commercial conditions. 

It is to be hoped that the report will prove 
the entering wedge to a better understand- 
ing and more cordial relations between the 
church and the working people. In the 
present state of man's spiritual development 
the church is a necessary institution ; but in 
its dealings with men it should not forget 
that all human intercourse is based upon, 
and dominated by, the principle of compro- 
mise. Workingmen will gladly concede the 
rights of the church if the church will con- 
cede the rights of workingmen. 



The leaning of the Government toward 
"free" labor is the natural correlative of its 
set policy of letting fat contracts to favored 
corporations. The ravages of extravagance 
in one direction must be repaired by the 
saving grace of retrenchment in another; 
and retrenchment, like motion, always fol- 
lows the line of least resistance, which, in 
the Government's case, happers to run in 
the direction of labor. What is bred by 
favoritism to the few will come out in rob- 
bery of the many. 



Shipping Notes. 

Ever since the "American Seamen's Fed- 
eration" began its noble mission of "uplift- 
ing" seamen, and rescuing them from the 
clutches of the Seamen's Union, there has 
been a notable increase in the number of 
West Indian negroes among the crews on 
coastwise vessels. During the winter months 
these men are not of much use. For in- 
stance, only the other day six of them had 
to be put ashore out of a vessel in the Dela- 
ware because they could not stand the cold, 
although the temperature was well above the 
freezing point. 

Secretary Frazier, of the Atlantic Coast 
Seamen's Union, on the 15th inst. addressed 
a large body of seamen in the chapel of the 
Boston Seamen's Friend Society on "The 
Present Status of Trade-Unionism among 
Seamen." Mr. Frazier went into an ex- 
haustive analysis of the causes underlying 
the movement, and comprehensively review- 
ed the principal events leading up to the 
formation of the present various bodies of 
organized seamen in America, and their af- 
filiation under the International Seamen's 
Union of America. Secretary Frazier was 
followed by Chaplain Steele, who spoke on 
the good work done by the Seamen's Legal 
Aid Society. Both gentlemen were fre- 
quently applauded. 

Secretary Sullivan, of the Marine Fire- 
men, reports shipping conditions in New 
York unchanged since last writing. The 
branches are doing well, however; particu- 
larly those at Boston, Philadelphia, Mobile 
and New Orleans. The increased activity in 
Philadelphia is mainly due to an extra num- 
ber of fruit steamers now running there, 
which formerly traded to Boston. The New 
Orleans branch is gradually taking the ship- 
ping away from the local men affiliated with 
the Longshoremen. Wages are $40 and $50, 
respectively, for coalpassers and firemen. In 
Mobile the situation is rather peculiar. The 
Norwegian owners of fruit steamers, so it 
appears, are willing to employ union seamen 
at union wages, but the American sharehold- 
ers are strenuously opposed to this, insisting 
that the crews be hired in Europe at the 
rate of wages prevailing there. These are 
of the gentlemen who, when talking for pub- 
lication, have so much to say about "encour- 
aging the employment of American seamen," 
etc. 



Don't be discouraged because there is still 
so much in the world which seems to need 
righting. All the beautiful order and or- 
ganization which we observe in the universe 
was originally evolved from chaos, and every 
political and civil right we now enjoy was 
preceded by some human wrong. 



Science is the handmaiden of Peace — and 
the mistress of War. 

(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKXAL. 



Home News. 

Former Governor George K. Nash, of 
Ohio, died suddenly at Columbus, 0., 
on October 28. 

Arizona will oppose union with New 
Mi \i: i, preferring t" remain a ['am 
tory indefinitely. 

The town of Gordon, Ala., was de 

stroyed bj fir i October 21 and 400 

inhabitants were rendered destitute. 

At the approaching election thirty 
States will elect Governors and Legisla- 
tures to choose United States Senators. 

The United States Court of' Appeals 
has affirmed the sentence upon men con 
mted in St. Louis of procuring fraud- 
ulent naturalization papers. 

The newly formed commission for the 
investigation of acute respiratory di^ 
eases met in New York recently to begin. 
a crusade against pneumonia. 

The son of Samuel Francis Smith, 
author of "America," was recent h sen- 
tenced at Davenport, la., to ten years 
in the penitentiary for embezzlement. 

The New York Court of Appeals has 
affirmed the right of the public schools 
in that State to exclude from attend- 
ance pupils who refuse to be vaccinated. 

An attorney for a private car line, in 
an investigation before the Interstate 
Commerce Commission recently, contend- 
ed that such concerns are not common 
carriers. 

An employment agent in the Michigan 
Soo has confessed that. Americans wen 
taken across the Canadian border and 
cast enough \otes to elect a Liberal to 
the Ontario Legislature. 

A delegation of Sioux Indians has 
sent to President Roosevelt a buffalo 

robe, with the authentic history of the 

Custer massacre done in picture writing 

from recitals of old chiefs. 

The monthly statement of collections 
of internal Revenue shows that for the 
month of September. 1904, the receipts 
wen' $20,007,253, an increase as 
pared with September, 1903, of $299, 
oil. 

American hankers have won a notable 
victory over foreign competitors in the 
award of the Mexican Government of an 
issue of $40,000,000 of bonds to a syn- 
dicate managed by Bpeyer & Co., of 
New York City. 

The United States War Department 

will ship free of charge from San Fran- 
cisco to Manila. P. [., such Christinas 
packages as reach the Superintendent of 
the Army Transport Service in San 

Francisco by December 1. 

A dispatch dated October 24, from 
Dawson, X. W. T.. says: Steam naviga- 
tion the full length of the Yukon is 
practically closed. The river is full of 
ice. The output for the Klondike this 
season is nine and one-half millions. 

The pamphlet report of the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company for the fiscal 
year ended June 30 last, issued on Octo- 
ber 21, shows: Gross earnings $55,279,- 
231, increase $4,204,042; operating ex- 
penses $29,020,007, increase $1,680,723, 
net earnings $26,252,624, increase $2,- 
,-.17.319. 

The total number of money orders is- 
sued by the Government during the last 
fiscal year passed the .^50,000,000 mark 
for the first time in history. The net 
revenue of the money order business was 
$2,528,403, an increase of $283,494, as 
compared with the previous fiscal year. 
The gro-s revenue was $3,020,676, an in 
crease of $376,282. 

The Xcw York Subway was opened on 
October 27. The Subway is nine miles 
in length, from the City Hall to One 
Hundred and Forty-fifth street and 
Broadway. The building of the struct- 
ure has occupied four and a half years, 
and the outlay for construction and 
equipment was sT5,000,000. Between 
7 p. m. and midnight on the opening 
day 125,000 persons traveled over the 
new line. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANT'S 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured for 

Seamen. 

TOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OOB GOODS ALSO 



lippmain bros. 

New Clothing Store 

Goods Direct from the Factory. 
UINIOIN STORE UINION GOODS 

>Vleld\v&Id Block, Front and Beacon Sts. 

SAIN PEDRO, CAL.. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

"Wholesale Dealer in the Choicest of Old Wines 

and Liquors 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at the lowest San Francisco prices. 
We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
a little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spending 
all you earn, but save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 
splendid opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San 
Francisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that. We offer you lots on 
graded streets with cement sidewalks and curbs, trees planted and water laid 
in, from $350 to $450, at the exceptionally easy terms of $25 cash and $10 
per month until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for 
your lot it will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity 
slip by, but see John Anderson, next door to the new postoffice. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



JOHN HELANDER 

— Dealer in — 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CIGARS 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 

San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beaeon Sis., San Pedro, Cal. 

— Dealers in — 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Herald and all San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 
Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

H. L. BRAND, Proprietor. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausage of all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by TJ. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 



FRED SYENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 
AND DRAY CO. 

8TAND AT FRONT 8TREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Headquarters for Pure Uruc". Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT STREET, OPP. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Q. W. HARVEY 

The old Time Expressman 

Solicits Your Patronage. 

Give Him a Call. 

Stand at Front St., San Pedro, Cal. 



People's Bargain Store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' FuriiishiiKi Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY. Proprietor. 

Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

1.1. IAS WEBERG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, 
Notions, Etc. 



S, W. Express 



HANS HENRIKSEN, Proprietor. 

Give your old Comrade a call 
when in San Pedro 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

— Dealer In — 

GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN, also GREEN 

FRUITS and COUNTRY PRODUCE 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL 



-OF TIIE- 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 
iictcRV stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label Is sewed 

^ ** ., .. ln It- The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 

four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
using them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Oranire, N. J, 
MARTIN UWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverl, place, Room 15, New York, N. y! 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc 

Union Label Goods 

POKT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union 
Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis. F. W. Elsenbels. 

EISENBEIS cc SON 

— Dealers in — 
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Crackers. 

Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
31(1 Water St. Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. 



Chas. E. Cood, Pres 



Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS 

IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest and 
fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

— Dealer in — 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Dealers in LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS and 

VEGETABLES. Wholesale and Retail. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cigar and Tobacco Store 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 334, 1'rop. 



TIIK BEST CIGARS IN TOWN. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

— Dealer ln — 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 
Front Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER 

FOURTH 8T. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



The following named seamen are in- 
quired for by the Consulate of Sweden 
and Norway at San Francisco: Harry 
Nilsen, from Asker ; Williaw Anderson, 
from Stockholm; Emil Swanson, from 
Gothenburg; E. G. Persson, from Goth- 
enburg; Johan Emil Engebrektson, from 
Gothenburg; George Nordstrom, from 
Christiania ; Jacob H. Oa 1 land, from 
Siglevik; Olof M. Nelson, from Sweden; 
Frithjof Ellingsen, from Drammen; Jo- 
hannes Gudmundsen, from Stavanger; 
K. A. Kolderup Wessel, from Chris- 
tiania; Johan Sander Peterson, from 
Brunnefjall; Ed. B. Herwan, from Stock- 
holm; Edwin Bredesen, from Chris- 
tiania; Gustav Hansen, from Aakenes; 
Martin Olsen, from Vatteroen; John E. 
VV. Johanson, from Kastlosa; F. M. Lof- 
berg, from Partille. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 




Pacific Coast Marine, 




A body identified as that of E. M. Nordberg, first- 
niate of the American ship St. Francis, was found 
floating in Tacoma (Wash.) harbor on October 31. 

The steamer Mandalay, well known on the Coast, 
has been purchased from the Simpson Lumber Com- 
pany by Hobbs, Wall & Co., and will be used in the 
Coast trade. 

The latest advices from the Arctic whalers reports 
that the Jeanette has a catch of nine whales, the 
Bowhead five, the William Baylies three, and the 
Narwhal four. 

Notice has been given that on or about November 
20 the whistle of the San Francisco light vessel off 
the bar will give blasts of two seconds' duration, 
separated by silent intervals of twenty-six seconds. 

The American ship McLaurin is reported to have 
been at Dutch Harbor, Alaska, on October 16. She 
had shipped a new rudder, and was preparing to 
repair her rigging and spars before sailing for San 
Francisco. 

The Puget Mill Company, of San Francisco, owning 
large sawmills at Port Gamble and Port Ludlow, 
Wash., has purchased an interest in the Puget Sound 
Tugboat Company and now controls that company 
absolutely. 

The steamer Mainlander, of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company's fleet was sunk on October 28 
in Puget Sound, off West Point lighthouse, four miles 
north of Seattle, in a collision with the tug Sea 
Lion. No lives were lost. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Company has appealed 
to the United States Supreme Court against the 
recent decision of the Circuit Court of Appeals deny- 
ing the Company's plea for limitation of liability in 
the case of the wrecked steamer City of Rio de 
Janeiro. 

The Miners' Protective Association of Chena, 
Alaska, has caused the seizure of the steamer Mon- 
arch on her arrival there to go into winter quarters. 
The Association makes a claim for $7,000 damages 
based on the failure of the steamer to deliver at 
Chena 100 tons of freight, which her owners had con- 
tracted to bring from St. Michael. 

Ninety-eight days have elapsed since the French 
bark Notre Dame d'Arvor left Newcastle, Aus., for 
San Francisco with a cargo of coal. Other vessels 
have lately made the passage in a month less time, 
and this fact causes some anxiety over the bark's ex- 
tremely long passage. If not heard from soon she 
will be posted on the overdue board. 

Bids for completing the Mare Island (Cal.) Navy 
Yard dry-dock were opened at the Navy Department 
oh October 30. The bids were: The Seofield Com- 
pany, of New York, $1,385,000; W. M. Concannon 
Company, of San Francisco, $1,420,000; Healy Tib- 
bitts & Co., San Francisco, $1,387,000; Burrell Con- 
struction Company, Oakland, Cal., $1,645,000. 

Laden with 6,300 pounds of whalebone, the gaso- 
line schooner Monterey, arrived at San Francisco on 
October 31, twenty-four days from the Arctic Ocean, 
and twenty days from Fox Island, under command 
of Captain Foley. On June 23 Antone Roderick, 
fourth-mate, was accidentally shot in the hand, as a 
result of which he died and was buried on Middleton 
Island. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 31: German ship Sirene, 154 
days from Liverpool for Valparaiso, 90 per cent; 
British ship Troop, 84 days from Manila for St. 
Helena, 25 per cent; French bark Bretagne, 143 days 
from Kobe for Taltal, 10 per cent; Italian bark Gae- 
tano Casabona, 131 days from Sydney for Table Bay, 
25 per cent. 

The first of the sperm whaling fleet to reach San 
Francisco, the bark Gayhead, arrived on October 26, 
twenty-six days from Behring Sea, with a catch of 
6,000 pounds of bone and 4550 barrels of oil. The 
Gayhead left San Francisco on March 25, and made 
no port during the voyage. Anton Merido, a Portu- 
guese seaman, died of consumption on April 25 off 
Kofiak Island and was buried at sea. 

The Pacific Coast Steamship Company has insti- 
tuted libel proceedings against the Puget Sound Tow- 
boat Company, owners of the tug Sea Lion, and the 
owners of the ship Celtic Monarch for $100,000 as a 
claim for the sinking of the Mainlander in the col- 
lision on October 28 between the former and the Sea 
Lion. The appellants also ask for $400 a day until 
the Mainlander can be replaced by another boat. 

The Canadian Pacific liner Empress of Japan, 
which sailed from Vancouver, B. C, on October 31 



for the Orient, refused to take freight beyond Yoko- 
hama. It is supposed the freight limitation is with 
the idea that her services might be needed in the 
Far East. The Canadian Pacific officials, however, 
state that the restrictive order is to permit the car- 
riage to Yokohama of the large quantity of cotton 
now waiting for transshipment. 

The Italian bark Gaetano Casabona is again posted 
as overdue. A few weeks ago she was listed at San 
Francisco and reinsurance quoted, but when the re- 
port was received that the vessel had reached her 
destination, Table Bay, from Sydney, her name was 
canceled. On October 27 advices were received that 
the first report was an error and that the Casabona 
is still at sea. She is out 132 days on the passage, 
which should have been finished by the Casabona a 
month or more ago. 

The whaling bark California, commanded by Cap- 
tain Joseph, and owned by William Louis & Co., of 
San Francisco, arrived at the latter port on October 
29, thirty-eight days from the Kurile Islands, on the 
Siberian coast. Her catch for the cruise amounted 
to only 820 barrels of sperm oil, all taken before 
reaching Hakodate, Japan, last July. Jesse Bean, a 
seaman, died of heart disease on Christmas, and was 
buried at sea. Deceased was a native of Denver, 
Col., aged twenty-five years. 

The Pacific Mail Company's freight steamer Algoa 
sailed' from San Francisco on October 31 for Japan 
and China with 10,000 tons of merchandise for the 
principal ports of those countries. The greater part 
of the cargo is consigned to Japan, and much of it 
i^ intended for Government use. Steel plates for 
warships' repairs or construction form a part of the 
freight. Much of the Algoa's cargo, too, may be 
classed as contraband, but no Russian warships are 
expected to molest the steamer during the trip. 

Captain Foley, of the schooner Monterey, at San 
Francisco on October 31, reports that up to Septem- 
ber 24 he had heard of the following catches: Steam- 
er Narwhal, two years in the Arctic, eighteen whales ; 
steamer Belvedere, one whale; steamer Alexander, 
one ; steamer Jeanette, ten ; steamer Karluk, two ; 
steamer William Baylies, seven; steamer Thrasher, 
four ; schooner Barbara Hernster, four ; steamer 
Bowhead, two; schooner Olga, one, and steamer Bel- 
uga, one. The Olga was reported to have reached 
Dutch Harbor on October 15. 

The bark Charles W. Morgan, oldest of the pictur- 
esque sperm-whaling fleet, arrived at San Francisco 
on October 30, from a long cruise in the Pacific. For 
sixty-three years the Morgan has sailed the seas and 
made millions of dollars for her various owners. As 
on many previous occasions, the Morgan returns now 
with a good catch, amounting to 1,450 barrels of 
sperm oil and 150 barrels of whale oil, the product 
of forty-six sperm and two right whales. Whalebone 
weighing 2,100 pounds was also part of the catch. 
Manuel Silva, a boatsteerer, died of consumption on 
last Christmas and was buried at sea. 

The British steamer Mexico, Captain Kennedy, ar- 
rived at San Francisco on October 29, fifteen days 
from Salinas Cruz, Mexico. She was taken direct 
to the Sixteenth-street dry-dock. The Mexico is a 
twin-screw sand dredger, and comes to San Francisco 
after having been engaged at Salinas .Cruz for the last 
fourteen months, to be extensively overhauled and 
repaired. She is a steel vessel of less than 600 tons 
register, but is fitted especially for sand or mud 
dredging, and has a capacity for 2,000 tons an hour, 
the debris being taken up entirely by suction. The 
steamer carries a crew of about sixty men. 

United States District Judge John J. De Haven, at 
San Francisco on October 28, handed down a decision 
limiting the liability of the North Pacific Coast Rail- 
road Company to $425 in the case of the suit of J. S. 
McClie for $300,000 damages for injuries suffered by 
the sinking of the steamer San Rafael November 29, 
1901, after a collision with the steamer Sausalito. 
This collision occurred during a fog and the owners 
petitioned for entire exemption from liability, but 
the Court stated that there was no evidence adduced 
to show that it was the result of an inevitable acci- 
dent. MeCue's suit does not fall to the ground, for 
the Court expressly stated that the decision had no 
reference to the Sausalito, against which the suit is 
also pending. The appraised value of the San Rafael 
and freight pending was adjudged to be only $425. 

DIED. 

Alek Hcikkela, No. 480, a native of Finland, aged 
42, died at Seattle, Wash., October 22, 1904. 

Ben Moore, No. 19, a native of Baltimore, Md., 
aged, 40, drowned .it San Pedro, Cal., October 27, 
1904. 

F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine 
law in this city. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Rooms S and 10, 508 California 
si net. Telephone Grant 163. 



Geo. E. Xalder, a member of the Sailors' Union, 
No. 555, is inquired for. Anyone knowing anything 
as to his present whereabouts please notify the 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



ww 

WW 






OFFICIAL 





SAIL0R5* UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 31, 1904. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., E. A. Erickson in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping dull. A donation of $25 was made 
to the striking telephone operators at Portland, Or. 
Voting for delegates to the International Seamen's 
Union of America convention was proceeded with. 

Notice — Nominations for officers for the ensuing 
term will be made at the next regular meeting held 
at Headquarters and agencies. 

A. Furusetii, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Bagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches, and 
the fronts -will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping dull ; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Red 208. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping dull ; prospects uncertain. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

Wm. Tiiorbeck, Agent. 
88 Vz Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. No. 443. 

Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping very quiet; prospects fair. 

Wm. Gohl, Agent. 
N. E. cor. F and Heron sts. P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 

Portland (Or.) Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. Paul, Agent. 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood No. 352. 

Eureka Agency, Oct. 23, 1904. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack; pros- 
pects poor. 

J. W. Ericksen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 327. 

San Pedro Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects medium. The revised 
Shipping Rules were adopted and Agent was in- 
structed to have same printed. 

H. Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 178. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 17, 1904. 
Situation unchanged. 

F. Larsen, Agent. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' 
ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 31, 1904. 
. The regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
8 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported situation unchanged. Voting for delegates to 
the ninth annual convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America was proceeded with. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 

Seattle Agency, Oct. 20, 1904. 
Shipping quiet; Nome vessels are laying up. 

R. Powers, Agent. 

San Pedro Agency, Oct. 20, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

•G. A. Lloyd, Agent. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
COAST AND ALASKA. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 28, 1904. 

Regular weekly meeting of the Fishermen's Pro- 
tective Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska was 
called to order at 8 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. 
Secretary reported that the trouble of the Pyramid 
Harbor men had been amicably settled. Voting for 
delegates to the convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America, and on the amendment of 
Article XII, Section B, was proceeded with. 

I. N. Hylen, Secretary. 

9 Mission st. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping slow ; prospects better. A normal supply 
of men ashore. 

V. A. Olander, Secretary pro tern. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Providence (R. I.) Agency, Oct. 26, 1904. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

James Wilson, Agent. 



New York (N. Y.) Agency, Oct. 24, 1904. 
Shipping very dull. 

John Corbett, A 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 21, 1904. 
Shipping slow: prospects fair. All Branches doing 
well except Baltimore. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's 
Journal 



Published Weekly by 
THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W.MACARTHUR. . .Editor | P. SCHARRENBERQ, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail, - $2.00 | Six months, - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday noon 
of each week. 

To insure a prompt riply correspondents should address 
all communications of a business nature to the Business 
Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second-class 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, south- 
west corner East and Mission streets, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the Journal provided they are of general interest, 
brief, legible, written on one side only of the paper, and 
accompanied by the writer's name and address. The 
Journal is not responsible for the expressions of cor- 
respondents, nor for the return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



NOVEMBER 2, 1904. 



THESE CANDIDATES SAY "YES." 

The San Francisco Labor Council, through 
its Law and Legislative Committee, ae,ting 
under tlie guidance of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, recently submitted certain 
questions to the candidates for election to 
Congress and the Legislature. These ques- 
tions are as follows: 

Question No. 1. — If elected will you actively assist 
in enacting legislation for the termination of "Gov- 
ernment by Injunction," the details of the measure 
to be those of the Anti-Injunction bill in Congress, 
;i copy of which we inclose? 

Question No. 2. — If elected will you actively assist 
in passing legislation for an eight-hour day in Gov- 
ernment contract work, the details of the measure to 
be those which have been presented in the bill in 
Congress, a copy of which we inclose? 

Question No. 3. — Will you, if elected, vote to im- 
mediately establish in the nation an efficient system 
whereby the people may instruct their national repre- 
sentatives, the system to consist of the advisory Ini- 
tiative and advisory* Referendum until a Constitu- 
tional amendment can be brought forward under the 
people's initiative and acted upon; the details of the 
advisory system to conform to the measures we here- 
with inclose, subject to such minor changes as may 
be agreed to by the Legislative Committee of the 
American Federation of Labor and National Grange? 
Bear in mind that a refusal to promise to vote for an 
efficient system whereby the people may instruct their 
representatives will be a tlat-footed and open repu- 
diation of the people's right to self-government. 

Question No. 4. — If the people of this District 
select you as their agent in the House of Representa- 
tives, will you vote as they by referendum ballot may 
instruct? 

The foregoing interrogatories deal with 
matters concerning which every man in pub- 
lic life, and every man having any reasonable 
aspirations to enter the public service, is 
quite familiar. Consequently, the candidates 
were requested to return a straightforward 
answer — in a word, to say "Yes" or "No." 

As a result of the Labor Council's in- 
quiries, the following candidates have an- 
swered "Yes" to all four questions: 

For Congress — 

E. J. Livernash (Dem.-U. L.) 4th District 

W. J. Wynn (Dem.) 5th 

J. C. Williams (U. L.) 5th 

W. ( ). Morton (Dem.) 7th 

W. F. Lucas (Dem.) 8th 



For State Senate — 

Jos. M. Plunkett (Dem.) 17th District 

Richard J. Welch (Rep.-U. L.) 21st 

A C. Haskin (Soc.) 21st 

Abner M. McMahon (Dem.) 23d " 

For State Assembly — 

Wm. Mindham (Rep.-U. L.) 28th District 

S. B. Nolan (Dem.) 28th 

C. E. Hallenquist (Soc.) 28th 

John A. Cullen (Rep.-U. L.) 29th 

Patrick Moriarty (Dem.) 29th " 

Francis MeNamara (Rep.) 30th " 

Ed. J. Twomey (Dem.) 30th 

Timothy J. Kenney (Dem.) 31st " 

Patrick J. Boyle (Rep.) 32d 

Geo. L. Flanagan (Dem.) 32d " 

John J. Hennessey (U. L. ) 32d " 

Mathew J. Kerrigan (Dem.-U. L.) 33d 

Fred. E. Dean (Soc.) 33d 

E. J. Deaver (U. L.) 36th 

Jeremiah H. Dillon (Dem.-U. L.) 37th 

Joseph Brachman (U. L. ) 38th " 

Ed. Kirwan ( U. L. ) 42d " 

W. E. Farnham (Dem.) 42d " 

Mel. Vogel (Rep.) 44th " 

Joseph Silva ( Dem. ) 45th " 

The replies received from these candidates 
place them squarely upon record as favoring 
legislation that is urgently needed by the 
people. The voters should therefore discrim- 
inate in favor of these candidates, as against 
those of their opponents who have failed to 
reply or, replying, have evaded the issue in 
one way or another. Putting all legal pre- 
text and moral sophistry to one side, the ani- 
mating motive of those candidates who have 
failed to return a frank reply to the Labor 
Council's questions is simply the desire to 
be free to vote as they please — that is, as 
their bosses please — ujxm matters affecting 
the public welfare. The candidate who has 
failed to answer "Yes" or "No" to these ques- 
tions has thereby placed himself squarely on 
record as against the people, lie that is not 
with us is against us. The shifty politician 
should be elected — to stay at home and look 
after the women and children ! 



By reference to the report of the British 
Trade-Union Congress, published on page 2 
of this issue, it will he seen that the organized 
workers of Great Britain still maintain a 
solid front against compulsory arbitration, 
occupying in this, as in most other respects, 
the same position as that held by the trade- 
unionists of the United States and Canada. 
From a detailed account of the proceedings 
we learn that Delegate Whitefield, of the 
Miners' Union, made a particularly effective 
plea against the proposal of Ben Tillett, de- 
claring that it would be dangerous to take 
away the workers' right to strike while no 
minimum wage had been fixed by the State. 
In other words, it would be dangerous to 
extend the powers of the Government while 
the latter refused to exercise the powers al- 
ready vested in it for the benefit of the whole 
people. Delegate Cummings, General Sec- 
retary of the Boilermakers, opposed the reso- 
lution on the ground that the members of his 
craft in New Zealand had suffered under the 
compulsory arbitration system in vogue in 
the latter country. Those who understand 
the practical workings of compulsory arbi- 
tration will have no hesitancy in approving 
the judgment of those labor bodies which 
reject that scheme of "settling" the labor 
question by the simple expedient of suppress- 
ing it — by denying labor the right to ask any 
questions at all. 



FOR JAPANESE EXCLUSION'. 



The question of Japanese Exclusion has 
assumed a more pressing aspect as a result 
of the war in the Orient. That the whole 
question of the relations between Japan and 
the United States is undergoing a change in 
the public mind may be gathered from con- 
servative newspaper opinion, a sample of 
which, as reprinted in the Literary Digest, is 
here quoted : 

Army and navy officers who have recently returned 
from the Philippines and the China station report 
that at present the Japanese have not a friend in 
the East among mercantile, military, or naval men 
of white extraction. Their success has made them 
insufferably overbearing and insolent. They implic- 
illy believe that their army and navy are invincible, 
and give their view3 publicity in a manner which is 
galling. Their total disregard of the truth, their 
apparent inability to conceive that there is anything 
sacred about a promise or agreement, and the barbar- 
ism which is so clearly apparent through their 
veneer of politeness and civilization have irritated 
and alienated all who have come in contact with 
them. The disillusion of the pro-Japanese corre- 
spondents who flocked to Tokio early in the year is 
an old story. 

In Manila and the Philippines generally the steady 
successes of the Japanese are viewed with disfavor 
and some concern. It was well understood that the 
Japanese supplied munitions of war to the insurgents 
on very favorable terms, and that there was more 
than mere commercialism behind the aid given the 
Filipinos. It is believed that a number of Japanese 
officers under leave of absence served with Aguinaldo's 
forces. 

That Japan resents our occupation of the Philip- 
pines is well known. A naval officer tells a story 
which shows the attitude of the Japanese on this 
matter in a strong light. While several Japanese 
ships were in the harbor of Manila before the out- 
break of the present war a number of our officers 
were invited to a dinner on board the Japanese flag- 
ship. To the astonishment of the American officers 
the younger Japanese officers discussed quite freely 
our position in Manila. They showed a remarkable 
knowledge of the fortifications, and the disposition 
of our troops ; they had exact data as to the length 
of time it would take a fleet of ours to reach those 
waters, and gleefully declared that there was not a 
gun on the island that they could not silence in fifteen 
minutes, and that we could not assemble a fleet large 
enough to prevent them from landing 200,000 men on 
Luzon within two weeks after the order to mobilize 
was given. They also announced that Japan would 
never wait for a formal declaration of war to strike 
an enemy. * * • 

There are several places where friction between 
Japan and the United States might arise. The Phil- 
ippine and Sandwich islands are the most dangerous. 
It will be remembered that Japan once sent a cruiser 
to Honolulu to back up complaints of ill treatment 
of her subjects. In the Balmon-flshing country there 
has been much trouble with the Japanese. 

In the navy it is generally believed that we will 
have In meet Japan's fleets on the Pacific before the 
century is old. 

These observations, although dealing exclu- 
sively with the military problems of the situa- 
tion, have a more or less direct bearing upon 
the question of Japanese Exclusion, consider- 
ed as a purely industrial question. In the first 
place, it seems obvious that the prospects of 
a conflict between this country and Japau 
are, and must continue to be, aggravated in 
proportion to the extent to which Japanese 
competition with Americans continues and 
increases. Opinion among the press may, 
and in fact does, differ on the subject of 
Japan's present and prospective attitude to- 
ward the United States • but no thinking per- 
son will scout the views expressed in the fore- 
going quotation, since these views conform 
with the teachings of history. Whatever 
thoughts or wishes one may indulge regard- 
ing the outcome of a test of military strength 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



between the two nations, no good citizen will 
hesitate to choose the honorable and sensible 
way out of the threatened danger. The 
finger-post to peace points in the direction 
of Exclusion, as a measure, if not of absolute 
assurance, at least of greatly lessened risk. 
A continuance of the present rate of Japan- 
ese immigration to the United States, leaving 
aside the probability of an increase therein, 
will result inevitably in a serious strain upon 
international relations. 

The "Yellow Peril" of the present is not 
a matter affecting the United States suprem- 
acy in the Philippines or Hawaii ; it is a 
matter that lies much nearer home. Whether 
Japan or the United States shall have and 
hold the islands of the Pacific is of little 
moment — of no moment at all, in fact — com- 
pared to the matter of control in American 
industry. If the Japanese decide, as they 
probably have already done, that there is 
not room for two Yankees in the Orient, the 
Americans must recognize that there is not 
room for two Yankees in these Western 
fields. The Oriental and Occidental races 
are antipathetical. The present war has 
demonstrated that the Japanese has no re- 
spect for human life, that he lives only to 
die for his Emperor ; it has shown us the 
unlovely spectacle of a man put to death be- 
cause he wept at parting from his new-made 
wife. American history shows us that 
American manhood esteems human life 
above everything except honor, and that the 
latter is dedicated, not to king, president or 
emperor, but to hearth, home and family. 
This difference in racial characteristics 
makes the Japanese a slave in peace and a 
slaughterman in war, while it makes the 
American a hero in the industrial struggle 
for the glorification of human love and the 
advancement of human liberty. For these 
and other reasons, Japanese Exclusion is the 
imperative need of the hour. 



The spirit of combination for any purpose 
presupposes mutual understanding and 
agreement upon all material points. The 
understanding among the members of a given 
trade concerning the conditions thereof and 
their agreement as to methods of improving 
these, constitute the basic element of strength 
in the trade-union which confines itself to 
purely economic effort, just as the difference 
of opinion concerning political questions 
constitutes the element of weakness in the 
trade-union which attempts to combine poli- 
tics and economics. 



The proposition to issue bonds in the sum 
of $2,000,000 for the extension of the sea- 
wall of San Francisco, also Constitutional 
Amendment 'No. 11 (designated No. Ill on 
the ballot), to exempt the shipping of Cali- 
fornia from taxation, are matters of great 
importance to the future of the whole State, 
and should be supported by the voters, with- 
out regard to class or locality. 



Help the union cigarmakors in their strug- 
gle against Chinese and tenement-house prod- 
ucts, by demanding the label (printed in 
light blue) of the Cigarmakers' International 
Union ! 



The Eastern delegates to the convention 
of the American Federation of Labor will 
leave Chicago by special train on November 
9, arriving in San Francisco on the after- 
noon of Sunday, the 13th. Arrangements 
for the reception of the visitors are now prac- 
tically complete, giving assitrance of a gen- 
erous welcome and entertainment. Head- 
quarters of the Federation will be located at 
the Puss House, whence all mail, official and 
personal, should be addressed. 



The comparatively slow growth of the 
labor movement may be largely accounted for 
by the failure of its members to keep in view 
the real nature of that movement, and par- 
ticularly to recognize the difference between 
it and other movements. In other words, the 
growth of the labor movement has been re- 
tarded by attempts to engraft upon it func- 
tions peculiarly the property of other move- 
ments. 



Public sympathy is a valuable, and in- 
deed a necessary, element in the work of 
trade-unionism. Because of that fact, the 
trade-union refuses to prejudice its case by 
committing itself to the policy of political 
action, which, in the nature of things, would 
tend to unite the public against it. 



The man or woman who knows trade- 
unionism best loves and respects it most. 
Only the man or woman who has been 
"through trade-unionism" in the sense that 
the lout went "through college"- — in at one 
door and out at the other — affects to regard 
that institution as a "failure." 



The question, so often addressed to the 
trade-unionist by the "progressive" reform- 
er, "If you can't win by the strike, why not 
use the ballot ?" is a very simple one, to be 
sure ; as simple as the question, "If you come 
to a stream, and can't swim, why not fly V 



Do your shopping early — and look for the 
"store card" of the Retail Clerks' Union ! 



For union label and other fair products of 
all kinds, see Journal ad columns. 



Law of the Labor Move- 
ment. 



(Continued from page 2.) 



are not large enough to carry forward the labor 
movement of to-day, and the reason for this becomes 
obvious with a little reflection on the nature of 
modern production. The invention of new machinery 
and the improvement in technical processes have 
weakened the position of unions composed exclusively 
of mechanics of a single trade. * * * Take the 
case of printers ; men are now endeavoring to invent 
a typesetting machine, which will place this skill 
among other useless acquirements. Should they suc- 
ceed, it is not easy to see of what use the Internation- 
al Typographical Union could be to its members, 
unless it should indeed change its character, enlarge 
its scope and enter into closer connection with other 
labor organizations. Now the order of the Knights of 
Labor was founded with a perception of these facts, 
and those who originated it, and have given to it its 
animus, have sought to organize a society which 
should embrace all branches of skilled and unskilled 
labor, for mutual protection, for the promotion of 
industrial and social education among the masses, 
and for the attainment of beneficent public and 
private reforms. There is provided room within the 
order for separate trade-unions, with their own rules 
and regulations, united by a Federal tie, as well as, 
for those outside of any unions. 



These views were penned nearly twenty years ago. 
In the interval the typesetting machine has been 
invented and generally introduced. The Interna- 
tional Typographical Union has met the issue of 
"jurisdiction" thereby raised, but without "changing 
its character." Who shall say that that organization 
is not to-day of as much use to its members as ever 
it was, that it is not, in fact, the very bulwark of 
the printers and a tower of strength to the labor 
movement at large? In the same interval we have 
seen the Knights of Labor rise to great proportions 
and then fall to complete ruin because, like the frog 
in the fable, it expanded beyond its natural dimen- 
sions. 

"History repeats itself." "Like causes produce like 
e fleets." Unless the American Federation of Labor 
be guided by history, unless it remain true to the 
principles upon which it was founded, it will go the 
way of its predecessors. The Federation is more 
powerful than any of its predecessors; but it has 
attained its power by avoiding the mistakes of the 
latter. Should the Federation repeat these mistakes 
its power will pass away under the inexorable decrees 
of fate. Neither the Federation nor any other form 
of association among men need ever hope to be strong 
enough to violate the natural law of "association in 
equality," and escape the consequences. 

If the Federation is to endure, it must continue to 
respect and conserve the equality of its parts, that is, 
the equality of each trade-union in all matters of 
trade interest. The trade, not the industry, is still 
the unit of organized labor's forces, and will con- 
tinue to be as long as members of a given trade con- 
tinue to be employed in different industries. Destroy 
the trade unit, and you destroy trade-unionism! 

Unnatural ambition within the American Federa- 
tion of Labor is the greatest danger now confronting 
that organization. Opposition from the outside is 
natural, and to be expected. Such opposition, prop- 
erly understood and intelligently met, is to be wel- 
comed rather than deplored, since it will thus inspire 
the greater loyalty and shed the better light among 
the organized workers. Trade-unionism has nothing 
to fear from its enemies. Well may we pray for 
courage and good counsel in the house of our friends ! 

In passing this subject for the present, we would 
bespeak the thoughtful consideration of the reader 
toward these words of President Gompers, addressed 
to the Boston convention of last year, as follows: 

The trade-unions are the natural movement of the 
wage-earners to protect and advance their interests. 
The workers of the craft or calling associate the bet- 
ter to protect and promote these interests. 

The alliance or federation of the trade-unions is 
intended to protect and advance the class interests of 
all those lines with which it is difficult for the single 
trade-union to cope. 

The attempt to force the trade-unions into what 
has been termed industrial organization is perversive 
of the history of the labor movement, runs counter 
to the best conceptions of the toilers' interests now, 
and is sure to lead to the confusion which precedes 
dissolution and disruption. It is time for the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor to call a halt. It is time 
for our fellow unionists intrusted with the grave 
responsibilities to help stem the time of expansion 
madness lest either by their indifference or encour- 
agement their organizations will be drawn into the 
vortex that will engulf them to their possible dis- 
memberment and destruction. There is virtue and a 
great meed of praise due in organizing our fellow- 
workers that they may defend and further their in- 
terests. 

No tribute too great can be paid those engaged in 
the past and in the present who have done and who 
are doing this splendid work; but virtue, merit, and 
tribute must be effaced unless we meet the conditions, 
aye, the awful calamity which is inevitable if trade- 
union lines are not recognized and enforced — enforced 
not so much by an edict of this Federation, but by 
the common sense and power of the organizations 
themselves. * * * 

We should bear in mind that in our labor move- 
ment we are not building simply for the day in which 
we live; we are building for all time to come, if we 
but build wisely. The trade-union movement is the 
historic development of the wage-earners' struggle for 
fairer conditions of life, for right, and for justice. 
That movement has stood the test of time. It has 
secured for the workers the vantage ground they now 
occupy. To strengthen that movement, yet keep it as 
near as possible to the lines upon which it has dem- 
onstrated its usefulness and capacity; to bring about 
a still closer federation among the distinctive organ- 
ized international trade-unions; to help bear each 
others burdens ; to be helpful to each other in every 
viscissitude and effort for labor's disenthrallment; 
these will not only encourage the yet unorganized to 
unite with us, but more firmly cement the conscious- 
ness of solidarity and the bond of fraternity in the 
American Federation of Labor; that each interna- 
tional union, that is, each wing in the grand army 
of labor, will itself feel more self-reliant, and all feel 
more greatly interdependent, the whole phalanx sure- 
ly gaining day after day and year after year until 
we shall be invulnerable in peace, unconquerable in 
contest, indubitable in the fulfillment of our mission 
in the establishment of good will among men. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The Mother-in-Law. 



In glancing over the Sunday paper our eye 
saughl by the following paragraph in a 
dispatch from < iharlotte, X. C. : 

"The bond of Major Breese, for the sum 
of $15,000, was tendered and accepted. The 
Ik. ml i> signed by the mother-in-law of Major 
Breese and the mother-in-law of his son. The 
case will lie carried before the Circuit Court 
of Appeals at the November term." 

Who Major Breese is is really immaterial, 
but it may satisfy the reader to know that he 
was recently convicted of misappropriating 
the funds dC the Firsl National Bank of Ash 
ville and sentenced to seven years in the 
United States Penitentiary. The significant 
point about the brief paragraph is the con- 
nection in which the term "mother-in-law" is 
twice employed. 

It seems there is a use for her, after all. 
In spite of the continual turning of the same 
joke by comic papers, there are times when 
-lie comes in very well, not only one's own 
mother-in law, hut that of one's son. Her 
sole mission is not, as they would have as be- 
lieve, to till the daughter's ear with shrewd 
counsel that causes her to draw apart from 
her husband with distrust, and to make 
things generally so uncomfortable that a 
man's dreams of heaven insensibly assume 
the shape of a cozy bachelor apartments. 

The truth is the little paragraph we have 
quoted is eloquent with suggestion to the 
misguided human beings who persist in mis- 
representing the true functions of the moth- 
er-in-law. It really represents her in the 
attitude she usually occupies to her son-in- 
law and her son's family. She is more 
frequently an aid than a drawback, and the 
counsels of her experience are invaluable to 
a couple embarked on the uncharted sea of 
matrimony. 

This is probably the view most men take 
of the matter. But the humorists are, and 
will continue to be, incorrigible, for the 
hoary jest is meat and drink to them. It 
may be that with the lapse of time the saner 
view will prevail that the mother-in-law is 
not to be wholly condemned without a hear- 
ing, and they will be forced, for want of an 
audience, to cease using her as a butt for 
their witticisms. When that day does come 
we expect to see them dropping off by scores 
from Brooklyn Bridge, and, mayhap, a few 
jumping from the New Orleans ferry, to find 
in death the cure of their despair. 

Of course, mother-in-laws are not like 
whisky — all good. There are good ones and 
bad ones, and the luck of him who draws one 
of the former species is needed to set off the 
misfortune- of one who secures a specimen 
of the latter. Hut as a class they have de- 
served well of the country, and it is really 
getting time, now that the zest of the joke 
has gone from us forever, to make public 
acknowledgment of it. As for the average 
married man, he began his wedded bliss with 
the greatest of all compliments to her — the 
espousal of her daughter; and there seems 



no particular reason why the first should be 
the last compliment she need expect to re- 
ceive from her devoted son-in-law. — New 
Orleans Times-Democrat. 



A New Torpedo-Boat. 



In a torpedo-boat recently constructed in 
England a striking innovation has been made 
in combining steam turbines with an ordin- 
ary reciprocating engine, the object being 
to secure economy at low speeds and high 
efficiency when the maximum speed is de- 
manded. In the vessel, which is of the or- 
dinary design otherwise, there are three 
shafts, to each of which one propeller is tit- 
led. The reciprocating engine, which has 
an indicated horsepower of 250, drives the 
center shaft at a speed of about 450 revolu- 
tions per minute, a rate sufficient to obtain a 
speed of about ten knots per hour. The two 

side shafts are driven by turbines, whicl u- 

sume about 1,750 horsepower and make 
about 1,200 revolutions per minute, so that 
a speed of twenty-five knots per hour is ob- 
tained. The arrangement is considered to 
represent the most efficient method of using 
the -team turbine on a torpedo-boal designed 

for high speed, but it is thought to he an 
open question whether the superiority of the 
turbine over the usual machinery in such 
vessels has been demonstrated. Further 
tests of the arrangement are expected on the 
trial of a new French torpedo-boat, with en- 
gines somewhat similar, and, by comparison 
with those where turbines alone, and recip- 
rocating engines, have been used, .should 
show just what kind of engines are most use- 
ful for this important class of war vessel. — 
Harper's Weekly. 



Hundred-Year Rules. 



Sir James Sawyer, an English physician, 

has formulated the following nineteen rules 
for prolonging life to LOO year-: 

1. Eight hours' sleep. 

2. Sleep on your right side. 

3. Keej) your bedroom window open all 
night. 

4. Have a mat to your bedroom door. 

5. Do not have your bedstead against the 
wall. 

6. No cold tub in the morning, but a bath 
at the temperature of the body. 

7. Exercise before breakfast. 

8. Eat little meat and see that it is well 
cooked. 

9. (For adults.) Drink no milk. 

10. Eat plenty of fat, to feed tin cells, 
which destroy disease germs. 

11. Avoid intoxicants, which destroy 
those cells. 

12. Daily exercise in the open air. 

13. Allow no pet animals in your living 
room. They are apt to cany about disease 
germs. 

14. Live in the country if you can. 

157 Watch the three D's — drinking wa- 
ter, damp and drains. 

16. Have a change of occupation. 

17. Take frequent and short holidays. 



Trip to the Moon. 



How would you like to take a trip to the 
moon? It would be a long journey, taking 
more than six months if you went with the 
speed of an express train; or if you traveled 
with the swiftness of a ball from a modern 
cannon, it would take about as long as a trip 
across the Atlantic in a fast steamer. Under 
average atmospheric conditions, a large tele- 
scope gives us a view of the moon as it 
would be without the telescope at a distance 
of 800 miles from us. 

The necessary outfil for the journey must 
be much more extensive than for any trip 
on earth, even the trip to the North Pole. 
There will be no chance "to live off the coun- 
try." In addition to warm clothing and 
food, yon mu-t carry with you all you need 
to drink, and the problem of keeping it from 
freezing, or thawing it out if fro/en, will not 
be an easy one to solve. There i- practically 
no air on the moon, and you must take along 
a supply for breathing. If you expect to 

find a tire ami < k your dinner you must 

take, in addition to fuel, an additional sup- 
ply of air to keep your tire going. 

lint BUppose that in some way you are 

landed on the moon with a supply of things 

-ary for sustaining life. If you are on 

a part of the i n on which the -mi is shin- 

ing you will marvel, perhaps, firsl of all, at 
the dazzling brilliance of the sunlight and 
the intense blackness of the shadows. Every- 
thing in the shade will be in almost total 
darkness, as there is no air filled with little 
dust particles to scatter the sunlight so that 
it may illuminate the places OUl of the direct 
path of its ray.-. 

And what a sense of desolation will pre- 
sent itself to your view! The Desert of Sa- 
hara would look like a luxuriant park in 
comparison with the lunar landscape. Not 
a blade of grass, nor a tree, or brook, or lake 
— nothing but a vast stony silent desert. 
There are plain-, not quite a- level as our 
Western prairies, and great numbers of 
mountains, most of them much steeper than 
those on earth; they are not grouped in long 
ranges, as our terrestrial mountains gener- 
ally are, but are scattered all over the sur- 
face, singh and in irregular groups. Most 
of them are shaped more or less like our ter- 
restrial volcanoes, and they probably were 
volcanoes ages ago. before the moon cooled 
off. 

If you happen to land on the part of the 
moon where it is early morning, you will 
have plenty of time for explorations before 
night comes on. The sun rise- and sets as 
it does on the earth, but the time between 
sunrise and sunset i^ nearly fifteen of our 
days. Then during the long iunar night our 
earth will act like the moon, and will give 

light upon that part of the n u's Surface 

which is turned toward it. Only there will 
be this curious difference; it will not rise 
and set, but will remain nearly stationary 
in the same region of the sky. From the 
side of the moon which is always turned 
away from us the earth, of course, can never 
be seen at all. — St. Nicholas. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Sailor's Feathered Friend. 



Of all the strange creatures seen by trav- 
elers, not the least interesting is the wander- 
ing albatross. This great feathered wan- 
derer, sometimes measuring seventeen feet 
from tip to tip of his wings, will follow a 
ship for davs at a time. Some travelers and 
sailors declare that they have seen a par- 
ticular bird fly for weeks at a time without 
ever being seen to alight upon the waves. 
It not merely follows the ship, but wheels 
in great circles around and above here, high 
in the air, as if to show that it is not tired. 
Sometimes the bird will be seen to hang in 
the air with its wings apparently motionless, 
find the sailors say that then it is asleep. Not 
only in pleasant weather will the albatross 
follow a ship for days and weeks, but through 
the most terrific storms it will continue its 
untiring flight. In fact, to find an albatross 
otherwise than on the wing is like finding a 
weasel asleep. 

Once a year the female albatross flies away 
a few thousand miles to the great lonely 
island rock of Tristan d'Ancunha, which lifts 
its desolate head far in the South Atlantic, 
or to some equally remote place, and there 
lays one egg in the hollow of a rock. The 
albatross has always been a bird of mystery, 
and in ancient times the people believed that 
these unwearying seabirds were the' compan- 
ions of the Greek warrior Diomedes, who 
were said to have been changed into birds 
at the death of their chief. When America 
was discovered ami ships began to sail abroad 
to the Pacific Ocean, to double the Cape of 
Good Hope and to explore the ''seven seas" 
generally, the old belief about the albatross 
bad been forgotten by the sailors and explor- 
ers, but in their long and lonesome voyages 
over the waters which Avere cut by no keel 
but their own, and upon whose vast expanse 
they saw no other sail, the presence of the 
albatross following the ship day after day 
became a great source of comfort and com- 
panionship. So it came to be a belief that 
ill-luck would follow any one who killed one 
of these birds, and that belief is common 
among seafaring men to this very day. Col- 
eridge's famous "Rime of the Ancient Mari- 
ner" is based upon this belief. Although the 
superstition about the killing of an albatross 
bringing bad luck is only a foolish one, it 
has served its useful purpose for many years 
in preventing the slaughter of these beauti- 
ful and gallant birds — the sailors' friends 
and the landsmen's wonder. — Chicago Jour- 
nal. 



Railroad Employes. 



Swedish Emigration. 



To put a stop to emigration to America, 
the Swedish Government has secured the pas- 
sage of a homestead law, providing a fund of 
10,000,000 crowns, which for the next four 
years is at the disposal of farm laborers who 
wish to borrow at the rate of 3.6 per cent 
interest for the purpose of buying farms and 
making homes thereon. Only Swedish labor- 
ers, known to be frugal .and industrious, are 
allowed the privilege of borrowing. It is 
assumed that the effect of this liberal law will 
be to induce the Swedes to stay at home and 
develop the agricultural resources of the 
country. 



"We Don't Patronize. 



The number of persons on the pay rolls 
of the railways in the United States, as re- 
turned for June 30, 1903, was 1,312,537, 
or 639 per 100 miles of line. These fig- 
ures, when compared with corresponding 
ones for the year 1002, show an increase 
of 123,222 in the number of employes, or 
45 per 100 miles of line. The classification 
of employes includes enginemen, 52,993; 
firemen, 56,011 ; conductors, 39,741, and 
other trainmen, 104,885. There were 49,961 
switch tenders, crossing tenders and watch- 
men. With regard to the four general divi- 
sions of railway employment it appears that 
general administration required the services 
of 45,222 employes; maintenance of way and 
structures, 433,648 employes; maintenance 
of equipment, 253,889 employes, and con- 
ducting transportation, 576,881 employes. 
This statement disregards a few employes of 
which no assignment was made. 

The usual statement of the average daily 
compensation of the eighteen classes of em- 
ployes for a series of years is continued in 
the present report, which shows also the ag- 
gregate amount of compensation paid to more 
than 97 per cent of the number of employes 
for the year 1903 and more than 99 per cent 
for the six years preceding. The amount 
of wages and salaries paid to employes dur- 
ing the year ending June 30 1903, as re- 
ported, was $757,321,415; but this amount, 
as compared with the total reported for the 
year 1902, is understated for want of re- 
turns by $18,000,000 at least,— Report of 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY 

HEAIXIUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 
Union of America) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone 1321 Monroe 

BRANCHES 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295 

TOLEDO, 1702 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762 
AGENCIES 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 Easi Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615 

BAY CITY. MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL. ...138 Ninety-second Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago 
SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS 

UNITED STATICS MARINE HOSPITALS 
CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Manitowoc. Wis. 

Buffalo, N. Y. M;u<iuette, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. .Milwaukee, Wis. 

Br i e p a , S.iejnaw. Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

i;i, ,,, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Wis, Sheboj k Midi. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludington, Mich. Superior. Wis. 

Manistel, Mich. Toledo, O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman, New York City; Kerbs, 
Wertheim & Schiffer, New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby, Milling Company, Min- 
neapolis. Minn.; Kelley Milling Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 

CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, la.; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rocester, N. Y. ; Strawbridge 
& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner Bros., New 
York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt <ind Collar Com- 
pany, Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, 
N. Y.; Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James 
R. Kaiser, New York City. 

Shoes — Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thos. 
Taylor & Son, Hudson, Mass.; Harney Bros., Lynn, 
Mass. 
Suspenders — Russell Manufacturing Company, Mid- 
dletown, Conn. 

Textile — Merrimac Manufacturing Company (print- 
ed goods), Lowell, Mass. 
Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica, N. Y. 
Woolens — Hartford Carpet Company, Thompson- 
ville, Conn.; J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 

PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Company, Chicago, 111. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Company, publishers, 
Hammond, Ind.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; 
Times, Los Angeles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS AND STONE. 

Pottery and Brick — J. B Owens Pottery Company, 
Zanesville, O.; Northwestern Terra Cotta Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111.; Terre Haute Brick and Pipe 
Company, Terre Haute, Ind.; Evans & Howard 
Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick Company, St. Louis, 
Mo.; C. W. Stine Pottery Company, White Cot- 
tage, O.; Harbison-Walker Refractory Company, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Presscott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, Aetna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Davis Sewing Ma- 
chine Company, Dayton, O.; Computing Scale Com- 
pany, Dayton, O.; Iver Johnson Arms Company, 
Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Company, Syr- 
acuse, N. Y. ; Brown & Sharpe Tool Company, 
Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Company, 
Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass.; Hohmann & Maurer Manufacturing 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. ; Henry Disston & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.; American Hardware Company, 
New Britain, Conn. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Ni- 
agara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges. Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, O.; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; 
Payne Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln 
Iron Works, Rutland, Vt.; F. R. Patch Manufac- 
turing Company, Rutland, Vt.; Art Metal Con- 
struction Company, Jamestown, N. Y. ; Erie City 
Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David Maydole Hammer 
Company, Norwich, N. Y.; Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Mesklr, Evansville. Ind. 
Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stove, Ranges, and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa. 

. STREET RAILWAYS. 
Terre Haute — Street Railway Company. 

WOOD AND FURNITURE. 
Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 

Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 
Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, Davenport, la.; M. Goeller's Sons, Clr- 
cleville, O. 
Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Cooperage — Cincinnati Cooperage Company, Cincin- 
nati, O.; Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin; El- 
gin Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Williams 
Cooperage Company and Palmer Manufacturing 
Company, of Poplar Bluff, Mo.; Ballard & Ballard 
Milling Company, Louisville, Ky. 
China — Wick China Company, Kittanning, Pa. 
Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, 
Ga.; O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. 
Y.; Krell Piano Company, Cincinnati, O.; N. 
Drucker & Co. (trunks), Cincinnati, O.; St. Johns 
Table Company, St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids 
Furniture Manufacturing Association, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 
Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. Y. ; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, 
Cape May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Tex.; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, Md.; 
Huttig Sash and Door Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, More- 
house, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort Bragg, 
Cal. 
Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus 
Buggy and Harness Company, Columbus, O. 
Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; 
B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, O. ; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, O. 
Pens — L. E. Waterman & Co., New York City. 
Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co., Batavia, N. Y.; 

J. N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, HI. 
Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Company, Norfolk, 

N. Y. 
Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 

l my, Coshocton, O. 
Hallways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



Fag Ends. 

A selfish man is never long remembered. 

Only those who can feel deeply will be 
faithful to a principle. 

Work for direct legislation through the 
Initiative and Referendum! 



'•'Contentment of mind'' will never engen- 
der the ambition to do great deeds. 



Shallow doctrines are the most plausible. 
We must dig deep for fundamental truths. 

The "will of Cod" is the will to do right, 
which every man may cultivate within him- 
self. 



Don't give your brain too much leisure. 
Rust will destroy an engine much quicker 
than wear. 



While striving for an ideal government, 
let us not forget that even the worst gov- 
ernment is better than none at all. 



Deep thinking, like deep-sea fishing, will 
sometimes bring to the surface unclassified 
thoughts from unexplored depths of the soul. 



The ease with which many writers man- 
age to write, all around a "burning issue" 
without even once touching upon any of its 
essentials, is almost perfect enough to raise 
it to the dignity of art. 



Boys, don't be too cynically explosive in 
your comments on the specific gravity of the 
pie crust the "doctor" manufactures for you. 
Remember the old deepwater days when, 
after eating a hearty pea-soup dinner, you 
used to throw your chest out with a sigh of 
satisfaction and say: "Well, thank God for 
that much, anyhow. I feel about two pieces 
of pork better now than T did before." Those 
were the days when the sight of a "swab" 
mince pie, or even dried-apple pie, in the 
forecastle, somehow stirred up thoughts of 
Christmas or Washington's Birthday — eh 
mates ? 



"Al" Adams, "policy king," ex-convict, 
"the meanest thief on earth," etc., celebrated 
his release from Sing Sing the other day by 
giving a dinner at the Hotel Saint Regis, 
the most expensive and most exclusive ( ?) 
hostelry in the world. After dinner the dis- 
tinguished party were driven to the opera, 
where a private box had been reserved for 
their use. Their goings and comings were 
chronicled by the newspapers as fully almost 
as though Mr. Adams had been an ultra- 
prominent grand larceny "king of finance" 
instead of merely an insignificant five-mil- 
lion-dollar petty larceny "policy king." Ver- 
ily, this age thinks better of a gilded thief 
than of an honest man in overalls ! 



The increase in sobriety among seamen in 
recent years has been most noticeable and 
gratifying. Drunkenness, which at one time 
was the rule, is now the exception, and such 
cases of it as still remain are slowly but 



surely being eliminated by the simple expe- 
dient of placing a premium on sobriety in 
the shape of preferment of sober men when 
shipments are made. It is now a fixed pol- 
icy of the Seamen's Union to discourage by 
all means the excessive use of drink, and, in 
its business relations with him, to make the 
drunkard realize that the way of the trans- 
gressor is, indeed, hard. In this matter, as 
in all others, the Seamen's Union has gone 
on the plain proposition that an ounce of 
practice is worth a pound of theorizing. 



The present is an iconoclastic age. A rev- 
olution is taking place in the intellectual 
world. Men in all walks of life are begin- 
ning to question the wisdom and justice of 
ihe most sacred and supposedly immutable 
human institutions and doctrines. This is 
a healthy sign, for unquestioning faith in 
ready-made dogmas is the attitude of mental 
slaves and unworthy of reasoning beings. 
Yet, there is always the danger of going to 
the other extreme and rejecting truths sim- 
ply because they have in the past been as- 
sociated with errors. This has been done 
before by men. It was so notably during 
and immediately after the French Revolu- 
tion. Let us make haste slowly, therefore, 
in changing our faiths, and bear in mind al- 
ways the wise injunction of the Apostle: 
"Prove all things; hold fast that which is 
e 1!" 



Machine Fitters in Russia. 

According to a report of the German < !on- 
sul at Kief there appeared a short time ago 
in the Stefnoi Krai, published in Omsk, a 
communication to the effect that the Ameri- 
can firm of D. M. Osborne & Co., which sells 
annually more than $510,000 worth of agri- 
cultural implements at that place, has de- 
cided to erect a technical school in which 
persons will be trained to use agricultural 
implements and to instruct farmers in their 
use. The company found that the lack of 
knowledge of agricultural machines was the 
greatest drawback to the development of its 
trade in that region. 

This idea is also applicable to other parts 
of Russia. The Governments of Kkaterinos- 
laf and the region of the Don should erect 
such a school. The agricultural implements 
purchased there are for the most part of Rus- 
sian manufacture and are no cheaper and no 
better than foreign-made machines. The for- 
eign machines are discriminated against 
solely because the Russians are not familiar 
with them. In the other governments there 
Lb not this need. 

Agricultural and mechanical students in 
the Polytechnical Institute at Kief and the 
Technological Institute in Kharkof are 
taught the manufacture and use of agricul- 
tural machines, and the provinces of Kief, 
Volhynia, Kharkof and Poltava also have a 
number of agricultural schools in which pu- 
pils are given instruction regarding the use 
and mounting f agricultural machines. The 
agricultural interests of Russia are espe- 
cially desirous of giving instructions along 
these lines. 

In the consular district of Kief agricultur- 
ists are seldom embarrasssed by lack of tech- 
nical knowledge, which is to be gotten when 
needed from near-by sugar factories. 



International Seamen's Union ot America. 

Affiliated with ihe 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF I. \ Hi ill. 



WM. II. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S I XION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches : 
BANGOR. ME., 44 Union St. 

►RTLAND, MR, S77A Fore St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I., 4G4 South Main St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 37 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y.,68 West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Southeast corner Second 
and Lombard Sts. 

BALTIHOBE, MR. 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, VA„ 52 Campbells Wharf. 
NEW BEDFORD. MASS., 7 South Water St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA.. BS7 Tchoupitoulas St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 

ATI ANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 

I I t . • 1 1 1 1 1 1 : . i- i i- r -. : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

DraucheH: 
NEW YORK CITY, 51-52 South St. 

3TON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA, 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MD„ 1800 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA., corner Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE. ALA.. 104 South Commerce St. 
GALVESTON, TEX., 20 Strand St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters : 

BOSTON, MASS., 223 Commercial St. 

Brcnch: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 166 Christopher St. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branches: 
GLOUCESTER. MASS.. 141% Main St. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 129 Twenty-third St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 



WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

CHICAGO, ILL, 121-123 North Desplaines St. 
Branches: 

MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Mais Bt 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O.. 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O.. 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 1702 Summit St. 
N'iKTH TONA WANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT. MICH., 7 Woodbridgre St., East. 
SUPERIOR, WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, WIS.. BIB East Second St. 
BAY CITY. MICH., 919 North Water St. 
RACINE, WIS., 923 Forest St. 
MANITOWOC. WIS., 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA.. 107 Thud St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. ILL.. 138 Ninety-second St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters : 

EUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
Branches: 
DETROIT, MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA. N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG. X. Y.. 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, MICH., 9i9 Water St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, WASH.. 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, WASH.. 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT ToWNSEND. WASH., 88% Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH, P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. OR., 23 North Front St. 
EUREKA, CAL., P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. I., P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Brani-li : 
SEATTLE. WASH , Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MMHNE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAX FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. WASH.. Colman Dock. Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 

SAX FRAXCISCO, CAL., 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. "WASH., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquartc rx: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 64 Mission St. 

Branch: 

SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION 

Headquarters, Astoria, Or. 

II. M. LORNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

Tho Reading Room Is open at all times to Members 

of the Sailors' Union. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mis- 
sion. 
American Printing House, 1067 Market. 
Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 
Barry, James H., The Star Press, 429 

Montgomery. 
Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 
Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 
Benson & Lisa, 776 Bryant. 
Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 
Boulin-Leichner Co., 619 Filbert. 
Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., 321 Cali- 
fornia. 
Brunt, W. N., 102-104 Second. 
Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 
California Printing Co., 41-43 Eighth. 
Church Press, 23 Davis. 
Commercial Publishing Co., S. E. cor. 

First and Mission. 
Cook, The Morton L.., Second and Minna. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 
Dally Racing News, 21-23 First. 
Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 
Dettmar, C. H„ 529 California. 
Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 
Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 
Fording & Payne, 22 Clay. 
Francis-Valentine Co., 103-109 Union 

Square. 
Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 
Galloway Publishing Co., cor. Mission 

and Second. 
Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 1019 

Market. 
Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 
Golden West Press, 527 Mission. 
Gould, W. H., 1019 Market. 
Hancock Bros., 73 Third. 
Harvey, John D., 246 Sutter. 
Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 
Hiester, Wm. A., City Hall Square. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 
Hinton Printing Co., 516 Commercial. 
Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 
Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 
Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 
Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 
Lacaze, I«., 519 California. 
Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 
Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 
Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 
Leidecker, C. Co., 156 New Montgomery. 
Leilich & Colburn. City Hall Square. 
Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 
Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 
Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 
Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 
Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 
McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 
Meyerfeld. Albert M.. 414 Pine. 
Meyer Printing Co., 638 Mission. 
Mission Free Press, The, 2401 Mission. 
Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 
Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 
Munk, R., 809 Mission. 
Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Nevin, C. W. & Co., 632 Commercial. 
Pacific Heights Printery, 2438 Sacra- 
mento. 
Partridge, John. 306 California. 
Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 
Phelan, F. M., 1010 Buchanan. 
Phillips, Smyth & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 
Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 

of Justice. 
Polyglott Press, 723 Montgomery. 
Roesch, Louis Co., 321-325 Sansome. 
Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 
Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 
San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405 • 

407 Sansome. 
Shanley, J. M., 414 Clay. 
Spaulding, Geo. & Co.. 414 Clay. 
Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 
Standard Printing Co.. 518 Clay. 
Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 
Sterett, W. I. Co.. 933 Market. 
Sterling Press, 213 Stevenson. 
Steutzel & Co., 109 California. 
Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 
Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square Ave. 
Town Talk Printing Co., cor. Mission 

and Second. 
Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 
Upton Bros., 17 Fremont. 
Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 
Wahl & Drake, 850 Market. 
Wale Printing Co.. 621 Clay. 
Wenderoth & Brown. 319 California. 
Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 
Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 
Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 
Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 
Wlnterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 
Bookbinders. 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Brown & Power, 508 Clay. 
Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. . 
Kitchen, John Jr. Co., 510-514 Commer- 
cial. 
Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 
McGeeney, Wm. H., 33 Stevenson. 
Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 
Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 
Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 
Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

Lithographers and Printers. 
Britton & Rey, 625 Commercial. 
Galloway Lithographing Co., 410 ban- 
some. _ * 
Roesch Co., Louis, 321-325 Sansome. 
Photo-Engravers and Etchers. 
Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Mont- 
gomery, near Mission. 
Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 
California Engraving Co.. 506 Mission. 
Lewis & Newberry Co., 645 Market. 
McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 
Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant Ave. 
Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 

Ave 
Union' Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 

Yoseniite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 

American Press Association, 207 Sacra- 

Hoffschiieider Bros., 412 Commercial. 
Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 



How You Can Best Invest 

$2.50 IN SHOES 



World's WorKers. 



Advice for Men or Women. Come straight to 
the <( RIGHTWAY "— that different store. 
Ask to see our $2.5'o shoes. Call for your 
favorite leather — vici kid, box calf or patent 
leather. Keep the man busy until you find 
your favorite style. Then ask as many 
questions as you please about quality, wear — 
anything. If he answers to your satisfaction, 
you've found a good $2.^0 shoe investment. 




Phelan Building, 812-814 Market Street, San Francisco. 
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 



m 



■**********^************£*4^***^^ 




$1 a week 



Gold Watch or Diamond 



UINITED STATES | 
WATCH CLUBS 




640 MARKET ST. 



ROOM 3 t 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager. y> 



Union Boot & Shoe Store 

United Wobkingmen -Am 
Co-Operative Company's rWf 
Shoes Constantly on Hand ■*■* 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

C LESTER, 12 Steuart St. 



44 EAST STREET 

Room 6— Phone Bush 341 



Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

ALTERING AND REPAIRING 



J. m. RICHARDS, Prop. 



The California Co-Operative Meat Co. 

OF OAKLAND 

Are now operating five first-olaaa Markets fitted up with all the modern 
fixtures, consisting of electric fans, cold storage rooms, etc. We have our 
own delivery service, which we believe to be l he best in Oakland. We own 
our own wagons, horses, buggies, etc. We are slaughtering «Ij our own stock 
on the ranch where they are raised, and we do not drive or ship them in cars 
to be hauled three days and nights without food or water, as is often the case 
with cattle and small stock that are shipped alive. 

Main Office, Sausage Kitchen and Cold Storage Plant: 
32S Twelfth Street, Oakland 

J. L. DAVIE, Manager. 

FRANCISCO OFFICE: 310 O'FARRELU ST. 



SAN 



Where shares may be obtained on application. 
One share is all that can be held by any person. 



M. A. MAHER 

Men's - Furnishing - Goods 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Worklngmen'i Shoe*. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 

206 EAST STREET, NEAR HOWARD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



The Castle Cigar Store 

250 Eaat Street, near Folaom, 

KEEPS THE 

BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS AND TO- 
BACCOS. 

Union-made Goods a Specialty. 
G. H. PALMER, Proprietor. 



The military has been called out in 
Switzerland; this time against the tun- 
nel miners of St. Gallen. 

In Germany the seamstresses have 
formed unions and affiliated with the 
Tailors' and Tailoresses' Union. 

The lockout and strike in the building 
trades at Stockholm, Sweden, have end- 
ed in a victory for the workers. 

Tailors are on strike in Switzerland 
against a wage of 2s Id for female and 
4s 2d for male hands per day of ten 
hours. 

The International Miners.' Congress, 
sitting in Paris, recently, decided that 
the eight-hour day should be generally 
legalized. 

The Danish tobacco-workers have 
gained, through a seventeen weeks' 
strike, a considerable improvement of 
their conditions. 

An International Timber Workers' 
Congress recently met at Amsterdam. 
Ten nations were represented by twenty- 
three delegates of sixteen unions. 

It is said that fully one-fourth of the 
boot- workers in Sydney, Australia, are 
out of work, owing to largo importations 
from Victoria and South Australia. 

The riveters of South Staffordshire, 
Eng., were last year subjected to a re- 
duction of 20 per cent. They are now 
on strike for an advance of 15 per cent. 
The bakers of Dusseldorf, Germany, 
are trying to obtain a minimum wage 
of 26s per week at eleven hours' work 
per day, and overtime 6d per hour ex- 
tra. 

The women clerks of London, Eng., are 
rapidly increasing. In 1891 there were 
17,859; in 1901, there were 55,784. Since 
that the number has been greatly in- 
creased. 

The Canadian trade-unions warn Eng- 
lish and Scotch workmen against going 
to Canada in search of work. Wages 
are low there, and there are thousands 
of unemployed. 

During the year ended March last the 
New Zealand Arbitration Court deliver- 
ed twenty-five awards in industrial dis- 
putes, and nineteen industrial agree- 
ments were registered. 

After having lost a case of unlawful 
dismissal in court, a Saxon manufactur- 
er lawfully dismissed all organized em- 
ployes to replace them with imported 
Italians at 15s Od a week. 

For stopping work at Murton colliery. 
Seaham Harbor, Eng., without notice 
on three dates in August, 148 miners 
have been fined $1.25 each a day dam- 
ages and condemned to pay costs of 
court. 

Boot factories in New South Wales, 
Australia, are now demanding certifi- 
cates of competency for their employes, 
in order, if possible, to grade those who 
have them at not less than the mini- 
mum wage. 

The miners of Durham, whose wages 
during this year have been already sub- 
jected to two reductions, totaling 3% 
per cent, have submitted a proposed 
third reduction to the arbitration of 
Lord Davey. 

The income of the Associated Ship- 
wrights' Society, of the United King- 
dom, for the quarter ending on June 30, 
was £9,743, nearly £1,000 less than the 
amount received during the first quar- 
ter of the year. 

The Triennial Conference of the Amal- 
gamated Society of Tailors was held at 
Dublin, Ireland, in the middle of Au- 
gust. There were about sixty delegates 
present, representing 300 branches 
throughout the United Kingdom. 

The ninth annual conference of the 
Federation of Sailmakers of Great Brit- 
ain and Ireland was held at Stepney, 
London, during the middle week of Au- 
gust. The Secretary reported that there 
had been no reduction of wages during 
the year. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



General News. 



Forty-nine coal miners were killed by 
an explosion in a mine at Terico, near 
Trinidad. Col., on October 28. 

The Vossische Zeitung, the oldest 
newspaper in Berlin, Germany, celebrat- 
ed its 200th anniversarj on October 29. 

Secretary of State Hay lias issued a 
call for a aecond meeting of The Hague 
Tribunal, subject to the approval of the 
Powers. 

An employment agency in New York 
( itv proposes t<> obtain calls for minis- 
ters and positions for singers, organists 
and choirmasters. 

Mayoi- Ike Acheson, of Binghamton, 
Tenn., has been convicted of selling li«l 
nor on Sunday and sentenced to thirty 
days in the workhouse and a fine of $50. 

By careful calculation the cost of ma- 
larial fever in Texas alone is estimated 
by Dr. Woldert to he at least $5,000,000 
a year, and probably nearer $10,000,000. 

Patrick Lynch, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
has been appointed national business 
agenl of the United Batters of North 
America by General President John 
Moffett. 

Instructions have been issued to re 

cruiting officers that hereafter only citi- 
zens of the United States will he ac- 
cepted for enlistment in the Navy, except 
in the cases of cooks, stewards and mess 

attendants. 

Diana Corbin, who enjoyed the unique 
distinction of being the only living 

person who was born a slave in the State 
ei New York, died at Battle ('reck. 
Mich., on October l!">. She was over 
KM) years old. 

Bi fore the National Prison Congress, 
in annual convention at Quincy, 111., Dr. 
Henry G. Hatch, of Quincy, advocated 

the infliction of "easy death" upon de- 
generates as a means of preventing the 
spread of degeneracy. 

William Volker, of Trenton, N. J., 

claims that he is at work, with pros- 
pect- of success, on an appliance which 
when attached to a telephone, will allow 
two persons using the telephone to tee 

each other when talking. 

The Illinois Coal Operator-' Associa 
tion has decided to stand by the action 

of its executive board in Chicago regard- 
ing a demand that the hoisting engineers 

be given the same rate of wages for the 
ensuing year as for the year past. 

The new Mediterranean service of the 
White Star line, which has entered into 
competition with the Cunard line for 
the Italian trade, was inaugurated at 
New York on October 20 with the sailing 
of the Republic, for Gibraltar, Naples 
and Genoa. 

Judge Ferris, of Wilkesbarre, Pa., has 
decided that, the Carpenters' and Join- 
ers' Union must bring into court iU 

I ks, as desired by J. E. Patterson & 

Co., who claim that the Union has vio- 
lated an injunction restraining it from 
interfering with the firm. 

Emma Grennell, aged fifteen years, has 
been awarded $40,000 damages for the 
loss 'd" one arm and the serious injury 
of the other in a street-ear accident in 
Chicago. 111., in 1805. This IB said to 
he the largest sum ever awarded by a 
Chicago court for persona] injuries. 

John Tyler. American Yicc Consul- 
General at Teheran. Persia, ha- cabled 
the State Department that the Shah has 
telegraphed the Crown Prince of Tabriz 
to arrest immediately the murderers of 
Doctor Labori, the American missionary 
who was killed many months ago by 
fanatical Persians. 

Bids were recently opened at the of- 
fices of the Panama Canal Commission 
for supplying a large amount of steel 
dump car-, cement, vitrified pipes, valves 
and hydrants for construction work on 
the Canal. Approximately, s-J. 500,000 
is involved, of which $2,000,000 is on 
ears. The result of the bids will not DC 
known for some time. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters are advertised for six months 
and kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not called 
for at the expiration of one year letters 
will be returned to the Postoffice. 



Aagard, A. M. 
Aa Ito. Arthur 
Adams, David I. 
Ada mson-1144 
Adolf, John 
Agerup. Rich. 
Ahlquist, Albert 
Ahlstedt, Anders 
Alexis, Hakan 
Allan, John 
,\ 1 1 onen, Nes1 or 
Amundsen, Pet 
Andersen-689 
Andersen-S89 
Andersen-912 
Andersen-925 
Andersen, Adolf 
Andersen, Andrew 



Anderson-991 
Anderson-1218 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, Emll 
Anderson, G. F. A. 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson, Sven 
Andersson-139 
Andersson-lllB 
Andersson-1184 
Andersson, A. W. 
Andersson, C. S. 
Andersson, Eskil 
Andersson, Fred H. 
Andersson, Gust 
Andersson, Hjalmar 
A hdersson, John G. 
Antonsen, Martin 



Andersen, Bernhard Apps, Alf 



Andersen, Eld. 

Andersen, Henry 
Andersen, Nels 
Anderson-68 
Baker, C. P. 
Baker, John 
B loom, B. M. 
Barber, A. 
Basberg. Hans H. 

lv. O. 
Bauer. Ludv. 
Bayne, Paul R. 
Bechler, Joseph 
Bensson-143 
Berger-121() 

holm. Bdv. 
Bernard, S. 
Bernert, Fred 
Blankenfeld. O. 
Blinne, Karl 
Calnan, Geo. 
Carlsen, E.-699 
Carlsen, John L. 
Carlson, C. V. 

Carlsson, John 
Carlsson, W. S. 

Caroe, Arthur 
Christensen, E. 
Christensen, G. L. 



Arnold. Andrew 
Arvidson, A. M. 
Asmussen. M. C. 
Austrand, Chas. 
Boberg, L. Larsen 
Borini, Lewis 
Bottcher, J. G. C. 
Boudoux, Leon 
Boyesson, Carl A. 
Brandters, J. 
Braun. F.-1195 ■ 
Bredesen. Edwin 
Br Odin, Julius 
Brose. R. 
Brouwet i ;. 
Brown, E. 
Buthler, Krist. 

I , Viktor A. 
Byerling, C. A. 

Christensen, O. M. 
Christiansen. Carl 
Christoffersen, H. 
i ilarke, W. W. 
Cleary, Thomas 
Clough. H. R. 
Coadon, Louis 
Connor, John J. 
Connor, Wm. 



Christensen, Henri k Cooper, Hans 
Christensen, J. R. Cutmann. A. R. 



Dabel, W. G. 
Dahl, John M. 
Dahlgren, Karl 
Daniel. J.— (M.) 
I lanlelsson, Ernst 
Dexter, Geo. S. 
i ilener, Aiik 
Ekstrom-518 
Ekstrom. J. P. 
Ellison, EdN. 
Els, John 
Enbom, Wm. 
Engell, Emil 

berg, Albin 
i 'a gerlund, Mr. 
Fastrup, 1-:. P. 
1- I . m i i ii . John 

f'orstrom, Karl 
Gaedecke. E. 
I tabling, Karl 

in, Geo. A. 
Gilbert. Wm. S. 
]. Elllng 
( Sjerlow, l ngw. 
Gohring. Wm. 
i rossel, Carl 
Gothe, V. B. 
Grandahl, Hjalmar 
Gray, J. K. 
• •ii. J. 
en, < 'has. 

I [agsl rum- 1 ti.~r> 

, Lennart 
i i a ka nsson, Fred 
l [akansson, G. 
Halvorsen, H. 

[sa k 
Halvorsen, Morten 

C. F. 
Hamrln, < '. 
Hansen-1162 
Hansen- 1 2 1 8 
Hansen, Andrew 
Hansen, C. Gulda- 

ger 

Hansen. Geo. -1410 
Hansen. Hans 

-.I lans P. 
: San: R. 
i [ansen, Lars 
Hansen, Maurius 



Dik. H. L.-397 
Dittmar, Otto 
Dodgson, A. H. 
Doense, J. 
Donner, Matt 

r, M. 
Dvck. Max 
Eriksen-512 
Erikson, E.-38 
Erickson, F. 
Evald, Ernst 
Evensen, Einar O. 

Foster, Frank 
Fox, Thomas 
Franciskovic, Ed 
French, J. A. 

Grey, E. J. 
Grondahl. Y. 
< Irunbock, Joh. 
Grundberg, Ivar 
Gulbransen. Nils 
Guldberg, Randolf 
i ; i ndersen-515 
Gundersen. Th. 
Gundersen, Tom 
Gunlach, John 

I [aroldsen, Chas. 
Hay, Wm.-1179 
Hazel. W. 

1 i.'i 111 ! 

Heleneus-1360 

sen, Jonas 
Hell, A. -1012 
Helmke, P. A. 

Henriksen. A. G. 
Hot-hold. W. 
i ge, S. 
Herman. Alex 

I I Iggins, J. M. 
HI11-U48 
Hinner. Paul 

r, w. 
Hjeresen, V. J. 
Hobson. Thomas 
Hoheisel, < 
Holmes. Chris 
Holmes. Martin 
Holm. Oscar 



I [ansen, Nokhart M.Hornberg-1383 



n, Sigur 

-hi. John 
1 lansson, Hilmer 
lid. Julius 
Jakobsen, N. C. 
Jankeri, Oskar 
.l.i nhunen, W. 
Janssen, Weert 
Jansson, John 
.T.i nsson. K. A. 
Jensen-769 
Jensen-919 
Jensen, Anders C. 
Jensen, Aug. Adolf 
Jensen, C. F. 
Jensen, H.-869 
Jensen, H. F. 
Jensen. Niels O. 
Jensen. Rasmus 
J d.annesen-871 
Jehansen-666 
Jchansen-1216 
Johansen. Borge J. 
Johansen, Ernest 
Johansen, F. C. 
Johansen, G. E. 
johansen. Gunner 
Johansen. John P. 
Kaehne, R. 
Kamposek. C. 
Ka rlsen-388 
Karlsen, John L 
Karlson-863 
Karlsson, G. J. 
(Carlsson, K. a. 
Ka rvonen, K. G. 
Kihl. Harry 
KJellberg, G. A. 
Klausen. Carl J. 
Klemettila, G. 
KUngsl i con. < i. 
KnieTlng, John 
Langr, John 
I.angvardt. N. 
1 .a rkin. Sam 
Larsen-918 
I.r.rsen-950 
Larsen, Anton 
Larsen, Axel 



Horn, Krist 
Houston. Rob 
Hurley. James 

Ingwardsen-74 

Johansen. T. P. 
Johansson-880 
Johansson -1095 
Johansson-1396 
Johansson, A. 
Johansson, Aug. 
Johansson Curl 
Johansson. J. K., 

Johansson, X. L. 
Johnsen-983 
Johnson-588 
Johnson-1399 
Johnson-1420 
Johnson, ( 'has 
Johnson, Chas. J. 
Johnson, Ed. F. E. 
Johnson, W. J. 
Johnson. Wm. 
Johnsson-1 201 
Jonsoi 
Jonsson, < iscar 

E. S. 
i. Jorgen 
a urgensen, w. 
I-: noph, J. Olsen 
Knudsen, Fred 
Knutsson, O. H. 
Knutson, Olaf A. 
Kollman-886 
Kongsvoln, R. 
K ristensen-928 
Kristensen, H. 
Kristonsen, O. M. 
Kristiansen. T. O. 
Kristoffersen -61 4 
Kristoffersen, K. H. 
Krohnert. Alb. 
K ii iiedt . VVm. 

Geo. 
Lewin, Chas. 
Lie. Oarl-1042 
Likeits. Christ 
Lillle. Fred 
Lindberg, G. W. 
Lindstrom, G. A. 



Larsen, C.-824 I indman E. H, 

Larsen, Ferdinand Lockwood, Chas. 

Larsen, J.-912 Lofberg, F. Magnus 

Larsen, John L. Lofgren, Chas. W. 

Larsson-933 Lolman. Werner 

Laws, H Lorentzen-990 

l .. Bloa, S. Lovin, Francois 

Lelneweber, J. Luden, Albin 

Leino. I - Lund, Chas. 

Leith off, Carl Lundin, Chas. 

Madison, David McCell, Thomas 

Ma,lsen-667 . McCombs, F. S. 

Madson-952 McFadden, Wm. 

Magnusson, Karl McGarrick, John 

Mahoney, F. E. McGrath, Frank 

Mahoney, Frank Melnholz, Anton 

Mahsing, AVm. Meinseth, Albert 

Malmkvlst, Carl Menthen, Otto 

Mannion, James Mersman, A. 

Martelock, Chas. .Michael. Walter 

Martlnsen, M. Morre, B. F. 

Materre, Alex Morrlssey, Jas. 

Matiasen, Nils Morris, Wm. T. 

Mathlson, J. M. Mortensen, Chr. 

Mathlsen, T. L. Mudge, Arthur 

.Mathsen, Olaf Mullen, Leo L. 

Mattejat. W. Muller, R. 

Matteson, A. M. Mullina, Dan 

Mavor-1371 Munson, Michael 
McCarthy, Peter 

Xelson. H. L. Nissen, Jens 
Xeilsen, M. P. ack. Hans 

Nlelsen-695 Nor, Chas. 

Nielsen-859 Nordblom, B. G. 

Nil lscii, Jens A. Xorheim, Johan 

Nielsen, Niels C. Nygren. Gust. 

Nielsen, Ole Nymalm, Felix 

Nielsen, W. N\ man-711 

Nh Isen, Willie Xyroos-769 
Xilssen-737 

Oberg, C. W. n-759 

Oberg. Herbert Olsen, Carl J. 

Oberhauser, J. Olsen, Hans 

( >'! )aly, John Olsen Li onard 

Oeftiger, Geo-. Olsin, OlafS. 

n-470 Olson, Olof 

Olonzo. Julius Olsson-597 

Olsen-206 . Olsson-824 

i rtsen-615 Ommundsen, O. 

Olsen-699 I Iraff, I 'avid 

i Hsen-703 I >rchard, S, II 

Olsen-727 Osterberg. Frithjof 

Palsen. Torwald Petersen, Viktor 

Pa pke, Harry Patterson, K. J. 

Peabody, Frank Petterson. Knut 

Pedersen, Chr. Pettersson-725 

Pedersen, K. I' ' tersson-844 

Pederson, Louts Phair. Wm. 

Petersen-659 Pick, R. O. W. 

Petersen-864 Pledvache. E. 

Petersen-954 Pollack, Paul 
Petersen, Bertel 

Ramsey, H. W. Rolke, Geo. 

Rantala, Sam Rollo. R. 

Rasmusen. Alb. Roschack, Paul 

Rasmus3en-690 Rosenblad, A. 
Rasmussen, Geo. P. Rosen, Frank 

Riches, A1L-663 Rnellans. Jules 

Rockwell-621 Rustad, Sverre 
Rohl, Werner 

Salhareasen, Jorgen Smith. Valdemar 

B llvesen, Sam Soderman. Elis 

Bamuelson, W. I.. Sohst, Adolf 

Sandav, Frank Solie, Ingvald 

Sanberg, Theo. Sorensen, M. 

Sandberg-938 Sorensen, N. 
Sandberg, Gottfried Sorensen, T. M. 

Santos, Augustin Sorensen, Tom 

Schaefer. T. Stahn, Otto 
Schtmmelphinlg, A. Sterne. Geo. 

Schlueter, rol n Stockman. L. 

Schlump, John Storsten, Henry 

Schwenke. Karl Ptoschau, Johan 

S< '!• r, Wm. Sundherg, K. K. 

Si i rero, LouW Sundborg, John 

Setterberg, K. Sundholm-1438 

Silloots, Tonnies Sundholm, Erik 

Silva. Joe H. Sve ndsen, Christ 
Simonsen-1 1 47 I en, Karl 

Simonsen, Fr. Svendsen. Otto 
Simoiisi ii, Fred igaard, P. 

Simonsen. Tom Svensen-1568 
Simpson. L. C. nson, J. P. 

Sivertsen. Engv. Svonsson. Karl O. 

Sjursen, [i Swanson-1331 

Talbert, Frank Thorssen. Fred 

Thiele. A. Toick. Matt 

Thomas. Jos. Tonipson. Loul 

Thoren, Gust Tulin. Fritz 

Thorn. Arvid Tvedt. H. S. 

Udby. Harold rirlght, T. 

Cdd. John-885 Cnterein. F. 
I'lierwininier. F. 

V an der Lnhen. F. Vincent. Jos. 

VanGrlcken, Fred Vogei. a. 

Van Moelon, Ph. Void, O. P. 

Vassal lo, P. Von Asperen. W. 

Viereck. Helnrlch Von Kleist, H. 

VJgre, Alf. Vuclch, V. 

Wagner. J. Wle, A. 

Wahlstrom, A. A. Wiebke, Ernst 

Walter. E. Wihtol, Ernest 

Wanag, M. wiik, H. 

Warren. W. A. Wikman-677 

Wesik, Gust. Wilhelmsen. Chas. 

Weibust. John Wilson. Robert 

Weldeman, Prank Wright, W. B. 

Welden. Ed Younger, A. J. 

Zcrberg, Geo. Zimmerman, F. 



SEATTLE!, WASH. 

Abflalomsen, O. M. Ft lix. L. 
Albers, i ieo. strom, H. 

.■ lexander, s. r lynn, P. 

Amundsen. P. I'orsti im. C. 

Andersen. A. F. Fraser, J. 

Andersen, B. BL-871 Fredriksen, L. 

Andersen. Fred H. (ierwin. Geo. 

Andersen, Jacob GJ< rlow, I. 

Andersen. I.. T. derson, M. 

a I ;. F. A. Gonzales, F. 

Anderson, J. I iralnger, J. 

Anderson, Olaf -782 Greenland. H. 
Anderson, Wm. 6>or, Edvin 

Aiiss. Alfred Gronnestad, II. 

lius, Ture Gronlund, O. 

Aulnten, M.-'.ill Guke, John 

Baberg, I.. L. Haglund. Carl 

Bi ckwlth, w. X. Hanley, J. 

Berg, Thos. A. Hansen, Alfred. A. G. 

Blrkelund, R. Hanson, Bernhard 

Bioch. H. Hansen, Edvard 

1 "inburg. Gustaf Han I H-nry 

Bluseth, M. Hansen. H E. 

i irurlra, \. ii:. risen, K. 

Cameron. R. Havder, P. 

■ mis, w. i lekkola, S. 

Carlson, L. P. Hellman. Carl 

Christensen, ^.dolf Henriksen, Elert 

Christensen, Q. I* Henriksen, Hartuch 

Christensen. X. Hcrmansen, F. 

Chri <!' ' Mi a I lermansen, I., 

isen. C. J. i ii i seley, R. S. 

E. Hilaricn, C. 

-ren, C. J. llofman, F. 

.1 Hokensen. C. 

' Iksen, I. i Mn r lng, B. A 

I •> k. C. J. Van Huhley, Howard 

a. A u ton v Unit. W. 

en, Fred Jacobsen, J. A.-779 



Olsen. O. H. 
Olsen, Oscar 

Olsen. 1'. 1- 

( dsen, I'. O. 

I 'Im 11. R. 

i dsen, Sam 
Paulson, C. 

m. Edvin 
Pearson, .1. 
Pedersen, H. P. 

i 'i .lei::-. ii, Lars 
Pi hrsing, H. 
l'en.i. rgast, E. 

I . lalville. N. 

Petei -en. II. A. 
Peterson i I. 
Petersen, i ' 
i . i tersen, E. 

son, Otto 
i 'ii per, H. 
1 -roll. H. 
Pringle, R. 
Proctor, Geo. 
Rasmussen, U 
Rasmussen, Olaf 

R< ay, S. 

Riordan, P. 
Robinsen, J. 

Robinson. W. 
Rogne. J. T. 
Roux. Geo. 
Saahlgard, T. 

Salvi sen, S. 
Sandber.K. A. 
bosla, M. 
n. J. 
Schwartskopf, P. 
Seland 

ei Ce-. 

Smith. <'. A. V. 
Mi ith. i:. 
Smith. Wm. 
Soderlund, \. 
Soderma n J. M. 

en, i 

en, i: -1 1 la 
Sovik, M. 
st ihsing, w. 
Ptone. W. H.-1533 
St rom, a. 

Strom. J. G. 

m. John 

Swell- 

Swensen. T. 
Thayfon, John 

s. A. 
Thompson, T. 
Thomsen, Ed 
Thorsen, M. 
': i orsen, Theo. 
Void. O. P. 
\\'a brunberg, O. 
Walker, i leo. 
Warren, Wm. 
Weitung, H. 
Wennerlund, A. 
Welzol, K. 
Wich, W. 
Wlckblad, O. 

Wie. A. 

Wtedner, K. 

Will, i;, o 
Wilson, Albert 
Wilson. Thos. 
Zelinski, P. 



Jansen, Werner 
en, J. 

Jensen, Julius 
Jensen, S. G. 
Johansen, J. -1428 
Johansen, J. S. 
Johansen. L.-1210 
Johansen, S. -1205 
Johnson. Ivar 
Johnson, chas. 
.Tollnit. W. 
.lone-. B. O. 
Johansen, Carl L. 
Joha meson. J. -1119 

Johnson, C. A. 
Johnson, l [Jalmar 

Johnson, James 
Johnson, John 
Jorgcnsen. J. M. 
Josef sen. F. W. 
Karlson, Gustaf 
Karlson, Ivar 
Karlson, K. E.-903 
Keastner, Hans 
Kehoe, J. 
Kelly, Patrick 
Killstrom, B. 
Klinktr, J. 
Kloperstrom. W. 
Kongsvald, R. 
Kopplin, Robert 
Krallman. A. 
Lambuarra, M. 
Larsen, Axel 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larsen. S. 
Lauren, J. O. 
Lewsen, 1..-1008 
Lichner, J. 
Lie, J. L. 
Lind, John 
Lindquist, Karl 
Lindstrom, A. J. 
Lindstrom, i ila f 
Livanos, M. 
Lohlin, John 
Lorenz, J. O. 
Loven. K. 
Lundqulst. John 
Ml i Donald. N. 
Magnusen, Gus 

Marin. A. 
.Martinson. K. 

Mattson, A. E. 
Matt son, F. 
Mattson. M. 
Mayerkanys, W. 
Mayne, J. R. 
McDonald. J. 
McLeod, J. L. 
Medder, H. W. 
Mikkelsen, Hans 
Mulligan, J. 
Munk, T. 
Xicklasen, TI. 

Nicklasen, X. 
Xilsen, C. B. 
Xilsen. C. M. 
Xilsen. H. M. 
Nissen, Eskeld 
Ohlsen, G. F. 

a. M.-SOO 
ii. B. 
olsen. Carl J. 
i (Isen, E. 

B. M. 
Olsen, Lorentz 
Olsen, Ludvig 

SAN PEDRO, CAL, 

Akselsen, Johan Hendersen. J. 

Akerblum, Charles Tlinze, A. P. W. 

Allen, John Ho lappa, Oskar 

Amelsen. Johan Hull. Harry 

A mnell, Albert Janhunen, W. 

Andersen-735 Janson, C. L. 

Anderson-907 Jansson. Carl W. 

Andersen-912 Jean, H. G.-38fi 
Andersen, Carl en, Q. I. -1461 

Andersen. Edvard Jensen. Lewis 

Andersen, Ingbret lensen. Rasmus 

A. Johannesen. Jacob 

Andersen. Joseph Johanson. J.-146I 

Andersen, Salve Johanson, Natanial 
Anderson, A. B.-1119 Johansson. Carl- 
Anderson, A. J. lata 

Anderson, Alfred Johansson. Carl L, 

Anderson. A. G.-549 .Tohndahl. Marry 
Anderson, Bertiniis Johnsen, Carl-688 

G. Johnson-1281 

Anderson. F.-R71 Johnson. Edward 

Anderson. John Johnson. Edward A. 

Anderson, Martin Johnson. Michael 

Anderson. Otto Johnson. P. 

Anderson. S. Johnston. O. W. 

Anderssen-853 Johnson, Chas. 

Armale. Fran- lor at. son. P. J. 

Arvidsen, Axel M. Karlson. J. A. 

Baker, John Karlson-388 

Bixby. E. Karlsson. Gustaf 
Blomquist, H. Krnst 

Bock. Charles Karlsson. John 

Bogan. Patrick Kenna, Peter J. Mc 

Bohman. Eric Kihl. Harry 

Boose, Paul-fiOfi Klttelsen. Lanrlts 

Boren. Willia rn Klingstrom. Gun- 
Bortram, Wm. nar 

(package) Klover, H.-48S 

Rrnuford. Charles Knudsen. Danlrl 

Bryndal. Henry Kristensen, Gustav 

Caramatie. Charlie Kristoffersen. TT. B 

Carlson. August Kristoffersen. Karl 
Carlson, Eric A. 

Carlson, J. Larson. Gust. 

Carlson. J. -388 Larson. Olaf Edvard 

Carnaghan, w. X. Lasskey, J. 

Cheodore, Bodiou Lfhtonen. V. 
Christophersen.Carl Llndqvist. Carl 

Clausson. G. A. -804 Lovenhjelm. E. M. 

Coffman. Hilo Lundberg. Erik 

Comerford. L. Lundin Charles 

Croekstat. J. Makelninen, J. 

Diedrich. Hermann Markmnnn, Heln- 
Edlund, J. A. rich 

Eichel. Charles Matson. Victor 

Erikson, Alfred Matteson. A 

Axel Mikklesen. C. 

Fagerlund. G. E. Myhrvold. Chris- 
Foreman, Arthur Han 

Frietrom. I. M. Nelson. T. H. 

Giffln, Jim W. Nielsen. Fred-6!9 

Green, F. Xlelson. N. C. 

Gronvall. Johan Nissen, James 

Frederik Nilson. V. G. 

Grunbock. Johan Nystrom, Emil 

Gunlach. John Olsen, Andrew 

Gustafson, A. F. Olsen, John B. 

Gustafson. J. -432 Olsen. Olaf 

Gustafson, K. Os- Olsen, N.-502 

kar Olsen, Peder 

Gustafson, Oskar Olson, Adolf 

Gustavsen, Ben Olson. Benny 

Halversen. Wm. Olson. W. 

Ham. H. F. Oosterhuls. R. 

Hansen, Alf V. G. Osterling. Emli 

Hansen, Bernhard Pedersen Preston 

Hansen. Laurlts Persing. Honry 

Hansen. Theodor Peterson. Charles 

Harding, w. J. Pettonen. K. H. 

Haugan, Hilmar Peterson, Q, 

Helmke, F. A. Peterson, Martin 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 



13 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE RED FBDT 



THE ONLY STORE ON THE 
WATER FRONT OP HONOLULU 
EMPLOYING WHITE LABOR 
EXCLUSIVELY. 



SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 



FURNISHING GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
OIL CLOTHING, TRUNKS, 
TOBACCOS AND CIGARS 

THE RED FRONT 

COR. QUEEN AND NUANU STS. 
HONOLULU, H. I. 



MYRTLE CIGAR STORE 

Importers and Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. 

The only House keeping a full line of 

Union-made Goods. 

T. J. FITZ PATRICK, Proprietor. 

836 Fort Street. Honolulu, H. I. 



SANITARY 
STEAM LAUNDRY 



THK ONLY STEAM LAUNDRY 
IN HONOLULU. 



Shipping trade specially cared for. 
Work called for and delivered in 
12 liours. 

BRUCE HARTMAN, 

Manager. 



HOFFMAN CIG AR STORE 

Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor, 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanu Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Rasmussen-446 Stolsten, Karl 

Rasmussen, Emil Strelow, Albert 

Rasmussen, Olaf Svenson, Sven 

Rauer, H. Svensson, Nicolaus 

Reid, James-326 Svensson, Thure 

Robstad, Sorensen Syvertsen, Isak 

John Thallos. Mr. 

Rohde, Robert Thompson, Stephen 

Rosenblad, Karl Thorve, Gustav 
Royden, W. H. Danielsen 

Salvisen, A. Tomask. Math. 

Sandberg, Theodor Wahlstadt, Albert 

Saunders, Carl Walbergh, Joseph 

Schilling, C. Warren, Fred 

Schatze, Otto Werner, Ruben 

Sjonberg, Harald Westerholm, Aug. 

Sodergvist, Otto Whyne, Fred 

Soult. Theodor Wikstrom, Anton O. 

Staaf, Louis-1464 Zugehaer, Alex. 
Steffensen, Viggo 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

Anflndsen, O. Liilie, F. M. 

Backhaus, S. Linden, M. A. 

Baker, L. G. Lyche. N. 

Berentsen, O. Martinsen, Fugo 

Buch, D. Mathisen, M. 

Carlson, G. Miettinen, A. E. 

Coffman, Milo Mjones, Aruc 

Dischler, P. Nielsen, M. P. 

Dittmayer, Ch. Nyroos, O. J. 

Ellingsen, Fr. Olsen-492 

Engman, E. Olsen, C. A. 

Erickson, John Owens, John 

Gasman, G. r-e.tersen-864 

Gerner, Hans Pottersen, Ch. 

Hendrikson Pettersen, Peter 

Horeldsen, Ch. Stone, Wm. 

Jacobsson, A. W. Sandberg, A. 

Jean, Guezenee Schulze, Fr. 

Jones, Ch. Wallgren. A. 

Jordan, Ch. Wickstrom, A. 

Jorgensen. P. Widlund, C. W. 

Kuglund, C. Wilson, Rob. 
Kolderup, K. 

TACOMA, WASH. 

Anderson, Harry Jorgensen, Sofus 

Begowiek, John Leupstadius, Chas. 

Bjornstad, Nils Laibke, John Von 

Bloom, Chas. Mackay, Joseph 

Bray, J. K. Martinson, Holger 
Brid'geman, G. E. 

Ekerlein, Frans Mike, M. 

Engblom, J. Mortensen, Wm. 

Evans, John Nilss-on, Henry-680 

Furlong, James Smith, A. 

Fors, Alf. Soderman, Oscar 

Grant, Bert Sorensen. William 

Hansen, J. K. J. S.- Starkey, Wm. 

958 Struer, John 

Hansen. Chas. -967 Svensen, J. -802 

Karju, K. G. Thompson, C. M.- 
Horsley, R. S. 251 

Johnsen, Martin 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

Adams, Walter Currie, James 

Allen, Frans De Bruin, J. 
Andersson, A. A. Erikson, Aleck 

Andersson, J. Ferguson, Julius 

Arcadiifs, Ture Fogarty, J. P. 

Borini, Henry L. Fraser, James 

Bruce, John Frazer, John R. 

Cederstrom, Wm. Garside, James 
Carroll, R. Gilhooly, H. 

Cross, L. D. Glouaguen 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store closes at 6 p. in.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



I McCORMACK BROS. 



ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE — NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

1332 PACIFIC AVENUE, 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Call 
at 



The Union Cigar Store 

WHEN IN TACOMA 

FOR 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY AND 

PIPES. 

Local and 'Frisco Papers always on 

hand. 

2223 North Thirtieth Street. 

MERRIT TERRILL, Proprietor. 



HOQTJIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor 
call at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM AND ABERDEEN 

For your Clothing, Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Shoes, Rubber 

Boots and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND GAPS 




HOHUIA.M, 

WASH. 



Gustafson. Aksel 
Hansen, Edward 
Hansen, H. 
Hilarion, Chas. 
Hinner, P. 
Ingebretsen, Nils- 

407 
Jensen, W. E. 
Johanson, Ernest 
Johanson, Frank 
Johansson, Knut 
Johnson, Maune 
Klein, T. 
Knutzer, Charles 
Labastide, Joe 



Laine, Francois 
Legallais, Jules 
Lie, Carl 
Lindberg, G. W. 
Lindstam, Olof A. 
Lundberg, K. H. 
McCarthy, John 
Nielsen, N. 
Nyberg, C. 
O'Donovan, Jack 
Ong, George 
Samuelsen, Krist 
Schilling, Carl 
Sorensen, C. 
Swanson, F. O. 



EUREKA, CAL. 

Anderson, Chas. Ildstad, Karl Han- 

Andersson, Lars T.- sen 

735 Klint, Sam 

Andersen, Nels Lehnhard, W. 

Anderson, Axel-743 Lavi, Alfred 
Asmussen, MacC. Mortensen, Wlllim 
Brown, Frank Meyerkana. Vater 

Carlson, Atel Federsen, Carl 

Carlsen, Pastar L. Pederson, Jahn 
Dircks, Chr. Peterson, Karl 

Didrecksen, Dillef Adolf 

Fleurii, Gearges Patuyarisky, R. 

Hansen, Hans Teo- Sorensen, Thorn. 

dor Sanders, Frank 

Hanssen, Karel Spriesles, Fritz 

Hansson, Gust. Hj. Steffany, Joseph 
Haugan, Hilmar Steinberg, E. 

Halvartsen, H. Walsh, P. R. 

Holnberg, Alfred A. Weiss, Wilhelm 
Johnson, John Zimmerman, Fritz 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



Jorgensen, R. 
Nelson, J. H. 
Niekel, E. 
Nyqvist, E. 
Olsen, C. A. 
Oisson, H.-C51 
Ouchterlong, F. 
Peabody, F. 
Roch, H. P. 
Rhode, R. 
Rhodes, E. C. 
Sohrimper, F. 
Sigvartsen, C. 
Sigvartsen, C. O. 
Sorensan, T. 
Thorsen, T. 
Thomas, J. 
Vatland, O. 
Yodt, J. 



Blair, J. L. 
Borkman, F. 
Cole, C. 
Docanpo, M. 
Eggers, J. 
Friksson, W. 
Evensen, A. 
Golden, J. H. 
Grondahl, J. 
Gullaksen, H. 
Halberg, H. 
Hillborn, F. 
Hornberg, G. P. 
Hobson, T. 
Hansson, O.-1270 
Hogman, E. 
Hansen, M. 
Jakkopsen, J. 
Johnson, O. 
Johnson, W. 

Letters In the Offlee of the Fishermen's 

Union of the Pacific Coast 

and Alasku. 

Anderson, K. B. Linden, H. E. 

Armstrong, Gust. Nelson, Pete 
Bonde, Ths. Nelson, John 

Dahl, Ben. Tishel, Mathlas 

Jacobsson, C. E. 

(Continued on page 15.) 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
— Visit — 

WALTER EHRLIGHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 
bo had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



News from Abroad. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS, 

JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 

UNION MADE 
Watches & Jewelry 

19 HERON STREET, ABERDEEN, WASH. 




UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 
24 Heron Street. 

Headqudrters for Seamen's Outfits. 
Everything from a pair of Rubber Boots 
• to a Tailor-made Suit. 



Yon can get good 

HONEST UNION-MADE GOODS 

FROM 

A. W. BARKLEY 

56 4i Street 

Becker Block, next to Bicycle Works, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 
He carries everything a sailor wears. 



Have your photographs made while in port by 

THE ABERDEEN ART CO. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHS 

Marine Views, Enlarging, Copying, 
& Crayon Portraits, Picture Frames. 

C. V. LOV, Prop. 
406 Market St. Aberdeen, Wash. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Agency for Aberdeen Steam Laundry. 

Stand on entrance to Union Office. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



W. C JUDSON 

... EXPRESSMAN ... 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
phoni ... ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Sailors' and Loggers' Outfitters 

Cloth. ng, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins. 



SEMfSf^ GEO. FISHER 

Heron Street, ABERDEEN. WASH. 



Lucanio Castro, as Premier, heads a 
newly named progressive Cabinet for 
Portugal. 

Chinese bandits and pirates of Kyang- 
tung Province are declared to be plot- 
ting a revolt. 

Italian Catholics have urged the Pope 
to allow Catholics to participate in gen- 
eral elections. 

Fighting was renewed by the Russian 
and Japanese armies in the vicinity of 
Mukden on October 20. 

Great Britain has refused Germany's 
request to land troops in Walfish Bay 
for the campaign in Southwest Africa. 
Lady Dilke, a noted figure in British 
reform work, died suddenly at London, 
Eng., on October -4, aged sixty-four 
years. 

The rupture between France and the 
Vatican was approved in the French 
Chamber of Deputies by a vote of 325 
to 237. 

The Cuban Congress adjourned on Oc- 
tober 20, after a session of seven months, 
in which nothing was accomplished on 
account of party friction. 

A joint conference of the Scotch and 
North of England steelmakers has de- 
cided to form a combination for the 
regulation of selling prices. 

The Powers are to be asked to form a 
fund of $100,000 for the maintenance of 
Andrew Carnegie's "Palace of Peace," 
which will cost about $800,000. 

King Edward VII recently entertained 
Rear-Admiral Jewell and his staff at 
luncheon at Buckingham Palace, and 
toasted President Roosevelt and the 
American Navy. 

Serious riots are reported to have oc- 
curred in the province of Vilna, Rus- 
sia. General Ridzevsky, the new head 
of the Police Department, has hurriedly 
proceeded to the scene. 

Disp